2017 Ohio County/Metro Population Estimates Part 1





Early this morning, the Census released the most recent population figures for counties, Metropolitan Statistical Areas and Consolidated Statistical Areas. The estimates cover the year from July 1, 2016 to July 1, 2017. For Part 1, we are going to take a look at counties.

Here are Ohio’s 88 counties and their population Census 2010, July 1, 2016 and July 1, 2017.

Census 2010——————————July 1, 2016————————-July 1, 2017
1. Cuyahoga: 1,280,122———–1. Franklin: 1,269,998———–1. Franklin: 1,291,981
2. Franklin: 1,163,414————2. Cuyahoga: 1,253,454——–2. Cuyahoga: 1,248,514
3. Hamilton: 802,374 ————–3. Hamilton: 810,087————-3. Hamilton: 813,822
4. Summit: 541,781—————-4. Summit: 540,394—————4. Summit: 541,228
5. Montgomery: 535,153——5. Montgomery: 531,395——–5. Montgomery: 530,604
6. Lucas: 441,815——————6. Lucas: 432,562—————–6. Lucas 430,887
7. Stark: 375,586——————-7. Butler: 377,933——————7. Butler: 380,604
8. Butler: 368,130——————8. Stark: 373,528——————8. Stark: 372,542
9. Lorain: 301,356—————–9. Lorain: 306,590——————9. Lorain: 307,924
10. Mahoning: 238,823———10. Mahoning: 230,169————10. Lake: 230,117
11. Lake: 230,041—————–11. Lake: 229,270——————11. Mahoning: 229,796
12. Warren: 212,693————-12. Warren: 226,476—————12. Warren: 228,882
13. Trumbull: 210,312———–13. Clermont: 203,016————13. Clermont: 204,214
14. Clermont: 197,363———–14. Trumbull: 201,701————-14. Delaware: 200,464
15. Delaware: 174,214———–15. Delaware: 196,777————15. Trumbull: 200,380
16. Medina: 172,332————-16. Medina: 176,903—————16. Medina: 178,371
17. Licking: 166,492————–17. Licking: 171,822—————17. Licking: 173,448
18. Greene: 161,573————–18. Greene: 165,109—————-18. Greene: 166,752
19. Portage: 161,419————-19. Portage: 162,162—————19. Portage: 162,277
20. Fairfield: 146,156————20. Fairfield: 152,681—————-20. Fairfield: 154,733
21. Clark: 138,333—————–21. Clark: 134,621——————–21. Clark: 134,557
22. Wood: 125,488—————22. Wood: 129,704——————-22. Wood: 130,492
23. Richland: 124,475————23. Richland: 121,167—————-23. Richland: 120,589
24. Wayne: 114,520————–24. Wayne: 116,422——————24. Wayne: 116,038
25. Columbiana: 107,841——-25. Miami: 104,382——————–25. Miami: 105,122
26. Allen: 106,331—————-26. Columbiana: 103,744————26. Allen: 103,198
27. Miami: 102,506————–27. Allen: 103,626——————27. Columbiana: 103,077
28. Ashtabula: 101,497———28. Ashtabula: 98,169————–28. Ashtabula: 97,807
29. Geauga: 93,389————-29. Geauga: 93,848—————–29. Geauga: 93,918
30. Tuscarawas: 92,582——–30. Tuscarawas: 92,485————30. Tuscarawas: 92,297
31. Muskingum: 86,074———31. Muskingum: 85,929————-31. Muskingum: 86,149
32. Scioto: 79,499—————-32. Ross: 76,910———————32. Ross: 77,313
33. Ross: 78,064—————–33. Scioto: 76,240——————–33. Scioto: 75,929
34. Erie: 77,079——————34. Hancock: 75,590—————–34. Hancock: 75,754
35. Hancock: 74,782————35. Erie: 74,944———————–35. Erie: 74,817
36. Belmont: 70,400————-36. Belmont: 68,568—————–36. Belmont: 68,029
37. Jefferson: 69,709————37. Jefferson: 66,914—————37. Athens: 66,597
38. Marion: 66,501—————38. Athens: 66,320——————38. Jefferson: 66,359
39. Athens: 64,757—————39. Marion: 65,334——————39. Marion: 64,967
40. Lawrence: 62,450———–40. Knox: 60,832———————40. Knox: 61,261
41. Washington: 61,778———41. Lawrence: 60,729————–41. Washington: 60,418
42. Sandusky: 60,944————42. Washington: 60,535———–42. Lawrence: 60,249
43. Knox: 60,921——————43. Sandusky: 59,281————–43. Sandusky: 59,195
44. Huron: 59,626—————–44. Huron: 58,391——————-44. Huron: 58,494
45. Seneca: 56,745—————45. Pickaway: 57,530—————45. Pickaway: 57,830
46. Pickaway: 55,698————-46. Union: 55,456——————-46. Union: 56,741
47. Ashland: 53,139—————47. Seneca: 55,357—————–47. Seneca: 55,243
48. Darke: 53,139—————–48. Ashland: 53,417—————–48. Ashland: 53,628
49. Union: 52,300——————49. Darke: 51,636——————-49. Darke: 51,536
50. Shelby: 49,423—————–50. Shelby: 48,726—————–50. Shelby: 48,759
51. Auglaize: 45,949————–51. Auglaize: 45,797—————-51. Auglaize: 45,778
52. Logan: 45,858—————–52. Logan: 45,171——————-52. Logan: 45,325
53. Brown: 44,846—————–53. Holmes: 43,832—————–53. Madison: 44,036
54. Crawford: 43,784————-54. Brown: 43,644——————-54. Holmes: 43,957
55. Highland: 43,589————-55. Madison: 43,354—————–55. Brown: 43,576
56. Madison: 43,435————-56. Highland: 42,993—————–56. Highland: 42,971
57. Fulton: 42,698—————-57. Fulton: 42,325——————–57. Fulton: 42,289
58. Holmes: 42,366————–58. Crawford: 42,037—————–58. Clinton: 42,009
59. Preble: 42,270—————-59. Clinton: 41,881——————-59. Crawford: 41,746
60. Clinton: 42,040—————60. Preble: 41,105——————–60. Preble: 41,120
61. Ottawa: 41,428—————61. Mercer: 40,710——————-61. Mercer: 40,873
62. Mercer: 40,814—————62. Ottawa: 40,495——————-62. Ottawa: 40,657
63. Champaign: 40,097———63. Guernsey: 39,200—————63. Guernsey: 39,093
64. Guernsey: 40,087———–64. Champaign: 38,737————-64. Champaign: 38,840
65. Defiance: 39,037————65. Defiance: 38,121—————–65. Defiance: 38,156
66. Williams: 37,642————66. Williams: 36,921——————66. Williams: 36,784
67. Coshocton: 36,901———-67. Coshocton: 36,644————-67. Coshocton: 36,544
68. Perry: 36,058—————–68. Perry: 36,019——————–68. Perry: 36,024
69. Morrow: 34,827————–69. Morrow: 34,827——————69. Morrow: 34,994
70. Putnam: 34,499————–70. Putnam: 34,016—————–70. Putnam: 33,878
71. Jackson: 33,225————-71. Jackson: 32,534—————–71. Jackson: 32,449
72. Hardin: 32,058—————72. Hardin: 31,407——————-72. Hardin: 31,364
73. Gallia: 30,934—————-73. Gallia: 29,996———————73. Gallia: 29,973
74. Hocking: 29,380————-74. Fayette: 28,662——————74. Fayette: 28,752
75. Fayette: 29,030————–75. Hocking: 28,386—————–75. Hocking: 28,474
76. Carroll: 28,836—————76. Pike: 28,237———————–76. Pike: 28,270
77. Van Wert: 28,744————77. Van Wert: 28,166—————-77. Van Wert: 28,217
78. Pike: 28,709——————-78. Adams: 27,832——————-78. Adams: 27,726
79. Adams: 28,550—————79. Carroll: 27,637——————–79. Carroll: 27,385
80. Henry: 28,215—————-80. Henry: 27,269———————80. Henry: 27,185
81. Meigs: 23,770—————-81. Meigs: 23,177———————81. Meigs: 23,080
82. Wyandot: 22,615————-82. Wyandot: 22,042—————-82. Wyandot: 22,029
83. Paulding: 19,614————83. Paulding: 18,839——————83. Paulding: 18,845
84. Harrison: 15,864————-84. Harrison: 15,257——————84. Harrison: 15,216
85. Morgan: 15,054————–85. Morgan: 14,762——————-85. Morgan: 14,709
86. Noble: 14,645—————–86. Noble: 14,443———————86. Noble: 14,406
87. Monroe: 14,642————–87. Monroe: 14,097——————–87. Monroe: 13,946
88. Vinton: 13,435—————-88. Vinton: 13,021———————88. Vinton: 13,092

Columbus’ counties tended to move up in the rankings 2010-2017.




Let’s now take a look at total growth for the periods July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017 and Census 2010 to July 1, 2017.
Census 2010-July 1, 2017————————-July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Franklin: +128,452—————————–1. Franklin: +21,983
2. Delaware: +26,275—————————–2. Hamilton: +3,735
3. Warren: +16,049——————————–3. Delaware: +3,687
4. Butler: +12,474———————————-4. Butler: +2,671
5. Hamilton: +11,435——————————5. Warren: +2,406
6. Fairfield: +8,556——————————–6. Fairfield: +2,052
7. Licking: +6,956———————————7. Greene: +1,643
8. Clermont: +6,862——————————-8. Licking: +1,626
9. Lorain: +6,555———————————–9. Medina: +1,468
10. Medina: +6,038——————————-10. Lorain: +1,334
11. Greene: +5,178——————————-11. Union: +1,285
12. Wood: +5,003———————————12. Clermont: +1,198
13. Union: +4,482———————————13. Lake: +847
14. Miami: +2,621———————————14. Summit: +834
15. Pickaway: +2,152—————————–15. Wood: +788
16. Athens: +1,833——————————–16. Miami: +740
17. Holmes: +1,593——————————–17. Madison: +682
18. Wayne: +1,522———————————18. Knox: +429
19. Hancock: +965———————————19. Ross: +403
20. Portage: +856———————————-20. Pickaway: +300
21. Madison: +598———————————21. Athens: +277
22. Geauga: +508———————————-22. Muskingum: +220
23. Ashland: +489———————————23. Ashland: +211
24. Knox: +331————————————-24. Hancock: +164
25. Morrow: +167———————————25. Mercer: +163
26. Lake: +67————————————–26. Ottawa: +162
27. Muskingum: +63—————————–27. Logan: +154
28. Mercer: +59———————————-28. Montgomery: +147
29. Perry: -15————————————-29. Clinton: +128
30. Clinton: -28———————————–30. Holmes: +125
31. Auglaize: -171——————————-31. Portage: +115
32. Noble: -239———————————–32. Champaign: +103
33. Fayette: -273——————————–33. Huron: +103
34. Tuscarawas: -285————————–34. Fayette: +90
35. Vinton: -338———————————35. Hocking: +88
36. Morgan: -347——————————-36. Vinton: +71
37. Coshocton: -354—————————37. Geauga: +70
38. Fulton: -409———————————38. Van Wert: +51
39. Pike: -432———————————–39. Morrow: +40
40. Van Wert: -526—————————-40. Defiance: +35
41. Logan: -529———————————41. Pike: +33
42. Summit: -554——————————-42. Shelby: +33
43. Wyandot: -586——————————43. Preble: +15
44. Putnam: -618——————————-44. Paulding: +6
45. Highland: -629—————————–45. Perry: +5
46. Harrison: -646——————————46. Wyandot: -13
47. Shelby: -659——————————–47. Auglaize: -19
48. Meigs: -687———————————48. Highland: -22
49. Hardin: -696——————————–49. Gallia: -23
50. Monroe: -696——————————-50. Fulton: -36
51. Ross: -752———————————-51. Noble: -37
52. Paulding: -770——————————52. Harrison: -41
53. Jackson: -777——————————53. Hardin: -43
54. Ottawa: -777——————————-54. Morgan: -53
55. Adams: -826——————————-55. Clark: -64
56. Williams: -864—————————–56. Brown: -68
57. Defiance: -875—————————-57. Henry: -84
58. Hocking: -899—————————–58. Jackson: -85
59. Gallia: -973——————————–59. Sandusky: -86
60. Guernsey: -998————————–60. Meigs: -97
61. Henry: -1,030—————————–61. Coshocton: -100
62. Huron: -1,131—————————–62. Darke: -100
63. Preble: -1,139—————————-63. Adams: -106
64. Champaign: -1,253———————64. Guernsey: -107
65. Brown: -1,267—————————-65. Seneca: -114
66. Washington: -1,360———————66. Washington: -117
67. Darke: -1,433—————————-67. Erie: -127
68. Carroll: -1,451—————————68. Williams: -137
69. Seneca: -1,499————————-69. Putnam: -138
70. Marion: -1,534————————–70. Monroe: -151
71. Sandusky: -1,751———————-71. Tuscarawas: -188
72. Crawford: -2,039———————–72. Carroll: -252
73. Lawrence: -2,199———————-73. Crawford: -291
74. Erie: -2,249—————————–74. Scioto: -311
75. Belmont: -2,373————————75. Ashtabula: -362
76. Stark: -3,050—————————-76. Marion: -367
77. Allen: -3,128—————————-77. Mahoning: -373
78. Jefferson: -3,350———————-78. Wayne: -384
79. Scioto: -3,568————————–79. Allen: -428
80. Montgomery: -3,634——————80. Lawrence: -480
81. Ashtabula: -3,681———————81. Belmont: -539
82. Clark: -3,790—————————82. Jefferson: -555
83. Richland: -3,887———————-83. Richland: -578
84. Columbiana: -4,764——————84. Columbiana: -667
85. Mahoning: -9,011———————85. Stark: -986
86. Trumbull: -9,938———————-86. Trumbull: -1,321
87. Lucas: -10,928————————87. Lucas: -1,675
88. Cuyahoga: -31,595——————88. Cuyahoga: -4,940

Finally, let’s examine the components of population change, but top 15 only.

Top 15 Counties with the Most Births Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Franklin: +134,9580———————————–1. Franklin: +19,039
2. Cuyahoga: +107,949———————————-2. Cuyahoga: +14,637
3. Hamilton: +79,087————————————-3. Hamilton: +10,787
4. Montgomery: +48,275——————————–4. Montgomery: +6,576
5. Summit: +44,151—————————————5. Summit: +5,945
6. Lucas: +40,874—————————————–6. Lucas: +5,494
7. Butler: +32,888—————————————–7. Butler: +4,531
8. Stark: +30,188——————————————8. Stark: +4,163
9. Lorain: +24,497—————————————-9. Lorain: +3,329
10. Warren: +17,492————————————-10. Mahoning: +2,382
11. Mahoning: +17,312———————————11. Warren: +2,376
12. Clermont: +16,980———————————-12. Clermont: +2,307
13. Lake: +16,465—————————————–13. Lake: +2,244
14. Delaware: +15,662———————————-14. Delaware: +2,146
15. Trumbull: +15,153———————————–15. Trumbull: +2,059

Top 15 Counties with the Fewest Births Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Noble: +1,020——————————————-1. Noble: +131
2. Morgan: +1,050—————————————–2. Monroe: +135
3. Vinton: +1,051——————————————-3. Morgan: +139
4. Monroe: +1,083—————————————–4. Vinton: +144
5. Harrison: +1,150—————————————-5. Harrison: +149
6. Paulding: +1,595—————————————-6. Paulding: +213
7. Meigs: +1,762——————————————-7. Meigs: +228
8. Wyandot: +1,849—————————————8. Wyandot: +240
9. Carroll: +2,011—————————————–9. Carroll: +271
10. Hocking: +2,282————————————-10. Henry: +291
11. Henry: +2,295—————————————–11. Hocking: +309
12. Van Wert: +2,373————————————-12. Adams: +322
13. Adams: +2,431—————————————-13. Pike: +328
14. Ottawa: +2,489—————————————-14. Van Wert: +328
15. Pike: +2,504——————————————–15. Ottawa: +334

Top 15 Counties with the Most Deaths Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Cuyahoga: -98,692———————————–1. Cuyahoga: -13,439
2. Franklin: -65,458————————————–2. Franklin: -9,542
3. Hamilton: -56,157————————————-3. Hamilton: -7,768
4. Montgomery: -42,353——————————-4. Montgomery: -5,883
5. Summit: -40,895————————————–5. Summit: -5,735
6. Lucas: -31,778—————————————-6. Lucas: -4,465
7. Stark: -29.531—————————————–7. Stark: -4,077
8. Butler: -22,747—————————————-8. Butler: -3,347
9. Mahoning: -22,021———————————–9. Lorain: -2,947
10. Lorain: -21,265————————————-10. Mahoning: -2,920
11. Trumbull: -18,189———————————-11. Trumbull: -2,459
12. Lake: -17,265—————————————-12. Lake: -2,444
13. Clark: -12,267—————————————-13. Warren: -1,785
14. Clermont: -11,924———————————-14. Clermont: -1,706
15. Warren: -11,411————————————-15. Clark: -1,680

Top 15 Counties with the Fewest Deaths Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Noble: -916————————————————1. Noble: -131
2. Vinton: -1,025———————————————2. Vinton: -147
3. Morgan: -1,215——————————————-3. Morgan: -152
4. Monroe: -1,260——————————————-4. Harrison: -186
5. Paulding: -1,405—————————————–5. Paulding: -186
6. Harrison: -1,449——————————————6. Monroe: -189
7. Wyandot: -1,756—————————————–7. Wyandot: -246
8. Meigs: -2,004———————————————8. Henry: -249
9. Henry: -2,007———————————————9. Carroll: -289
10. Hocking: -2,131—————————————10. Meigs: -290
11. Putnam: -2,153—————————————–11. Hocking: -294
12. Carroll: -2,191—————————————–12. Putnam: -303
13. Holmes: -2,191—————————————–13. Van Wert: -306
14. Van Wert: -2,275—————————————14. Morrow: -308
15. Hardin: -2,284——————————————-15. Fayette: -318

Top 15 Counties with the Highest Natural Increase (Births vs. Deaths) Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Franklin: +69,500————————————-1. Franklin: +9,497
2. Hamilton: +22,930————————————2. Hamilton: +3,019
3. Butler: +10,141—————————————-3. Cuyahoga: +1,198
4. Cuyahoga: +9,257————————————4. Butler: +1,184
5. Lucas: +9,096——————————————5. Lucas: +1,029
6. Delaware: +8,339————————————-6. Delaware: +1,013
7. Warren: +6,081—————————————-7. Montgomery: +693
8. Montgomery: +5,922——————————–8. Clermont: +601
9. Clermont: +5,056————————————-9. Warren: +591
10. Holmes: +3,410————————————–10. Holmes: +445
11. Fairfield: +3,380————————————-11. Guernsey: +414
12. Wayne: +3,313—————————————12. Licking: +408
13. Summit: +3,256————————————-13. Wayne: +406
14. Lorain: +3,232—————————————14. Lorain: +382
15. Licking: +3,173————————————–15. Fairfield: +378

Top 15 Counties with the Lowest Natural Increase (Births vs. Deaths) Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Mahoning: -4,709—————————————1. Mahoning: -538
2. Trumbull: -3,036—————————————-2. Trumbull: -400
3. Jefferson: -2,097—————————————–3. Jefferson: -276
4. Belmont: -1,370——————————————4. Lake: -200
5. Erie: -990————————————————–5. Belmont: -197
6. Ottawa: -977———————————————-6. Ottawa: -171
7. Columbiana: -891—————————————7. Washington: -134
8. Washington: -829—————————————8. Erie: -132
9. Lake: -800———————————————–9. Columbiana: -130
10. Clark: -694———————————————10. Clark: -119
11. Scioto: -493——————————————–11. Scioto: -68
12. Crawford: -363—————————————-12. Lawrence: -67
13. Ashtabula: -354—————————————13. Meigs: -62
14. Harrison: -299—————————————–14. Monroe: -54
15. Lawrence: -285—————————————15. Harrison: -37

Top 15 Counties with the Most Domestic Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Franklin: +18,270———————————-1. Franklin: +5,861
2. Delaware: +15,671———————————2. Delaware: +2,346
3. Warren: +6,996————————————-3. Fairfield: +1,491
4. Fairfield: +4,106————————————4. Warren: +1,332
5. Licking: +3,332————————————-5. Licking: +1,137
6. Medina: +2,900————————————-6. Medina: +1,058
7. Union: +1,953—————————————7. Union: +871
8. Pickaway: +1,489———————————-8. Greene: +763
9. Wood: +1,447—————————————9. Lake: +748
10. Clermont: +1,372——————————–10. Butler: +668
11. Miami: +1,293————————————-11. Madison: +639
12. Ottawa: +224————————————–12. Miami: +547
13. Madison: +177————————————13. Clermont: +515
14. Morgan: -186————————————–14. Ross: +379
15. Lorain: -271—————————————-15. Ottawa: +337

Top 15 Counties with the Least Domestic Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Cuyahoga: -65,672————————————-1. Cuyahoga: -10,087
2. Hamilton: -25,292—————————————2. Lucas: -3,249
3. Lucas: -23,401——————————————-3. Montgomery: -1,656
4. Montgomery: -16,752———————————-4. Hamilton: -1,533
5. Summit: -10,630—————————————–5. Stark: -1,232
6. Trumbull: -6,852—————————————–6. Trumbull: -923
7. Mahoning: -6,113—————————————7. Wayne: -897
8. Allen: -4,673———————————————–8. Allen: -618
9. Stark: -4,510———————————————-9. Richland: -613
10. Richland: -4,240—————————————-10. Columbiana: -528
11. Columbiana: -3,802————————————11. Portage: -425
12. Ashtabula: -3,779—————————————12. Ashtabula: -412
13. Scioto: -3,267——————————————–13. Lawrence: -392
14. Clark: -3,198———————————————14. Marion: -389
15. Portage: -2,797—————————————–15. Tuscarawas: -382

Top 15 Counties with the Most International Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Franklin: +40,914—————————————1. Franklin: +6,584
2. Cuyahoga: +24,799————————————2. Cuyahoga: +3,961
3. Hamilton: +14,063————————————–3. Hamilton: +2,288
4. Montgomery: +7,418————————————4. Montgomery: +1,131
5. Summit: +7,132——————————————5. Summit: +1,101
6. Butler: +5,226——————————————–6. Butler: +839
7. Lorain: +3,810——————————————–7. Lorain: +641
8. Greene: +3,443——————————————8. Portage: +546
9. Portage: +3,281—————————————–9. Lucas: +539
10. Lucas: +3,247——————————————10. Warren: +499
11. Warren: +3,140—————————————-11. Greene: +473
12. Delaware: +2,178————————————-12. Delaware: +336
13. Athens: +2,081—————————————–13. Athens: +326
14. Mahoning: +1,917————————————-14. Mahoning: +326
15. Lake: +1,740——————————————–15. Lake: +314

Top 15 Counties with the Least International Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Lawrence: -168——————————————1. Lawrence: -19
2. Belmont: -113——————————————–2. Belmont: -18
3. Jefferson: -108——————————————-3. Jefferson: -16
4. Columbiana: -44—————————————–4. Columbiana: -7
5. Williams: -40———————————————-5. Williams: -6
6. Brown: -39————————————————6. Brown: -4
7. Holmes: -16———————————————–7. Holmes: -3
8. Monroe: -5————————————————8. Monroe: -1
9. Vinton: -2————————————————–9. Van Wert: -1
10. Meigs: 0————————————————10. Harrison: 0
11. Trumbull: +2——————————————-11. Ottawa: 0
12. Harrison: +4——————————————-12. Vinton: 0
13. Adams: +7———————————————13. Meigs: +1
14. Van Wert: +10—————————————-14. Noble: +1
15. Noble: +10——————————————–15. Pike: +1
16. Morgan: +10

Top 15 Counties with the Most Net Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Franklin: +59,184—————————————1. Franklin: +12,445
2. Delaware: +17,849————————————–2. Delaware: +2,682
3. Warren: +10,136—————————————-3. Warren: +1,831
4. Fairfield: +5,274—————————————–4. Fairfield: +1,686
5. Licking: +3,928——————————————5. Butler: +1,507
6. Lorain: +3,539——————————————–6. Greene: +1,236
7. Medina: +3,492——————————————-7. Licking: +1,225
8. Wood: +2,720———————————————8. Medina: +1,142
9. Butler: +2,527——————————————–9. Lake: +1,062
10. Union: +2,415—————————————–10. Lorain: +969
11. Greene: +2,038—————————————-11. Union: +952
12. Clermont: +1,975————————————-12. Hamilton: +755
13. Miami: +1,662——————————————-13. Madison: +679
14. Pickaway: +1,556————————————-14. Summit: +649
15. Athens: +1,285——————————————15. Clermont +609

Top 15 Counties with the Least Net Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Cuyahoga: -40,873————————————1. Cuyahoga: -6,126
2. Lucas: -20,154——————————————2. Lucas: -2,710
3. Hamilton: -11,229————————————–3. Stark: -1,061
4. Montgomery: -9,334———————————–4. Trumbull: -918
5. Trumbull: -6,850—————————————-5. Wayne: -794
6. Allen: -4,504———————————————6. Allen: -596
7. Mahoning: -4,196————————————–7. Richland: -587
8. Richland: -4,087—————————————-8. Columbiana: -535
9. Columbiana: -3,846————————————9. Montgomery: -525
10. Summit: -3,496—————————————-10. Lawrence: -411
11. Stark: -3,408——————————————-11. Marion: -379
12. Ashtabula: -3,327————————————-12. Belmont: -341
13. Scioto: -3,064——————————————13. Ashtabula: -336
14. Clark: -3,032——————————————–14. Tuscarawas: -326
15. Huron: -2,359——————————————-15. Holmes: -319

So there you have it for counties. Part 2 on Metro and CSAs will be coming soon!




The Great Thanksgiving Blizzard of 1950




Springfield, Ohio after the storm.

Exactly 67 years ago today, the Great Thanksgiving Blizzard of 1950 began. It was the biggest snowstorm for Columbus, and indeed most of Ohio, during the 40-year period of 1920-1960. That period, especially from the mid-1920s through the mid-1950s, had the lowest rates of cold and snowy winters of any comparable period. The average seasonal snowfall during that period was just 19.1″, a full 9″ below the average the 1980s-2010s have had to date. Still, the period was not without its memorable winters, including 1935-36, 1939-40 and 1947-48. None of those winters, however, had a snow event nearly as big as November 1950.

October 1950 had generally been very warm, ranking historically as the 19th warmest October in Columbus. Highs reached 65 or higher on 21 days of the month. This warmth lasted through early November, and the 80 degrees recorded on November 1st, 1950 remains tied for the warmest November temperature ever recorded. After that, the month seesawed up and down until a strong cold front and rainstorm on the 19th-20th dropped temperatures 25-30 degrees across the state, from the upper 50s-low 60s on the 20th to the low-mid 30s on the 21st. This front would be one of the catalysts for one of Ohio’s greatest winter weather events in its history.

Snow began in Columbus and other parts of Ohio on Thanksgiving, Thursday, November 23rd as a low moved through the Great Lakes and weakened. Behind that system, another cold high pressure was diving south out of Canada.

Thursday, November 23rd 1950 National Map

On Friday the 24th, a low formed on the stalled cold front that had moved through Ohio a few days earlier. Initially forming in southeastern North Carolina, this low would’ve normally gone out to see or moved up the East Coast as a Nor’easter. Instead, the strong, cold high pressure was moving into the Ohio Valley at the same time, and the little low exploded and as it began to move north. The strong push of cold was very evident in Ohio, as temperatures plunged from the upper-30s to upper 40s on Thanksgiving afternoon to single digits and low teens by early Friday morning.

Friday, November 24th, 1950 National Map

The low moved into southern Pennsylvania by the morning of the 25th, and then began to do something few other storms ever do- it began to retrograde toward the west and Ohio, continuing to strengthen as it went. The unusual west movement was caused by a blocking high pressure system parked over Maine.

Saturday, November 25th, 1950 National Map

Light snow that had been ongoing in Ohio on the 24th quickly intensified from east to west across the state as the low moved westward from Central Pennsylvania to Northern Ohio by the end of the day on the 25th. With it arrived winds of 40-60 miles per hour, causing blinding white-outs and drifting.
Saturday the 25th was the height of the storm as the low pressure bottomed out at 978mb, a pressure normally associated with hurricanes. This day was, coincidentally, the famed Ohio State-Michigan rivalry football game, now famously known as the “Snow Bowl” for its terrible weather conditions.

With temperatures on Saturday morning in the single digits, wind chills well below zero and with heavy snow, there was debate about cancelling the game altogether, which was the Big Ten Championship. Ironically, despite the fact that Ohio State would’ve gone on to the Rose Bowl had the game been cancelled (Michigan did not want to reschedule), it was Ohio State’s athletic director who ultimately refused to cancel the game, much to the rest of the staff’s disappointment. Perhaps after the fact, considering Ohio State lost 9-3, that decision was regretted, especially in front of the more than 50,000 die-hard fans that managed to show up for the game.

Columbus would receive 7.5″ at the airport, with eastern suburbs getting up to 10″, just on that Saturday alone.

Due to the blocking high pressure, the storm didn’t budge for days, and it continued through the 26th and 27th before slowly dying out. The last accumulating snowflakes from this system fell on the 29th, 6 days after the snow began.

Sunday, November 26th, 1950 National Map

Monday, November 27th, 1950 National Map

Tuesday, November 28th, 1950 National Map

Wednesday, November 29th, 1950 National Map

All in all, the storm was a record-breaker. Snow totals reached 10″ or more across most of the state except the far northwest and far southwest. In Central Ohio, snow had piled up between 10″-20″, with Columbus officially reporting 15.2″ for the duration of the event. This was the second-heaviest snowstorm in Columbus on record to that time, falling just shy of the 15.3″ that occurred February 17-18, 1910. Both of these storms would be surpassed by the February 14-17, 2003 snowstorm of 15.5″, which itself was surpassed by March 7-8th, 2008’s 20.5″.

Other totals in the state included up to 22″ in Cleveland, 27″ in Marietta, and reports of 44″ in Steubenville in far eastern Ohio. Totals of 25″-30″ were common throughout the eastern 1/3rd of the state. These totals are some of the highest the state has ever seen, coming close to those seen in the eastern Ohio snowstorm of April 1901.

In addition to the snow, record cold temperatures in Columbus of 5 degrees on the 25th (along with a record low maximum of 20) made this one of the greatest early winter events of all time.

Cleveland after the storm.

For more November weather records, go here: November Weather

2016 County and Metro Area Population Estimates




The numbers for July 1, 2016 population estimates came out this morning. Nationally, it seems that overall growth rates slowed down from where they were the year prior, and there were some surprising results in a few cases.

First, let’s take a look at the core counties for Columbus and its peer/Midwest counterparts nationally. The core city is in parenthesis.
2010—————————————————2015———————————2016

1. Cook (Chicago): 5,194,675————-1. Cook: 5,224,823————-1. Cook: 5,203,499
2. Clark (Las Vegas): 1,951,269———-2. Clark: 2,109,289————-2. Clark: 2,155,664
3. Wayne (Detroit): 1,820,584————-3. Santa Clara: 1,910,105—-3. Bexar: 1,928,680
4. Santa Clara (San Jose): 1,781,642—4. Bexar: 1,895,482—4. Santa Clara: 1,919,402
5. Bexar (San Antonio): 1,714,773——-5. Wayne: 1,757,062———5. Wayne: 1,749,366
6. Sacramento (Sac.): 1,418,788–6. Sacramento: 1,496,664–6. Sacramento: 1,414,460
7. Cuyahoga (Cleveland): 1,280,122—7. Orange: 1,284,864——–7. Orange: 1,314,367
8. Allegheny (Pittsburgh): 1,223,348—8. Cuyahoga: 1,255,025—-8. Franklin: 1,264,518
9. Franklin (Columbus): 1,163,414—–9. Franklin: 1,250,269—–9. Cuyahoga: 1,249,352
10. Hennepin (Minn.): 1,152,425—10. Allegheny: 1,229,298—-10. Hennepin: 1,232,483
11. Orange (Orlando): 1,145,951—11. Hennepin: 1,220,459—-11. Allegheny: 1,225,365
12. Travis (Austin): 1,024,266——12. Travis: 1,174,818——12. Travis: 1,199,323
13. Milwaukee (Mil): 947,735–13. Mecklenburg: 1,033,466–13. Mecklenburg: 1,054,835
14. Mecklenburg (Charl.): 919,628–14. Milwaukee: 956,314—14. Milwaukee: 951,448
15. Marion (Indianapolis): 903,393—15. Marion: 938,058———–15. Marion: 941,229
16. Hamilton (Cincinnati): 802,374—16. Hamilton: 807,748——–16. Hamilton: 809,099
17. Multnomah (Portland): 735,334–17. Multnomah: 789,125—17. Multnomah: 799,766
18. Jackson (Kansas City): 674,158–18. Jackson: 686,373——-18. Jackson: 691,801
19. Davidson (Nashville): 626,667—19. Davidson: 678,323——-19. Davidson: 684,410
20. Providence (Providence): 626,671–20. Kent: 636,095———20. Kent: 642,173
21. Kent (Grand Rapids): 602,622–21. Providence: 632,488—-21. Providence: 633,673
22. Summit (Akron): 541,781———22. Douglas: 549,168——–22. Douglas: 554,995
23. Montgomery (Dayton): 535,153–23. Summit: 541,316——–23. Summit: 540,300
24. Douglas (Omaha): 517,110–24. Montgomery: 531,567——24. Dane: 531,273
25. Sedgwick (Wichita): 498,365–25. Dane: 522,878———–25. Montgomery: 531,239
26. Dane (Madison): 488,073——-26. Sedgwick: 510,360——26. Sedgwick: 511,995
27. Lucas (Toledo): 441,815——–27. Polk: 466,688————–27. Polk: 474,045
28. Virginia Beach (VB): 437,994–28. Virginia Beach: 451,854–28. Vir. Beach: 452,602
29. Polk (Des Moines): 430,640—-29. Lucas: 433,496————-29. Lucas: 432,488
30. Allen (Fort Wayne): 355,359—30. Allen: 368,040————-30. Allen: 370,404
31. St. Louis (St. Louis): 319,294–31. St. Louis: 314,875———31. St. Louis: 311,404
32. Lancaster (Lincoln): 285,407—32. Lancaster: 305,705——-32. Lancaster: 309,637
33. Mahoning (Youngstown): 238,823–33. Mahoning: 231,767–33. Mahoning: 230,008

Franklin County moved up one spot to 8th most populated core county of the group.

Total Core County Growth of the 33 Cities Census July 1, 2015 to July 1, 2016
1. Clark-Las Vegas: +46,375
2. Bexar-San Antonio: +33,198
3. Orange-Orlando: +29,503
4. Travis-Austin: +24,505
5. Mecklenburg-Charlotte: +21,369
6. Sacramento-Sacramento: +17,816
7. Franklin-Columbus: +14,249
8. Hennepin-Minneapolis: +12,024
9. Multnomah-Portland: +10,641
10. Santa Clara-San Jose: +9,297
11. Dane-Madison: +8,395
12. Polk-Des Moines: +7,357
13. Davidson-Nashville: +6,087
14. Kent-Grand Rapids: +6,078
15. Douglas-Omaha: +5,827
16. Jackson-Kansas City: +5,428
17. Lancaster-Lincoln: +3,932
18. Marion-Indianapolis: +3,171
19. Allen-Fort Wayne: +2,364
20. Sedgwick-Wichita: +1,635
21. Hamilton-Cincinnati: +1,351
22. Providence-Providence: +1,185
23. Virginia Beach-Virginia Beach: +748
24. Montgomery-Dayton: -328
25. Lucas-Toledo: -1,008
26. Summit-Akron: -1,016
27. Mahoning-Youngstown: -1,759
28. St. Louis-St. Louis: -3,471
29. Allegheny-Pittsburgh: -3,933
30. Milwaukee-Milwaukee: -4,866
31. Cuyahoga-Cleveland: -5,673
32. Wayne-Detroit: -7,696
33. Cook-Chicago: -21,324

And Total Core County Population Change Census 2010 to July 1, 2016 for the 33
1. Bexar: +213,907
2. Clark: +204,395
3. Travis: +175,057
4. Orange: +168,416
5. Santa Clara: +137,760
6. Mecklenburg: +135,207
7. Franklin: +101,104
8. Sacramento: +95,672
9. Hennepin: +80,058
10. Multnomah: +64,432
11. Davidson: +57,729
12. Polk: +43,405
13. Dane: +43,200
14. Kent: +39,551
15. Douglas: +37,885
16. Marion: +37,836
17. Lancaster: +24,230
18. Jackson: +17,643
19. Allen: +15,075
20. Virginia Beach: +14,608
21. Sedgwick: +13,630
22. Cook: +8,824
23. Providence: +7,006
24. Hamilton: +6,725
25. Milwaukee: +3,713
26. Allegheny: +2,017
27. Summit: -1,481
28. Montgomery: 3,914
29. St. Louis: -7,890
30. Mahoning: -8,815
31. Lucas: -9,327
32. Cuyahoga: -30,770
33. Wayne: -71,218

Here are the metro populations for the above 33 cities.
2010—————————————————————————–2016

1. Chicago: 9,461,105———————————————–1. Chicago: 9,512,999
2. Detroit: 4,296,250————————————————-2. Detroit: 4,297,617
3. Minneapolis: 3,348,859——————————————3. Minneapolis: 3,551,036
4. St. Louis: 2,787,701———————————————-4. St. Louis: 2,807,002
5. Pittsburgh: 2,356,285——————————————–5. Charlotte: 2,474,314
6. Portland: 2,226,009———————————————–6. Orlando: 2,441,257
7. Charlotte: 2,217,012———————————————-7. San Antonio: 2,429,609
8. Sacramento: 2,149,127——————————————8. Portland: 2,424,955
9. San Antonio: 2,142,508——————————————9. Pittsburgh: 2,342,299
10. Orlando: 2,134,411———————————————-10. Sacramento: 2,296,418
11. Cincinnati: 2,114,580——————————————–11. Cincinnati: 2,165,139
12. Cleveland: 2,077,240——————————————–12. Las Vegas: 2,155,664
13. Kansas City: 2,009,342——————————————13. Kansas City: 2,104,509
14. Las Vegas: 1,951,269——————————————-14. Austin: 2,056,405
15. Columbus: 1,901,974——————————————–15. Cleveland: 2,055,612
16. Indianapolis: 1,887,877——————————————16. Columbus: 2,041,520
17. San Jose: 1,836,911———————————————-17. Indianapolis: 2,004,230
18. Austin: 1,716,289————————————————–18. San Jose: 1,978,816
19. Virginia Beach: 1,676,822—————————————19. Nashville: 1,865,298
20. Nashville: 1,670,890———————————————20. Virginia Beach: 1,726,907
21. Providence: 1,600,852——————————————21. Providence: 1,614,750
22. Milwaukee: 1,555,908——————————————-22. Milwaukee: 1,572,482
23. Grand Rapids: 988,938—————————————–23. Grand Rapids: 1,047,099
24. Omaha: 865,350————————————————-24. Omaha: 924,129
25. Dayton: 799,232————————————————-25. Dayton: 800,683
26. Akron: 703,200—————————————————26. Akron: 702,221
27. Wichita: 630,919————————————————-27. Madison: 648,929
28. Toledo: 610,001————————————————–28. Wichita: 644,672
29. Madison: 605,435————————————————29. Des Moines: 634,725
30. Des Moines: 569,633——————————————-30. Toledo: 605,221
31. Youngstown: 565,773——————————————31. Youngstown: 544,746
32. Fort Wayne: 416,257——————————————-32. Fort Wayne: 431,802
33. Lincoln: 302,157————————————————-33. Lincoln: 326,921

The Columbus metro fell one spot in this list, but should recover it next year.

Total Metro Area Population Change July 1,2015 to July 1, 2016 for the 33
1. Orlando: +59,125
2. Austin: +58,301
3. Charlotte: +49,671
4. San Antonio: +47,906
5. Las Vegas: +46,375
6. Portland: +40,148
7. Nashville: +36,337
8. Minneapolis: +32,784
9. Sacramento: +28,830
10. Columbus: +21,376
11. Kansas City: +20,045
12. Indianapolis: +17,688
13. Des Moines: +12,145
14. San Jose: +10,238
15. Omaha: +9,861
16. Cincinnati: +9,747
17. Grand Rapids: +8,762
18. Madison: +8,315
19. Lincoln: +4,094
20. Virginia Beach: +3,439
21. Fort Wayne: +2,430
22. Providence: +2,176
23. Wichita: +1,656
24. Dayton: +883
25. Detroit: +79
26. Toledo: -358
27. Akron: -1,137
28. St. Louis: -1,328
29. Milwaukee: -1,867
32. Cleveland: -4,317
31. Youngstown: -4,644
32. Pittsburgh: -8,972
33. Chicago: -19,570

And the Total Metro Area Population Change Census 2010 to July 1, 2016
1. Austin: +340,085
2. Orlando: +306,858
3. San Antonio: +287,093
4. Charlotte: +257,340
5. Las Vegas: +204,395
6. Minneapolis: +202,177
7. Portland: +198,943
8. Nashville: +194,415
9. Sacramento: +147,274
10. San Jose: +141,875
11. Columbus: +139,517
12. Indianapolis: +116,148
13. Kansas City: +95,171
14. Des Moines: +65,092
15. Omaha: +58,773
16. Grand Rapids: +58,159
17. Chicago: +51,449
18. Cincinnati: +50,388
19. Virginia Beach: +50,090
20. Madison: +43,492
21. Lincoln: +24,764
22. St. Louis: +19,243
23. Milwaukee: +16,528
24. Fort Wayne: +15,548
25. Wichita: +13,753
26. Providence: +13,550
27. Dayton: +1,464
28. Detroit: +1,304
29. Akron: -982
30. Toledo: -4,780
31. Pittsburgh: -13,992
32. Youngstown: -21,053
33. Cleveland: -21,646

Now let’s take a closer look at Ohio only.

Top 20 Most-Populated Ohio Counties
2010————————————————-2016

1. Cuyahoga: 1,280,122—————-1. Franklin: 1,264,518
2. Franklin: 1,163,414——————-2. Cuyahoga: 1,249,352
3. Hamilton: 802,374——————–3. Hamilton: 809,099
4. Summit: 541,781———————-4. Summit: 540,300
5. Montgomery: 535,153—————5. Montgomery: 531,239
6. Lucas: 441,815————————6. Lucas: 432,488
7. Stark: 375,586————————-7. Butler: 377,537
8. Butler: 368,130————————8. Stark: 373,612
9. Lorain: 301,356———————–9. Lorain: 306,365
10. Mahoning: 238,823—————-10. Mahoning: 230,008
11. Lake: 230,041———————–11. Lake: 228,614
12. Warren: 212,693——————–12. Warren: 227,063
13. Trumbull: 210,312——————13. Clermont: 203,022
14. Clermont: 197,363——————14. Trumbull: 201,825
15. Delaware: 174,214—————–15. Delaware: 196,463
16. Medina: 172,332——————–16. Medina: 177,221
17. Licking: 166,492———————17. Licking: 172,198
18. Greene: 161,573———————18. Greene: 164,765
19. Portage: 161,419——————–19. Portage: 161,921
20. Fairfield: 146,156——————–20. Fairfield: 152,597

Top 10 Fastest-Growing Counties July 1, 2015 to July 1, 2016
1. Franklin: +14,249
2. Delaware: +3,579
3. Warren: +2,624
4. Butler: +2,078
5. Licking: +1,439
6. Hamilton: +1,351
7. Fairfield: +1,271
8. Clermont: +1,231
9. Lorain: +1,152
10. Union: +1,142

Top 10 Fastest-Declining Counties July 1, 2015 to July 1, 2016
1. Cuyahoga: -5,673
2. Trumbull: -1,806
3. Mahoning: -1,759
4. Stark: -1,253
5. Clark: -1,029
6. Summit: -1,016
7. Lucas: -1,008
8. Columbiana: -998
9. Madison: -684
10. Scioto: -664

Top 10 Fastest-Growing Counties Census 2010 to July 1, 2016
1. Franklin: +100,989
2. Delaware: +22,274
3. Warren: +14,195
4. Butler: +9,402
5. Hamilton: +6,731
6. Fairfield: +6,420
7. Licking: +5,706
8. Clermont: +5,659
9. Lorain: +5,009
10. Medina: +4,888

Top 10 Fastest-Declining Counties Census 2010 to July 1, 2016
1. Cuyahoga: -30,757
2. Lucas: -9,327
3. Mahoning: -8,799
4. Trumbull: -8,493
5. Columbiana: -4,156
6. Montgomery: -3,897
7. Clark: -3,547
8. Scioto: -3,411
9. Richland: -3,368
10. Ashtabula: -3,257




Columbus Metro’s GDP vs. Midwest and National Peers



Rank of Major Midwest Metros and Columbus National Peers by GDP, 2001, 2010 and 2015
In Millions
2001——————————————–2010————————————-2015

1. Chicago, IL: $416,444————-1. Chicago: $533,825————–1. Chicago: $640,656
2. Detroit, MI: $190,921———–2. Minneapolis: $199,606——-2. Minneapolis: $248,779
3. Minneapolis, MN: $148,192—–3. Detroit: $197,973—————–3. Detroit: $245,607
4. San Jose, CA: $125,037———4. San Jose: $163,836———–4. San Jose: $235,222
5. St. Louis, MO: $102,385———5. Portland: $141,233————5. Portland: $158,770
6. Pittsburgh, PA: $88,769———-6. St. Louis: $133,888———6. St. Louis: $155,077
7. Cleveland: $87,796————-7. Pittsburgh: $117,895———-7. Charlotte: $152,447
8. Portland, OR: $80,753———8. Charlotte: $114,500————8. Pittsburgh: $138,873
9. Cincinnati: $79,638————-9. Indianapolis: $111,084——-9. Indianapolis: $134,081
10. Kansas City, MO: $79,544—-10. Cleveland: $109,365—–10. Cleveland: $128,448
11. Charlotte, NC $78,675———11. Kansas City: $107,265—11. Cincinnati: $127,057
12. Indianapolis, IN: $78,009——-12. Cincinnati: $104,314—-12. Kansas City: $125,618
13. Columbus: $74,172————-13. Orlando: $101,307——–13. Columbus: $124,381
14. Sacramento, CA: $66,696—–14. Columbus: $96,475——14. Orlando: $121,329
15. Orlando, FL: $66,644———–15. Sacramento: $96,015—-15. Austin: $119,949
16. Milwaukee, WI: $65,033——–16. Austin: $87,473———-16. Sacramento: $118,822
17. Nashville, TN: $58,245———17. Milwaukee: $86,569—–17. Nashville: $113,680
18. Las Vegas, NV: $57,035——-18. Las Vegas: $85,020—–18. San Antonio: $108,879
19. Virginia Beach, VA: $54,040—-19. Nashville: $84,804—19. Las Vegas: $103,343
20. Austin, TX: $53,915——20. Virginia Beach: $82,685—–20. Milwaukee: $102,209
21. San Antonio, TX: $53,248—21. San Antonio: $81,722—21. Virginia Beach: $95,680
22. Providence, RI: $49,997——-22. Providence: $67,754—-22. Providence: $78,694
23. Grand Rapids, MI: $35,248—-23. Omaha: $47,711——-23. Omaha: $59,090
24. Omaha, NE: $32,044——–24. Grand Rapids: $41,221–24. Grand Rapids: $53,949
25. Dayton: $29,658————–25. Dayton: $34,226————25. Dayton: $39,206
26. Toledo: $22,216————–26. Akron: $28,628————–26. Akron: $34,419
27. Akron: $21,684—————27. Toledo: $27,158————-27. Toledo: $34,019
28. Youngstown: $15,314——28. Youngstown: $17,293——28. Youngstown: $21,417

Rank by Total Change in Millions 2001-2015
1. Chicago: +$224,212
2. San Jose: +$110,185
3. Minneapolis: +$100,587
4. Portland: +$78,017
5. Charlotte: +$73,772
6. Austin: +$66,034
7. Indianapolis: +$56,072
8. San Antonio: +$55,631
9. Nashville: +$55,435
10. Detroit: +$54,686
11. Orlando: +$54,685
12. St. Louis: +$52,692
13. Sacramento: +$52,126
14. Columbus: +$50,209
15. Pittsburgh: +$50,104
16. Cincinnati: +$47,419
17. Las Vegas: +$46,308
18. Kansas City: +$46,074
19. Virginia Beach: +$41,640
20. Cleveland: +$40,652
21. Milwaukee: +$37,176
22. Providence: +$28,697
23. Omaha: +$27,046
24. Grand Rapids: +$18,701
25. Akron: +$12,735
26. Toledo: +$11,803
27. Dayton: +$9,548
28. Youngstown: +$6,103

Rank by Total Change in Millions 2010-2015
1. Chicago: +$106,831
2. San Jose: +$71,386
3. Minneapolis: +$49,173
4. Detroit: +$47,634
5. Charlotte: +$37,947
6. Austin: +$32,476
7. Nashville: $28,876
8. Columbus: +$27,906
9. San Antonio: +$27,157
10. Indianapolis +$22,997
11. Sacramento: +$22,807
12. Cincinnati: +$22,743
13. St. Louis: +$21,189
14. Pittsburgh: +$20,978
15. Orlando: +$20,022
16. Cleveland: +$19,083
17. Kansas City: +$18,353
18. Las Vegas: +$18,323
19. Portland: +$17,537
20. Milwaukee: +$15,640
21. Virginia Beach: +$12,995
22. Grand Rapids: +$12,728
23. Omaha: +$11,379
24. Providence: +$10,940
25. Toledo: +$6,861
26. Akron: +$5,791
27. Dayton: +$4,980
28. Youngstown: +$4,124

Total Rank by % Change 2001-2015
1. Austin: +122.48%
2. San Antonio: +104.48%
3. Portland: +96.61%
4. Nashville: +95.18%
5. Charlotte: +93.77%
6. San Jose: +88.12%
7. Omaha: +84.40%
8. Orlando: +82.06%
9. Las Vegas: +81.19%
10. Sacramento: +78.15%
11. Virginia Beach: +77.05%
12. Indianapolis: +71.88%
13. Minneapolis: +67.88%
14. Columbus: +67.69%
15. Cincinnati: +59.54%
16. Akron: +58.73%
17. Kansas City: +57.92%
18. Providence: +57.40%
19. Milwaukee: +57.16%
20. Pittsburgh: +56.44%
21. Chicago: +53.84%
22. Toledo: +53.13%
23. Grand Rapids: +53.06%
24. St. Louis: +51.46%
25. Cleveland: +46.30%
26. Youngstown: +39.85%
27. Dayton: +32.19%
28. Detroit: +28.64%

Total Rank by % Change 2010-2015
1. San Jose: +43.57%
2. Austin: +37.13%
3. Nashville: +34.05%
4. San Antonio: +33.23%
5. Charlotte: +33.14%
6. Grand Rapids: +30.88%
7. Columbus: +28.93%
8. Toledo: +25.26%
9. Minneapolis: +24.64%
10. Detroit: +24.06%
11. Omaha: +23.85%
12. Youngstown: +23.85%
13. Sacramento: +23.75%
14. Cincinnati: +21.80%
15. Las Vegas: +21.55%
16. Indianapolis: +20.70%
17. Akron: +20.23%
18. Chicago: +20.01%
19. Orlando: +19.76%
20. Milwaukee: +18.07%
21. Pittsburgh: +17.79%
22. Cleveland: +17.45%
23. Kansas City: +17.11%
24. Providence: +16.15%
25. St. Louis: +15.83%
26. Virginia Beach: +15.72%
27. Dayton: +14.55%
28. Portland: +12.42%

Finally, let’s take a look at per-capita GDP and income.

Rank of Metros by Per-Capita GDP in Dollars, 2015
1. San Jose: $112,851
2. Minneapolis: $63,474
3. Portland: $62,229
4. Chicago: $59,688
5. Indianapolis: $59,479
6. Milwaukee: $58,219
7. Omaha: $57,334
8. Cleveland: $56,013
9. Nashville: $55,841
10. Charlotte: $55,610
11. Pittsburgh: $55,335
12. Austin: $55,323
13. Columbus: $55,005
14. Kansas City: $54,097
15. Cincinnati: $52,649
16. Detroit: $51,428
17. Virginia Beach: $49,606
18. Toledo: $49,428
19. St. Louis: $49,258
20. Sacramento: $46,697
21. Grand Rapids: $46,677
22. Orlando: $45,756
23. Akron: $44,246
24. Dayton: $43,748
25. Providence: $43,744
26. Las Vegas: $43,476
27. San Antonio: $42,169
28. Youngstown: $34,960

Total Growth 2001-2015 by Rank, in Dollars
1. San Jose: +$40,677
2. Portland: +$18,225
3. Pittsburgh: +$10,064
4. Austin: +$9,925
5. Toledo: +$7,414
6. Virginia Beach: +$7,256
7. Nashville: +$7,071
8. Cleveland: +$6,767
9. Milwaukee: +$6,744
10. Omaha: +$6,581
11. Akron: +$6,167
12. Minneapolis: +$5,900
13. Providence: +$5,560
14. Chicago: +4,663
15. San Antonio: +$4,652
16. Cincinnati: +$4,426
17. Youngstown: +$4,391
18. Sacramento: +$3,210
19. Columbus: +$3,182
20. Indianapolis: +$2,984
21. Grand Rapids: +$2,971
22. Charlotte: +$2,880
23. Kansas City: +$2,770
24. St. Louis: +$2,699
25. Detroit: +$2,011
26. Dayton: +$162
27. Orlando: -$1,630
28. Las Vegas: -$5,041

Total Per-Capita GDP Growth 2010-2015, in Dollars
1. San Jose: +$23,814
2. Toledo: +$6,242
3. Pittsburgh: +$6,172
4. Nashville: +$5,643
5. Detroit: +$5,459
6. Austin: +$5,307
7. Grand Rapids: +$5,158
8. Youngstown: +$4,987
9. San Antonio: +$4,878
10. Columbus: +$4,864
11. Minneapolis: +$4,644
12. Charlotte: +$4,578
13. Chicago: +$4,004
14. Cleveland: +$3,992
15. Cincinnati: +$3,986
16. Akron: +$3,774
17. Milwaukee: +$2,913
18. Omaha: +$2,863
19. Sacramento: +$2,680
20. Providence: +$1,902
21. St. Louis: +$1,884
22. Dayton: +$1,439
23. Kansas City: +$1,270
24. Indianapolis: +$1,186
25. Virginia Beach: +$998
26. Las Vegas: +$206
27. Portland: -$992
28. Orlando: -$1,345

What the numbers suggest is that Columbus was performing at a middle-mediocre level in the first half of the 2001-2015 period, and has generally been performing significantly better in the latter half. In Ohio, Columbus is poised to become Ohio’s largest metro economy over the next few years.



2014 State GDP



New state-level GDP figures were recently released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. Where does Ohio stand?

First, let’s look at the top 20 states for total GDP in 2014

2014 Total, in Millions
1. California: 2,311,616
2. Texas: 1,648,036
3. New York: 1,404,518
4. Florida: 839,944
5. Illinois: 745,875
6. Pennsylvania: 662,890
7. Ohio: 583,261
8. New Jersey: 549,099
9. North Carolina: 483,126
10. Georgia: 476,483
11. Virginia: 463,613
12. Massachusetts: 459,937
13. Michigan: 451,516
14. Washington: 427,052
15. Maryland: 348,631
16. Indiana: 317,840
17. Minnesota: 316,204
18. Colorado: 306,663
19. Tennessee: 300,604
20. Wisconsin: 292,891

Ohio maintained its 7th-place position through 2014.
Now let’s look at the 20 states that had the biggest increases.

Total GDP Growth in Millions 2013-2014
1. California: +98,625
2. Texas: +90,843
3. New York: +62,927
4. Florida: +39,247
5. Pennsylvania: +22,596
6. Illinois: +21,080
7. Ohio: +20,416
8. Georgia: +20,000
9. Washington: +19,892
10. Massachusetts: +18,470
11. Colorado: +18,325
12. Michigan: +16,842
13. North Carolina: +16,051
14. New Jersey: +11,703
15. Oregon: +10,810
16. Tennessee: +10,479
17. Arizona: +9,422
18. Maryland: +9,222
19. Minnesota: +8,934
20. Virginia: +8,629

So Ohio is growing at the same position as its overall ranking. No states below it are set to pass it anytime in the near future. In fact, the gap is widening from its nearest threats.

What about per-capita GDP, which is a measure of the state’s total GDP divided by its population?

Per-Capita GDP, in Dollars 2014
1. Alaska: 66,160
2. North Dakota: 65,225
3. New York: 64,818
4. Connecticut: 64,676
5. Wyoming: 64,309
6. Massachusetts: 63,005
7. Delaware: 60,551
8. New Jersey: 56,405
9. Washington: 55,298
10. California: 54,462
11. Texas: 54,433
12. Maryland: 53,759
13. Illinois: 52,827
14. Minnesota: 52,801
15. Nebraska: 52,724
16. Colorado: 52,214
17. Virginia: 51,338
18. Oregon: 51,329
19. New Hampshire: 49,951
20. Hawaii: 49,686

27. Ohio: 45,887

Ohio is in the bottom half. Not great, as it indicates that it’s actually underperforming in GDP given its population.

So there you have it, a quick 2014 GDP update. To find out more, check out the BEA site at http://www.bea.gov/index.htm It has tons of economic information for states and metro areas.

2014 Ohio County Population Estimates



New county population estimates were released Thursday. Franklin County had its 2nd highest growth year since 1970 and within a few years of passing Cuyahoga County to become the most populated in Ohio.

Top 25 Largest Ohio Counties and Rank for Census 2010, July 1, 2013 and July 1, 2014
2010 2013 2014

1. Cuyahoga: 1,280,122–1. Cuyahoga: 1,265,889–1. Cuyahoga: 1,259,828
2. Franklin: 1,163,414—–2. Franklin: 1,213,834——2. Franklin: 1,231,393
3. Hamilton: 802,374——3. Hamilton: 804,429——-3. Hamilton: 806,631
4. Summit: 541,781——–4. Summit: 541,787———4. Summit: 541,943
5. Montgomery: 535,153–5. Montgomery: 534,764–5. Montgomery: 533,116
6. Lucas: 441,815———-6. Lucas: 436,803———–6. Lucas: 435,286
7. Stark: 375,586———–7. Stark: 375,222————7. Stark: 375,736
8. Butler: 368,130———-8. Butler: 371,511————8. Butler: 374,158
9. Lorain: 301,356———-9. Lorain: 303,306———–9. Lorain: 304,216
10. Mahoning: 238,823—10. Mahoning: 234,336—-10. Mahoning: 233,204
11. Lake: 230,041———-11. Lake: 229,634———–11. Lake: 229,230
12. Warren: 212,693——-12. Warren: 219,578——-12. Warren: 221,659
13. Trumbull: 210,312—–13. Trumbull: 206,480——13. Trumbull: 205,175
14. Clermont: 197,363—–14. Clermont: 200,254—–14. Clermont: 201,560
15. Delaware: 174,214—-15. Delaware: 185,202—–15. Delaware: 189,113
16. Medina: 172,332——-16. Medina: 174,792——–16. Medina: 176,029
17. Licking: 166,492——–17. Licking: 168,503——–17. Licking: 169,390
18. Greene: 161,573——-18. Greene: 163,465——–18. Greene: 163,820
19. Portage: 161,419——-19. Portage: 161,423——-19. Portage: 161,882
20. Fairfield: 146,156——-20. Fairfield: 148,797——-20. Fairfield: 150,381
21. Clark: 138,333———-21. Clark: 136,803———–21. Clark: 136,554
22. Wood: 125,488———22. Wood: 129,209———-22. Wood: 129,590
23. Richland: 124,475—–23. Richland: 122,292——23. Richland: 121,942
24. Wayne: 114,520——-24. Wayne: 115,144———24. Wayne: 115,537
25. Columbiana: 107,841–25. Columbiana: 105,885–25. Columbiana: 105,686

Top 25 Counties with the Largest Numerical Growth, July 1, 2013 to July 1, 2014
1. Franklin: +17,559
2. Delaware: +3,911
3. Butler: +2,647
4. Hamilton: +2,202
5. Warren: +2,081
6. Fairfield: +1,584
7. Clermont: +1,306
8. Lorain: +1,210
9. Licking: +887
10. Madison: +646
11. Stark: +514
12. Miami: +484
13. Portage: +459
14. Pickaway: +410
15. Union: +396
16. Wayne: +393
17. Wood: +381
18. Greene: +355
19. Knox: +244
20. Holmes: +236
21. Geauga: +236
22. Athens: +198
23. Fulton: +162
24. Summit: +156
25. Muskingum: +122

Top 25 Counties with the Largest Numerical Growth, Census 2010 to July 1, 2014
1. Franklin: +67,850
2. Delaware: +14,924
3. Warren: +8,791
4. Butler: +6,028
5. Hamilton: +4,257
6. Fairfield: +4,229
7. Clermont: +4,197
8. Wood: +4,102
9. Medina: +3,696
10. Licking: +2,906
11. Lorain: +2,860
12. Greene: +2,251
13. Holmes: +1,532
14. Union: +1,509
15. Miami: +1,394
16. Pickaway: +1,178
17. Wayne: +1,023
18. Geauga: +885
19. Hancock: +555
20. Madison: +488
21. Portage: +461
22. Morrow: +325
23. Knox: +237
24. Tuscarawas: +206
25. Summit: +157

Top 25 Counties for Total Birth July 1, 2013 to July 1, 2014
1. Franklin: 18,595
2. Cuyahoga: 14,801
3. Hamilton: 11,009
4. Montgomery: 6,708
5. Summit: 6,235
6. Lucas: 5,742
7. Butler: 4,572
8. Stark: 4,106
9. Lorain: 3,340
10. Warren: 2,396
11. Mahoning: 2,369
12. Clermont: 2,357
13. Lake: 2,204
14. Delaware: 2,119
15. Trumbull: 2,070
16. Licking: 1,948
17. Greene: 1,757
18. Medina: 1,732
19. Fairfield: 1,647
20. Clark: 1,567
21. Wayne: 1,501
22. Richland: 1,413
23. Wood: 1,370
24. Portage: 1,369
25. Allen: 1,288

Top 25 Counties for Total Deaths July 1, 2013 to July 1, 2014
1. Cuyahoga: 13,316
2. Franklin: 9,197
3. Hamilton: 7,718
4. Montgomery: 5,632
5. Summit: 5,595
6. Lucas: 4,365
7. Stark: 3,910
8. Butler: 3,186
9. Mahoning: 2,957
10. Trumbull: 2,407
11. Lake: 2,366
12. Warren: 1,636
13. Clark: 1,631
14. Clermont: 1,574
15. Licking: 1,505
16. Medina: 1,352
17. Greene: 1,350
18. Portage: 1,329
19. Richland: 1,313
20. Fairfield: 1,233
21. Columbiana: 1,140
22. Ashtabula: 1,092
23. Allen: 1,063
24. Wayne: 1,055
25. Delaware: 1,019

Top 25 Counties for Total Natural Change (Births vs. Deaths) July 1, 2013 to July 1, 2014
1. Franklin: 9,398
2. Hamilton: 3,291
3. Cuyahoga: 1,481
4. Lucas: 1,377
5. Butler: 1,386
6. Delaware: 1,100
7. Montgomery: 1,076
8. Clermont: 783
9. Warren: 760
10. Summit: 640
11. Lorain: 546
12. Holmes: 506
13. Wayne: 446
14. Licking: 443
15. Fairfield: 414
16. Greene: 407
17. Medina: 380
18. Wood: 359
19. Union: 271
20. Hancock: 249
21. Allen: 225
22. Shelby: 212
23. Geauga: 199
24. Stark: 196
25. Huron: 165



Columbus Poverty vs. Ohio Cities



The following numbers are based off the American Community Survey. They are estimates, not physical counts like the population census, so there is a definite fudge factor involved with them as to their overall accuracy. 2011 is the latest year available for the ACS estimates.

2011 % of City Population Living in Poverty, Lowest to Highest
1. Columbus: 23.2%
2. Akron: 28.9%
3. Cincinnati: 29.5%
4. Toledo: 30.1%
5. Youngstown: 33.2%
6. Cleveland: 34.3%
7. Dayton: 35.7%

Change from 2010-2011
Cincinnati: -3.6%
Akron: -1.7%
Cleveland: +0.9%
Columbus: +2.7%
Dayton: +3.5%
Youngstown: +4.4%
Toledo: +16.7%
Change from 2007-2011
Youngstown: +1.8%
Columbus: +10.5%
Cleveland: +16.3%
Dayton: +18.2%
Akron: +22.5%
Cincinnati: +25.5%
Toledo: +33.2%

Change from 2000-2011
1. Cleveland: +30.4%
2. Youngstown: +33.9%
3. Cincinnati: +34.7%
4. Dayton: +55.2%
5. Columbus: +56.8%
6. Akron: +65.1%
7. Toledo: +68.2%

2011 % of Metro Population Living in Poverty, Lowest to Highest
1. Cincinnati: 14.3%
2. Columbus: 15.4%
3. Cleveland: 16.0%
4. Youngstown: 16.1%
5. Akron: 16.6%
6. Dayton: 17.6%
7. Toledo: 20.2%

Change from 2010-2011
1. Youngstown: -5.8%
2. Columbus: -1.9%
3. Cincinnati: +2.1%
4. Cleveland: +6.0%
5. Akron: +7.1%
6. Dayton: +8.0%
7. Toledo: +16.1%

Change from 2007-2011
1. Youngstown: +8.8%
2. Columbus: +14.9%
3. Akron: +23.9%
4. Cleveland: +26.0%
5. Cincinnati: +28.8%
6. Toledo: +36.5%
7. Dayton: +37.5%

Change from 2000-2011
1. Youngstown: +40.0%
2. Cleveland: +48.1%
3. Cincinnati: +50.5%
4. Columbus: +55.5%
5. Toledo: +66.9%
6. Akron: +69.4%
7. Dayton: +76.0%