Worst Winters of All Time?

As summer slowly approaches its inevitable end, thoughts of winter have started to creep into our minds. The last two winters seemed particularly harsh, and questions were often asked as to their historic status as well as whether another bad winter was on the way. Ask any older person in Ohio, and the winters between 1976 and 1979 will often come up. But do they really deserve their reputations? To find out, I came up with a ranking system for meteorological winter only- December through February. Here was the criteria:

Temperature: # of 32 or Below Highs, # of 32 or Below Lows, # of 0 or Below Highs, # of 0 or Below Lows: Each earned the winter a point for each day that featured these conditions.
# of 60 or Above Highs and # of 50 or Above Lows meant a point was removed for each occurrence.

Precipitation: # of Days with Measurable Snowfall, # of 1″+ Snow Days, # of 2.5″+ Snow Days, # of 5″+ Snow Days, # of 10″+ Snow Days as well as # of Measurable Precipitation Days all counted as 1 point for each occurrence.

I then added the temperature and precipitation points together to come up with a ranking for how miserable each winter really was.

Here are the 30 worst winters of all time and their total points.

1. 1976-1977: 240
2. 1977-1978: 238
3. 1969-1970: 230
4. 2002-2003: 228
5. 1978-1979: 226
6. 1880-1881: 225
7. 1917-1918: 223
8. 1935-1936: 220
9. 2013-2014: 219
10. 1892-1893, 1962-1963: 218
11. 1909-1910: 217
12. 1995-1996, 2009-2010: 208
13. 2010-2011: 207
14. 1903-1904: 204
15. 1981-1982: 202
16. 1911-1912, 1963-1964: 197
17. 1886-1887, 1919-1920: 196
18. 1904-1905: 195
19. 1984-1985: 194
20. 1916-1917: 193
21. 1894-1895: 191
22. 1883-1884: 189
23. 2000-2001: 188
24. 1947-1948, 1961-1962: 187
25. 1993-1994: 186
26. 1884-1885, 1939-1940: 185
27. 1983-1984, 1987-1988: 183
28. 1902-1903, 2014-2015: 182
29. 1954-1955: 180
30. 1878-1879, 1882-1883, 1960-1961, 1985-1986, 2003-2004, 2008-2009: 179

Do any of these surprise you? Both 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 are in the top 30 worst, but only 2013-2014 is in the top 10. In fact, other recent winters like 2000-2001, 2002-2003, 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 are all ranked worse than last winter. There have been a surprising number of recent winters in the top 30, however. There have been 8 total since 2000. No other similar time frame has produced as many.

And here are the 30 best winters (if you like warm, snowless, dry winters, that is).

1. 1931-1932: 74
2. 1889-1890: 75
3. 1879-1880: 86
4. 1997-1998: 102
5. 1881-1882, 1943-1944: 111
6. 2001-2002: 112
7. 1996-1997: 115
8. 1948-1949, 1953-1954: 118
9. 1941-1942, 1982-1983: 120
10. 1918-1919: 122
11. 1936-1937: 123
12. 1932-1933, 1991-1992: 124
13. 1930-1931: 125
14. 1905-1906, 1972-1973: 126
15. 1949-1950: 128
16. 1897-1898, 1986-1987: 129
17. 2011-2012: 130
18. 1938-1939: 131
19. 1937-1938: 134
20. 1908-1909, 1920-1921, 2005-2006: 135
21. 1924-1925: 137
22. 1896-1897: 138
23. 1927-1928, 1929-1930, 1940-1941, 1990-1991: 139
24. 1952-1953: 140
25. 1921-1922, 1945-1946, 1998-1999: 141
26. 1988-1989: 143
27. 1891-1892: 144
28. 1946-1947, 1971-1972: 145
29. 1912-1913, 1934-1935: 147
30. 1923-1924, 1992-1993: 148

Look how many of the warmest/least snowy occur between 1920 and 1945. Historically, this period had the fewest number of cold and/or snowy winters on record of any such 25-year period.

And what about winter 2015-2016? Well, that remains to be seen. However, the developing strong El Nino suggests a warmer than average winter. However, factors such as its position (west or east-based) as well as the PDO could throw some wrenches into that standard El Nino forecast. Either way, it will likely not be a top 30 worst.

Summer of Rain 2015

This summer has been wet… very wet. Rain has fallen on far more days than not, and cloud cover has hung thick and heavy in what are historically much sunnier months. To top it all off, temperatures have been somewhat below normal.

How wet has summer 2015 been up through today? Meteorological summer runs June 1st-August 31st, and today makes the midpoint of that period, so I thought it would be a good time to check in and answer that question.

Here are the top 10 wettest summers through yesterday.

1. 1958: 12.54″
2. 2008: 11.68″
3. 1990: 10.93″
4. 2015: 10.66″
5. 1949: 10.40″
6. 1973: 10.23″
7. 1917: 10.06″
8. 1928: 10.02″
9. 1937: 9.75″
10. 1969: 9.38″

So 2015 is running the 4th wettest. It looks to be dry the next few days before more thunderstorms and rain return, so 2015′s position may end up rising.

What are the wettest full summers of all time? A few of the above years went on to be in the top 10, but not all.

1. 1958: 22.02″
2. 1979: 20.92″
3. 1995: 19.85″
4. 2003: 19.39″
5. 1969: 19.09″
6. 1915: 18.92″
7. 1992: 18.44″
8. 1973: 17.81″
9. 1989: 17.45″
10. 1949: 16.54″

Summer 2015 needs about 6″ more to reach into the top 10 wettest summers, which at the current pace is more than possible.

How Big is the Columbus Police Force?

Police departments nationally have been in the news quite a bit lately, but usually not for positive reasons. Excessive force, racism and even murder charges have been levied against police. While it is difficult to measure such incidents within individual departments, we can at least look at how big police departments are relative to a city’s population, and that’s what this post is about.

I looked at Columbus and its peers and Midwest counterparts to see where it ranked in terms of police presence within the city limits. Here is what I found.

Total Law Enforcement Officers, 2012

Chicago, IL: 12,766
Las Vegas, NV: 4,814
Jacksonville, FL: 2,972
Detroit, MI: 2,883
San Antonio, TX: 2,883
Milwaukee, WI: 2,577
Austin, TX: 2,252
Charlotte, NC: 2,196
Columbus: 2,138
Kansas City, MO: 1,869
St. Louis, MO: 1,866
Indianapolis, IN: 1,813
Cleveland: 1,709
Nashville, TN: 1,637
San Jose, CA: 1,435
Portland, OR: 1,195
Cincinnati: 1,113
Minneapolis, MN: 983
Virginia Beach, VA: 955
Pittsburgh, PA: 947
Omaha, NE: 943
Orlando, FL: 931
Sacramento, CA: 861
Wichita, KS: 821
Toledo: 674
Madison, WI: 555
Providence, RI: 517
Akron: 461
Dayton: 415
Youngstown: 196
Canton: 163

Law Enforcement per 10,000 Residents, 2012
1. St. Louis: 58.6
2. Chicago: 47.1
3. Cleveland: 43.4
4. Milwaukee: 43.0
5. Detroit: 40.8
6. Kansas City: 40.3
7. Orlando: 37.8
8. Cincinnati: 37.6
9. Jacksonville: 35.4
10. Las Vegas: 32.5
11. Pittsburgh: 30.3
12. Youngstown: 29.4
13. Dayton: 29.2
14. Providence: 29.1
15. Charlotte: 27.2
16. Austin: 27.0
17. Columbus: 26.8
18. Nashville: 26.4
19. Minneapolis: 25.2
20. Toledo: 23.6
21. Madison: 23.4
22. Akron: 23.2
23. Omaha: 22.6
24. Canton: 22.4
25. Indianapolis: 21.6
26. Virginia Beach: 21.3
27. Wichita: 21.2
28. San Antonio: 20.9
29. Portland: 20.0
30. Sacramento: 18.1
31. San Jose: 14.7

So now that we know the size of the police force in these places, does the size have a correlation to crime rates?

Here is the violent crime rate for the same year as these stats, 2012. The rank for police force per 10K people is listed beside the violent crime ranking.

Violent Crime Rate per 100K People and Law Enforcement Rank per 10K People
1. Detroit: 2,122.9 #5
2. St. Louis: 1,776.5 #1
3. Cleveland: 1,383.8 #3
4. Milwaukee: 1,294.5 #4
5. Kansas City: 1,263.2 #6
6. Nashville: 1,216 #18
7. Indianapolis: 1,185.5 #25
8. Toledo: 1,171.9 #20
9. Orlando: 1,017.4 #7
10. Minneapolis: 992.2 #19
11. Cincinnati: 974.7 #8
12. Dayton: 973.7 #13
13. Akron: 886.6 #22
14. Youngstown: 809.2 #12
15. Las Vegas: 784 #10
16. Pittsburgh: 752 #11
17. Wichita: 742.5 #27
18. Sacramento: 738.6 #30
19. Charlotte: 647.9 #15
20. Providence: 636.9 #14
21. Columbus: 630 #17
22. Jacksonville: 617.3 #9
23. Omaha: 594.5 #23
24. Portland: 517.2 #29
25. San Antonio: 503.1 #28
26. Austin: 408.8 #16
27. Madison: 377.7 #21
28. San Jose: 363.3 #31
29. Virginia Beach: 169.4 #26
30. Canton: 28.6 #24
Chicago: N/A

Based on the ranking above, which cities are getting the best bang for their police force? That would be cities with a larger police force ranking (by at least 2 spots) than violent crime ranking. These would include: Orlando, Cincinnati, Youngstown, Las Vegas, Pittsburgh, Charlotte, Providence, Columbus, Jacksonville, Austin, Madison, Virginia Beach and Canton.

On the opposite end, the cities with failing police levels vs. violent crime include those places with a higher violent crime ranking than police ranking (by at least 2 spots). Those are: Detroit, Nashville, Indianapolis, Toledo, Minneapolis, Akron, Wichita, Sacramento, Portland, San Antonio and San Jose.

Finally, the cities with violent crime ranked about where their police size is include St. Louis, Cleveland, Milwaukee, St. Louis, Kansas City, Dayton and Omaha.

So Columbus is in the best category. Its violent crime ranking is 4 spots lower than its law enforcement ranking size, meaning that police in Columbus are performing better than average. Let’s just hope they’re doing the right, legal thing when policing.

For more information and other cities, large and small, check out this link: http://www.governing.com/topics/public-justice-safety/gov-cities-with-the-greatest-police-presence-most-officers-per-capita.html

State GDP 2014

New state-level GDP figures were recently released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. Where does Ohio stand?

First, let’s look at the top 20 states for total GDP in 2014

2014 Total, in Millions
1. California: 2,311,616
2. Texas: 1,648,036
3. New York: 1,404,518
4. Florida: 839,944
5. Illinois: 745,875
6. Pennsylvania: 662,890
7. Ohio: 583,261
8. New Jersey: 549,099
9. North Carolina: 483,126
10. Georgia: 476,483
11. Virginia: 463,613
12. Massachusetts: 459,937
13. Michigan: 451,516
14. Washington: 427,052
15. Maryland: 348,631
16. Indiana: 317,840
17. Minnesota: 316,204
18. Colorado: 306,663
19. Tennessee: 300,604
20. Wisconsin: 292,891

Ohio maintained its 7th-place position through 2014.
Now let’s look at the 20 states that had the biggest increases.

Total GDP Growth in Millions 2013-2014
1. California: +98,625
2. Texas: +90,843
3. New York: +62,927
4. Florida: +39,247
5. Pennsylvania: +22,596
6. Illinois: +21,080
7. Ohio: +20,416
8. Georgia: +20,000
9. Washington: +19,892
10. Massachusetts: +18,470
11. Colorado: +18,325
12. Michigan: +16,842
13. North Carolina: +16,051
14. New Jersey: +11,703
15. Oregon: +10,810
16. Tennessee: +10,479
17. Arizona: +9,422
18. Maryland: +9,222
19. Minnesota: +8,934
20. Virginia: +8,629

So Ohio is growing at the same position as its overall ranking. No states below it are set to pass it anytime in the near future. In fact, the gap is widening from its nearest threats.

What about per-capita GDP, which is a measure of the state’s total GDP divided by its population?

Per-Capita GDP, in Dollars 2014
1. Alaska: 66,160
2. North Dakota: 65,225
3. New York: 64,818
4. Connecticut: 64,676
5. Wyoming: 64,309
6. Massachusetts: 63,005
7. Delaware: 60,551
8. New Jersey: 56,405
9. Washington: 55,298
10. California: 54,462
11. Texas: 54,433
12. Maryland: 53,759
13. Illinois: 52,827
14. Minnesota: 52,801
15. Nebraska: 52,724
16. Colorado: 52,214
17. Virginia: 51,338
18. Oregon: 51,329
19. New Hampshire: 49,951
20. Hawaii: 49,686

27. Ohio: 45,887

Ohio is in the bottom half. Not great, as it indicates that it’s actually underperforming in GDP given its population.

So there you have it, a quick 2014 GDP update. To find out more, check out the BEA site at http://www.bea.gov/index.htm It has tons of economic information for states and metro areas.

Columbus: 2014 Population Estimates and the Future

In the recent 2014 city population estimates, Columbus remained the 15th largest in the United States. I wanted to take a look at how it is doing compared to other large
national cities along with Midwest peers.

July 1, 2014 City Population Estimate by National Rank
1. New York, NY: 8,491,079
2. Los Angeles, CA: 3,928,864
3. Chicago, IL: 2,722,389
4. Houston, TX: 2,239,558
5. Philadelphia, PA: 1,560,297
6. Phoenix, AZ: 1,537,058
7. San Antonio, TX: 1,436,697
8. San Diego, CA: 1,381,069
9. Dallas, TX: 1,281,047
10. San Jose, CA: 1,015,785
11. Austin, TX: 912,791
12. Jacksonville, FL: 853,382
13. San Francisco, CA: 852,469
14. Indianapolis: 848,788
15. Columbus: 835,957
16. Ft. Worth, TX: 812,238
17. Charlotte, NC: 809,958
18. Detroit, MI: 680,250
19. El Paso, TX: 679,036
20. Seattle, WA: 668,342
21. Denver, CO: 663,862
22. Washington, DC: 658,893
23. Memphis, TN: 656,861
24. Boston, MA: 655,884
25. Nashville, TN: 644,014
26. Baltimore, MD: 622,793
27. Oklahoma City, OK: 620,602
28. Portland, OR: 619,360
29. Las Vegas, NV: 613,599
30. Louisville, KY: 612,780
31. Milwaukee, WI: 599,642
32. Albuquerque, NM: 557,169
33. Tucson, AZ: 527,972
34. Fresno, CA: 515,986
35. Sacramento, CA: 485,199
36. Long Beach, CA: 473,577
37. Kansas City, MO : 470,800
38. Mesa, AZ: 464,704
39. Atlanta, GA: 464,704
40. Virginia Beach, VA: 450,980
41. Omaha, NE: 446,599
42. Colorado Springs, CO: 445,830
43. Raleigh, NC: 439,896
44. Miami, FL: 430,332
45. Oakland, CA: 413,775
46. Minneapolis, MN: 407,207
47. Tulsa, OK: 399,682
48. Cleveland: 389,521
49. Wichita, KS: 388,413
50. New Orleans, LA: 384,320
60. St. Louis, MO: 317,419
62. Pittsburgh, PA: 305,412
65. Cincinnati: 298,165
66. St. Paul, MN: 297,640
68. Toledo, OH: 281,031
72. Lincoln, NE: 272,996
73. Orlando, FL: 262,372
77. Fort Wayne, IN: 258,522
83. Madison, WI: 245,691
105. Des Moines, IA: 209,220
118. Akron: 197,859
183. Dayton: 141,003
472. Canton: 72,297
545. Youngstown: 65,062


Total Population Change 2013-2014 and Census 2010-2014 in ()

1. New York, NY: +52,700 (+316,120)
2. Houston, TX: +35,752 (+142,897)
3. Los Angeles, CA: +30,924 (+136,207)
4. Austin, TX: +25,667 (+101,333)
5. San Antonio, TX: +24,931 (+109,141)
6. Phoenix, AZ: +24,616 (+89,441)
7. San Diego, CA: +21,225 (+79,448)
8. Dallas, TX: +20,322 (+83,255)
9. Fort Worth, TX: +18,183 (+70,178)
10. Charlotte, NC: +16,007 (+74,200)
11. Denver, CO: +15,461 (+63,837)
12. Seattle, WA: +14,938 (+59,684)
13. Columbus: +12,421 (+47,303)
14. San Jose, CA: +11,964 (+63,225)
15. San Francisco, CA: +11,331 (+47,274)
16. Las Vegas, NV: +9,929 (+29,359)
17. Portland, OR: +9,840 (+35,571)
18. Washington, DC: +9,782 (+57,126)
19. Oklahoma City, OK: +9,572 (+40,594)
20. Jacksonville, FL: +9,368 (+31,598)
21. Nashville, TN: +9,144 (+40,508)
22. Miami, FL: +8,969 (+30,824)
23. Raleigh, NC: +8,179 (+35,925)
24. Atlanta, GA: +7,593 (+34,746)
25. Orlando, FL: +6,940 (+23,538)
26. Minneapolis, MN: +6,560 (+24,608)
27. Mesa, AZ: +6,357 (+24,839)
28. Oakland, CA: +6,108 (+22,870)
29. Boston, MA: +5,967 (+38,204)
30. Fresno, CA: +5,698 (+19,906)
31. Colorado Springs, CO: +5,693 (+28,489)
32. Omaha, NE: +5,552 (+23,272)
33. Indianapolis, IN: +5,413 (+28,347)
34. New Orleans, LA: +5,314 (+40,491)
35. Sacramento, CA: +4,975 (+18,711)
36. Philadelphia, PA: +4,245 (+34,291)
37. Lincoln, NE: +4,041 (+14,528)
38. Kansas City, MO: +3,547 (+11,013)
39. Madison, WI: +2,479 (+12,362)
40. Louisville, KY: +2,305 (+15,515)
41. El Paso, TX: +2,245 (+29,903)
42. St. Paul, MN: +2,209 (+12,572)
43. Long Beach, CA: +2,097 (+11,320)
44. Virginia Beach, VA: +1,672 (+13,014)
45. Fort Wayne, IN: +1,658 (+4,822)
46. Des Moines, IA: +1,565 (+5,034)
47. Tucson, AZ: +1,450 (+7,411)
48. Wichita, KS: +1,361 (+6,027)
49. Tulsa, OK: +1,278 (+7,760)
50. Cincinnati: +547 (+1,215)
51. Albuquerque, NM: +336 (+10,809)
52. Milwaukee, WI: +139 (+4,904)
53. Chicago, IL: +82 (+26,791)
54. Canton: -267 (-720)
55. Akron: -299 (-1,233)
56. Youngstown: -431 (-1,920)
57. Baltimore, MD: -611 (+1,672)
58. Dayton: -897 (-758)
59. St. Louis, MO: -1,077 (-1,946)
60. Pittsburgh, PA: -1,314 (-290)
61. Toledo: -1,602 (-6,175)
62. Cleveland: -1,635 (-7,176)
63. Memphis, TN: -1,647 (+5,003)
64. Detroit, MI: -6,424 (-33,612)

Columbus was the 13th fastest growing major city from 2013-2014, and the 15th fastest-growing from the 2010 Census to 2014. It was also the fastest-growing Midwestern city and the 2nd fastest-growing outside of the South and West, behind only New York.

But what about future population rankings? Currently, Columbus is 15th largest, but what about by 2020 and beyond? It’s difficult to project population out very far because rates can change significantly over time. Assuming that all cities grow at the same rate through say, 2030, where might Columbus be?

The chart is somewhat difficult to read, so let me explain. Each city has projected numbers for each 5-year period starting at 2015 and going to 2035. You can rank the cities by looking at where the numbers are on the chart relative to each other. Here is Columbus’ ranking on the chart:

2015: 6th, behind Austin, San Francisco, San Jose, Jacksonville and Indianapolis. It would remain 15th place nationally.
2020: 5th, behind Austin, Fort Worth, San Francisco and San Jose. It would rank 14th place nationally.
2025: 6th, behind Austin, Forth Worth, Charlotte, San Francisco and San Jose. It would rank 15th place nationally.
2030: 5th, behind Austin, Fort Worth, Charlotte and San Jose. It would rank 14th nationally.
2035: 5th, again behind Austin, Fort Worth, Charlotte and San Jose. It would remain ranked 14th nationally.

So it seems Columbus may actually move up on the list a spot over time. If any cities slow down or speed up, obviously that could change.

2014 City Population Estimates

The Census has released new estimates for July 1, 2013-July 1, 2014 for all 100 incorporated places of the metro area.

Total Population July 1, 2014
1. Columbus: 835,957
2. Newark (Licking): 47,839
3. Dublin: 44,214
4. Lancaster (Fairfield): 39,595
5. Grove City: 38,519
6. Westerville: 37,667
7. Delaware (Delaware): 37,372
8. Reynoldsburg: 36,711
9. Upper Arlington: 34,609
10. Gahanna: 34,257
11. Hilliard: 32,465
12. Marysville (Union): 22,708
13. Pickerington (Fairfield): 19,408
14. Whitehall: 18,558
15. Pataskala (Licking): 15,192
16. Worthington: 14,384
17. Bexley: 13,517
18. Circleville (Pickaway): 13,455
19. Powell (Delaware): 12,511
20. Heath (Licking): 10,456
21. London (Madison): 10,056
22. New Albany: 9,202
23. Canal Winchester: 7,704
24. Grandview Heights: 7,244
25. Logan (Hocking): 7,154
26. Granville (Licking): 5,723
27. Groveport: 5,672
28. Sunbury (Delaware): 4,909
29. Johnstown (Licking): 4,870
30. New Lexington (Perry): 4,717
31. Obetz: 4,706
32. Plain City (Madison): 4,295
33. West Jefferson (Madison): 4,272
34. Ashville (Pickaway): 4,149
35. Mount Gilead (Morrow): 3,662
36. Baltimore (Fairfield): 2,962
37. Buckeye Lake (Licking): 2,737
38. Crooksville (Perry): 2,493
39. Hebron (Licking): 2,386
40. Richwood (Union): 2,251
41. Utica (Licking): 2,176
42. Cardington (Morrow): 2,054
43. South Bloomfield (Pickaway): 1,812
44. Mount Sterling (Madison): 1,748
45. Commercial Point (Pickaway): 1,599
46. Somerset (Perry): 1,461
47. Bremen (Fairfield): 1,436
48. Ashley (Delaware): 1,354
49. Minerva Park: 1,306
50. Lithopolis (Fairfield): 1,290
51. Hanover (Licking): 1,103
52. Millersport (Fairfield): 1,048
53. Williamsport (Pickaway): 1,043
54. Urbancrest: 1,011
55. Thornville (Perry): 992
56. Pleasantville (Fairfield): 958
57. New Holland (Pickaway): 832
58. Milford Center (Union): 813
59. Junction City (Perry): 809
60. Amanda (Fairfield): 748
61. Shawnee Hills (Delaware): 729
62. New Straitsville (Perry): 713
63. Galena (Delaware): 684
64. Ostrander (Delaware): 674
65. Shawnee (Perry): 645
66. Valleyview: 630
67. Thurston (Fairfield): 609
68. Marble Cliff: 581
69. Corning (Perry): 573
70. Riverlea: 564
71. Stoutsville (Fairfield): 564
72. Kirkersville (Licking): 536
73. Carroll (Fairfield): 521
74. Laurelville (Hocking): 521
75. Alexandria (Licking): 518
76. Murray City (Hocking): 440
77. Edison (Morrow): 438
78. Sugar Grove (Fairfield): 429
79. Hartford (Licking): 400
80. St. Louisville (Licking): 374
81. South Solon (Madison): 361
82. Marengo (Morrow): 346
83. Harrisburg: 331
84. Midway (Madison): 327
85. Rushville (Fairfield): 304
86. Orient (Pickaway): 275
87. Magnetic Springs (Union): 273
88. Fulton (Morrow): 261
89. Lockbourne: 245
90. Unionville Center (Union): 236
91. Chesterville (Morrow): 231
92. Tarlton (Pickaway): 288
93. Darbyville (Pickaway): 226
94. Gratiot (Licking): 223
95. Glenford (Perry): 176
96. Sparta (Morrow): 163
97. Hemlock (Perry): 155
98. West Rushville (Fairfield): 135
99. Brice: 120
100. Rendville (Perry): 36

Total Change July 1st 2013-July 1, 2014 and Census 2010-July 1, 2014 in ()

1. Columbus: +12,241 (+48,924)
2. Hilliard: +1,458 (+4,030)
3. Grove City: +1,000 (+2,944)
4. Delaware: +764 (+2,619)
5. Dublin: +585 (+2,463)
6. Worthington: +522(+809)
7. New Albany: +373 (+1,478)
8. Pickerington: +356 (+1,117)
9. Powell: +279 (+1,011)
10. Lancaster: +279 (+815)
11. Grandview Heights: +273 (+708)
12. Marysville: +262 (+614)
13. Gahanna: +190 (+1,009)
14. Reynoldsburg: +186 (+818)
15. Sunbury: +179 (+520)
16. Canal Winchester: +162 (+603)
17. Upper Arlington: +141 (+838)
18. Westeville: +115 (+1,547)
19. London: +90 (+152)
20. Circleville: +84 (+141)
21. Lithopolis: +68 (+184)
22. Newark: +65 (+266)
23. Plain City: +51 (+70)
24. Whitehall: +48 (+496)
25. Bexley: +46 (+460)
26. Logan: +42 (+2)
27. Johnstown: +41 (+238)
28. Hanover: +41 (+182)
29. West Jefferson: +41 (+50)
30. Groveport: +34 (+309)
31. Ashville: +31 (+52)
32. Pataskala: +26 (+230)
33. South Bloomfield: +26 (+68)
34. Urbancrest: +26 (+51)
35. Obetz: +25 (+174)
36. Hebron: +20 (+50)
37. Buckeye Lake: +19 (-9)
38. Utica: +17 (+44)
39. Mount Sterling: +17 (-34)
40. Heath: +16 (+146)
41. Galena: +15 (+31)
42. Ostrander: +15 (+31)
43. Commercial Point: +11 (+17)
44. Richwood: +9 (+22)
45. Williamsport: +9 (+20)
46. Baltimore: +8 (-4)
47. Cardington: +7 (+7)
48. Amanda: +6 (+11)
49. Millersport: +5 (+4)
50. New Holland: +4 (+31)
51. Milford Center: +4 (+21)
52. Bremen: +4 (+11)
53. Kirkersville: +4 (+11)
54. South Solon: +4 (+6)
55. Alexandria: +4 (+1)
56. Shawnee Hills: +3 (+48)
57. Minverva Park: +3 (+34)
58. Riverlea: +3 (+19)
59. Marble Cliff: +3 (+8)
60. Tarlton: +3 (+6)
61. Midway: +3 (+5)
62. Thurston: +3 (+5)
63. Ashley: +2 (+24)
64. Harrisburg: +2 (+11)
65. Magnetic Springs: +2 (+5)
66. Orient: +2 (+5)
67. Darbyville: +2 (+4)
68. Stoutsville: +2 (+4)
69. Sugar Grove: +2 (+3)
70. Pleasantville: +2 (-2)
71. Lockbourne: +1 (+8)
72. Brice: +1 (+6)
73. Marengo: +1 (+4)
74. Chesterville: +1 (+3)
75. Fulton: +1 (+3)
76. Hartford: +1 (+3)
77. Unionville Center: +1 (+3)
78. Gratiot: +1 (+2)
79. Mount Gilead: +1 (+2)
80. Rushville: +1 (+2)
81. St. Louisville: +1 (+1)
82. West Rushville: +1 (+1)
83. Laurelville: +1 (-6)
84. Valleyview: 0 (+10)
85. Glenford: 0 (+3)
86. Sparta: 0 (+2)
87. Thornville: 0 (+1)
88. Hemlock: 0 (0)
89. Rendville: 0 (0)
90. Carroll: 0 (-3)
91. Murray City: 0 (-9)
92. Edison: -1 (+1)
93. Granville: -2 (+77)
94. Corning: -3 (-10)
95. New Straitsville: -3 (-9)
96. Junction City: -4 (-10)
97. Shawnee: -4 (-10)
98. Somerset: -7 (-20)
99. Crooksville: -14 (-41)
100. New Lexington: -24 (-14)

Places growing 2013-2014: 83 of 100 or 83%.
Places growing 2010-2014: 84 of 100 or 84%.

Places that grew 2000-2010: 70 of 100 or 70%.

Columbus Walkability 2015, and the Flaws of WalkScore

WalkScore has update its rankings and numbers for US cities in terms of walkability, transit and bikes. https://www.walkscore.com/cities-and-neighborhoods/

Columbus does not rank all that highly for walkability. Here are the 2014 and 2015 numbers for comparison. Keep in mind that this is just one site’s ranking of walkability, and any changes may not actually mean much, if anything. In Columbus’ case, many urban neighborhoods which have been feverishly building infill have inexplicably had their numbers drop over the course of the year. This seems very strange, and highly unlikely that these areas actually became less walkable.

Top 25 Most Walkable Columbus Neighborhoods, 2014 and 2015
2014                                                                          2015
1. Downtown: 86——————————————1. Necko: 86
2. Dennison Place (Short North): 85———————-2. German Village: 85
3. Italian Village (Short North): 85———————3. Weinland Park: 84
4. Weinland Park (Just northeast of Short North): 85—–4. Schumacher Place: 84
5. Indiana Forest (Northeast Campus Area): 84————5. Italian Village: 84
6. Necko (South Campus): 81——————————6. Indiana Forest: 83
7. Victorian Village (Short North): 81——————-7. Victorian Village: 80
8. Old North Columbus: 80——————————–8. Dennison Place: 80
9. Glen Echo (North Columbus): 80————————9. OSU Campus: 78
10. North Campus: 80————————————-10. Iuka Ravine: 77
11. German Village: 79———————————–11. Downtown: 77
12. Tri-Village (5th Avenue West): 79——————–12. Brewery District: 76
13. Brewery District: 78———————————13. Tri-Village: 75
14. OSU Campus: 77—————————————14. Indianola Terrace: 75
15. Iuka Ravine (North Columbus): 76———————15. Clintonville: 74
16. Clintonville: 75————————————-16. King-Lincoln: 74
17: King-Lincoln (Near East Side): 74——————–17. Old North Columbus: 73
18. Schumacher Place (Near South Side): 73—————18. Olde Towne East: 71
19. Busch (Northwest Columbus): 72———————–19. Merion Village; 71
20. Indianola Terrace (North Columbus): 71—————20. North Campus: 70
21. Merion Village: 69———————————–21. Glen Echo: 69
22. Governours Square (Bethel and Henderson): 68———22. Livingston Park North: 67
23: Harrison West (Hilltop): 67————————–23. Southern Orchards: 67
24. Old Beechwold (North Columbus): 67——————-24. Mount Vernon: 66
25. Olde Towne East: 67———————————-25. Woodland Park: 64

So why might the numbers have gone down in so many urban areas that are seeing large amounts of infill and revitalization? Well, part of the methodology used to compute the WalkScores are US Census tract population data. The most recent Census estimates had large amounts of urban tracts losing population within the urban core, even in high-growth areas like the Short North and Downtown. If these incorrect estimates were incorporated, it might appear that such areas were in decline rather than in the rapid growth they are experiencing in reality, and that associated amenities are going down as well. There’s really no other explanation. The simple fact is, however, that these areas, with perhaps some exceptions, are NOT becoming less walkable, but more. This is a classic case of garbage in, garbage out. Columbus is not a particularly walkable city overall, by any means, but this data really has to be taken with a huge grain of salt.

Overall Columbus Neighborhood Walkability Score Breakdown, 2014 and 2015
2014       2015
90-100 (Walker’s Paradise): 0——–0
70-89 (Very Walkable): 20———–20
50-69 (Somewhat Walkable): 72——-37
0-49 (Car Dependent): 120———–155

Average Columbus Walkability Score, 2014 and 2015

2014: 47
2015: 40

Bike and Transit scores did improve over 2014, but they’re unrelated to population changes and amenities, which would indicate the real movement of Columbus rather than its walkability scores.

Bike Score Neighborhood Breakdown, 2014 and 2015
2014     2015
90-100: 0———0
70-89: 14———14
50-69: 45———45
0-49: 153———153

Average Columbus Bike Score, 2014 and 2015
2014: 45
2015: 46

Transit Score Neighborhood Breakdown, 2014 and 2015
2014     2015
90-100: 0——–0
70-89: 0———0
50-69: 11——–15
0-49: 201——–197

Average Columbus Transit Score, 2014 and 2015
2014: 29
2015: 30

Questions Answered: Columbus Malls and Shopping

In a semi-regular series, I will be attempting to answer questions or provide information based on popular searches on the site. In today’s addition, I will talk retail. I get a lot of searches for Columbus-area malls and shopping. I had to think about the best way to tackle this, because Columbus has so much retail- it’s considered to be one of the best cities per-capita for shopping.

Here is just a straight list of some of the major centers with all information I could find, as well as a Google Map location.

Major Malls
Eastland Mall
Opened: 1968 (Renovation 2003)
Address: 2740 Eastland Mall Site B, Columbus 43232
Phone: 614-861-3234
Hours: M-S: 10AM-9PM Sunday: 12PM-6PM
# of Retail Stores: 74
# of Restaurants/Eateries/Grocery: 6
Mall Website: www.eastlandmall.com
Google Map:

Easton Town Center
Opened: 1999 (Expansions in 2001, 2013 and 2014)
Address: 160 Easton Town Center, Columbus 43219
Phone: 614-416-7000
Hours: M-T: 10AM-9PM F-S: 10AM-10PM Sunday: 12PM-6PM
# of Retail Stores: 164
# of Restaurants/Eateries/Grocery: 56
Mall Website: www.eastontowncenter.com
Google Map:

The Mall at Tuttle Crossing
Built: 1997
Address: 5043 Tuttle Crossing Blvd, Dublin 43016
Phone: 614-717-9604
Hours: M-S: 10AM-9PM Sunday: 11AM-6PM
# of Retail Stores: 125+
# of Restaurants/Eateries/Grocery: 20+
Mall Website: www.simon.com/mall/the-mall-at-tuttle-crossing
Google Map:

Polaris Fashion Place
Opened: 2001 (Expansions/Renovations in 2008 and 2015)
Address: 1500 Polaris Parkway, Columbus 43240
Phone: 614-846-1500
Hours: M-T: 10AM-9PM F-S: 10AM-9:30PM Sunday: 12PM-6PM
# of Retail Stores: 200
# of Restaurants/Eateries/Grocery: 20
Mall Website: www.polarisfashionplace.com
Google Map:

Minor Malls/Retail Centers
Great Southern Shopping Center
Address: 3747 S. High Street, Columbus 43207
Phone: N/A
Hours: N/A
# of Retail Stores: 55
Website: N/A
Google Map: https://goo.gl/maps/nydnI

Lennox Town Center

Address: 1755 Olentangy River Road
Phone: 1-877-225-5337 (Management Company)
Hours: 9AM-5PM
# or Retail Stores: 15
Website: N/A
Google Map: https://goo.gl/maps/NNMsE

Northern Lights Shopping Center
Address: 3349-3561 Cleveland Avenue, Columbus 43224
Phone: 1-866-352-6468 (Management Company)
# of Retail Stores: 80
Website: www.dlcmgmt.com
Google Map: https://goo.gl/maps/XeK1o

The Shops at Worthington Place
Address: 7227 N. High Street, Worthington 43085
Phone: 614-841-1110
Hours: M-S: 10AM-8PM Sunday: 12PM-5PM
# of Retail Stores: 25+
# of Restaurants/Eateries/Grocery: 8
Website: http://shopworthingtonplace.com/
Google Map:

Town & Country Shopping Center
Address: 3772 E. Broad Street, Columbus 43213
Phone: N/A
Hours: N/A
# of Retail Stores: 55
Website: N/A
Google Map: https://goo.gl/maps/170yI

Winter 2014-2015: A Look Back- November 2014

While it’s still possible to get snow into April, winter is essentially over for one more year. For the second year in a row, winter was colder and snowier than normal, so let’s look at the monthly play-by-play as well as the final stats.

November 2014
First, a reminder of November normals.
High: 52.6
Low: 36.1
Mean: 44.4
Precipitation: 3.20″
Snowfall: 0.9″
Snow Depth: 0.0″

November 2014 Average High: 45.7
1878-2014 Ranking: 10th Coldest
Departure from Normal: -6.9

November 2014 Average Low: 30.0
1878-2014 Ranking: 6th Coldest
Departure from Normal: -6.1

November 2014 Mean Temperature: 37.8
1878-2014 Ranking: 7th Coldest
Departure from Normal: -6.6

Coldest November 2014 High: 19 on the 18th
1878-2014 Ranking: 5th Coldest
The 19 recorded on the 18th was the record coldest high ever recorded for the date, beating the previous 1903 record by a full 7 degrees!
Other near record low highs:
33 on the 17th. 3rd coldest daily high for the date.
27 on the 21st. 3rd coldest daily high for the date.

Coldest November 2014 Low: 12 on the 18th.
1878-2014 Ranking: 8th Coldest
The 12 recorded on the 18th was the 2nd coldest low ever recorded for the date.
Other near record lows:
13 on the 19th. 2nd coldest low for the date.
14 on the 21st. 2nd coldest low for the date.

Number of Highs 32 Degrees or Below: 4
1878-2014 Rank: 5th Highest

Number of Lows 32 Degrees or Below: 19
1878-2014 Rank: 4th Highest

November 2014 was clearly very cold historically, coming in as a top 10 coldest ever.

The month overall was rather dry, with just 1.46″ of precipitation, which was 1.74″ below normal. This was the 22nd driest November since 1878.

November 2014 Precipitation Days: 20
1″+ Daily Precipitation Days: 0
0.5″+ Daily Precipitation Days: 0
0.25″+ Daily Precipitation Days: 3

Snowfall, despite the dry month, came in at a bit above normal, at 4.1″. Still, this was the 15th snowiest November on record, as the graph shows.

Greatest November 2014 Daily Snowfall: 3.8″ on the 17th.
1878-2014 Rank: 10th Greatest
The 3.8″ on the 17th was also the 2nd highest total for the date.

Snowfall Days: 9
1″+ Snowfall Days: 1
2.5″+ Snowfall Days: 1
5″+ Snowfall Days: 0

Greatest Daily Snow Depth: 3″ on the 18th and 19th.
Average Monthly Snow Depth: 0.4″