Winter 2014-2015: A Look Back- November 2014

While it’s still possible to get snow into April, winter is essentially over for one more year. For the second year in a row, winter was colder and snowier than normal, so let’s look at the monthly play-by-play as well as the final stats.

November 2014
First, a reminder of November normals.
High: 52.6
Low: 36.1
Mean: 44.4
Precipitation: 3.20″
Snowfall: 0.9″
Snow Depth: 0.0″

November 2014 Average High: 45.7
1878-2014 Ranking: 10th Coldest
Departure from Normal: -6.9

November 2014 Average Low: 30.0
1878-2014 Ranking: 6th Coldest
Departure from Normal: -6.1

November 2014 Mean Temperature: 37.8
1878-2014 Ranking: 7th Coldest
Departure from Normal: -6.6

Coldest November 2014 High: 19 on the 18th
1878-2014 Ranking: 5th Coldest
The 19 recorded on the 18th was the record coldest high ever recorded for the date, beating the previous 1903 record by a full 7 degrees!
Other near record low highs:
33 on the 17th. 3rd coldest daily high for the date.
27 on the 21st. 3rd coldest daily high for the date.

Coldest November 2014 Low: 12 on the 18th.
1878-2014 Ranking: 8th Coldest
The 12 recorded on the 18th was the 2nd coldest low ever recorded for the date.
Other near record lows:
13 on the 19th. 2nd coldest low for the date.
14 on the 21st. 2nd coldest low for the date.

Number of Highs 32 Degrees or Below: 4
1878-2014 Rank: 5th Highest

Number of Lows 32 Degrees or Below: 19
1878-2014 Rank: 4th Highest

November 2014 was clearly very cold historically, coming in as a top 10 coldest ever.

The month overall was rather dry, with just 1.46″ of precipitation, which was 1.74″ below normal. This was the 22nd driest November since 1878.

November 2014 Precipitation Days: 20
1″+ Daily Precipitation Days: 0
0.5″+ Daily Precipitation Days: 0
0.25″+ Daily Precipitation Days: 3

Snowfall, despite the dry month, came in at a bit above normal, at 4.1″. Still, this was the 15th snowiest November on record, as the graph shows.

Greatest November 2014 Daily Snowfall: 3.8″ on the 17th.
1878-2014 Rank: 10th Greatest
The 3.8″ on the 17th was also the 2nd highest total for the date.

Snowfall Days: 9
1″+ Snowfall Days: 1
2.5″+ Snowfall Days: 1
5″+ Snowfall Days: 0

Greatest Daily Snow Depth: 3″ on the 18th and 19th.
Average Monthly Snow Depth: 0.4″

Cool Link of the Day: Columbus Less Religious Than Las Vegas?

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/this-is-the-most-godless-city-in-america-2015-03-24?siteid=yhoof2

According to this survey, yes. Columbus has more religiously unaffiliated residents in its metro than does Sin City!

In Ohio, Cincinnati and Cleveland were both ranked several points more religious than Columbus as well.

2014 Metro Area Population Estimates

Along with county estimates, metropolitan areas were also released.

Here is where Columbus stands along with all peers in the 1.5-2.5 million range, along with the Midwest’s largest.

Metro Area Population Ranking, Census 2010, July 1, 2013 and July 1, 2014

2010                                             2013                                   2014
1. Chicago, IL: 9,461,105 ——–1. Chicago: 9,544,796———–1. Chicago, IL: 9,554,598
2. Detroit, MI: 4,296,250———-2. Detroit, MI: 4,295,394——-2. Detroit, MI: 4,296,611
3. Minneapolis, MN: 3,348,859–3. Minneapolis: 3,461,434—3. Minneapolis: 3,495,176
4. St. Louis, MO: 2,787,701——4. St. Louis: 2,801,587——-4. St. Louis, MO: 2,806,207
5. Pittsburgh, PA: 2,356,285—–5. Pittsburgh: 2,360,565—–5. Charlotte, NC: 2,380,314
6. Portland, OR: 2,226,009—–6. Charlotte, NC: 2,337,339–6. Pittsburgh, PA: 2,355,968
7. Charlotte, NC: 2,217,012—-7. Portland, OR: 2,314,747—7. Portland, OR: 2,348,247
8. Sacramento, CA: 2,149,127-8. San Antonio: 2,282,201—8. San Antonio: 2,328,652
9. San Antonio, TX: 2,142,508-9. Orlando, FL: 2,271,083—-9. Orlando, FL: 2,321,418
10. Orlando, FL: 2,134,411-10. Sacramento: 2,217,515-10. Sacramento, CA: 2,244,397
11. Cincinnati: 2,114,580—11. Cincinnati: 2,138,536——–11. Cincinnati: 2,149,449
12. Cleveland: 2,077,240—-12. Cleveland: 2,065,328—12. Kansas City, MO: 2,071,133
13. Kansas City: 2,009,342–13. Kansas City: 2,055,351–13. Las Vegas, NV: 2,069,681
14. Las Vegas: 1,951,269–14. Las Vegas, NV: 2,029,316—14. Cleveland: 2,063,598
15. Columbus: 1,901,974—-15. Columbus: 1,969,032——-15. Columbus: 1,994,536
16. Indianapolis, IN: 1,887,877–16. Indianapolis: 1,953,146–16. Indianapolis: 1,971,274
17. San Jose, CA: 1,836,911–17. San Jose, CA: 1,928,701–17. San Jose: 1,952,872
18. Austin, TX: 1,716,289—–18. Austin, TX: 1,885,803——18. Austin, TX: 1,943,299
19. Virginia Beach: 1,676,822–19. Nashville, TN: 1,758,577–19. Nashville: 1,792,649
20. Nashville: 1,670,890–20. Virginia Beach: 1,707,385–20. Virginia Beach: 1,716,624
21. Providence, RI: 1,600,852–21. Providence: 1,605,521–21. Providence: 1,609,367
22. Milwaukee, WI: 1,555,908–22. Milwaukee: 1,570,167—22. Milwaukee: 1,572,245
23. Grand Rapids: 988,938-23. Grand Rapids: 1,017,247-23. Grand Rapids: 1,027,703
24. Omaha, NE: 865,350—-24. Omaha, NE: 895,573——24. Omaha, NE: 904,421
25. Dayton: 799,232———-25. Dayton: 801,645————-25. Dayton: 800,836
26. Akron: 703,200———–26. Akron: 703,210—————26. Akron: 703,825
27. Wichita, KS: 630,919—-27. Wichita, KS: 638,259——27. Wichita, KS: 641,076
28. Toledo: 610,001———-28. Madison, WI: 627,466—–28. Madison, WI: 633,787
29. Madison, WI: 605,435–29. Toledo, OH: 608,430——29. Des Moines, IA: 611,549
30. Des Moines, IA: 569,633–30. Des Moines, IA: 600,086–30. Toledo, OH: 607,456
31. Youngstown: 565,773–31. Youngstown: 556,129—–31. Youngstown: 553,263

Total Births Census 2010 to July 1, 2014
Chicago, IL: 516,295
Detroit, MI: 212,571
Minneapolis, MN: 192,866
Charlotte, NC: 125,143
Kansas City, MO: 117,872
Portland, OR: 117,482
Cincinnati: 117,072
Sacramento, CA: 116,893
Orlando, FL: 114,387
Columbus: 113,392
Indianapolis, IN: 113,127
Las Vegas, NV: 111,857
Austin, TX: 107,591
San Jose, CA: 105,447
Pittsburgh, PA: 100,888
Cleveland: 98,504
Virginia Beach, VA: 96,734
Nashville, TN: 96,440
Milwaukee, WI: 84,990
Providence, RI: 70,850
Grand Rapids, MI: 57,551
Omaha, NE: 55,860
Dayton: 40,683
Wichita, KS: 40,276
Des Moines, IA: 36,423
Akron: 32,228
Toledo: 32,024
Madison, WI: 31,280
Youngstown: 23,686

Total Deaths Census 2010 to July 1, 2014
Chicago, IL: 289,440
Detroit, MI: 166,387
Pittsburgh, PA: 114,531
Minneapolis, MN: 90,773
Cleveland: 88,446
Cincinnati: 77,345
Charlotte, NC: 71,315
Kansas City, MO: 68,102
Sacramento, CA: 67,943
Portland, OR: 67,820
Orlando, FL: 65,979
Indianapolis, IN: 64,207
Columbus: 62,011
Providence, RI: 61,604
Las Vegas, NV: 60,256
Nashville, TN: 55,846
Virginia Beach, VA: 55,425
Milwaukee, WI: 55,123
San Jose, CA: 41,927
Austin, TX: 36,873
Dayton: 33,636
Grand Rapids, MI: 30,324
Youngstown: 29,196
Akron: 29,040
Omaha, NE: 26,829
Toledo: 24,226
Wichita, KS: 23,025
Des Moines, IA: 17,602
Madison, WI: 17,069

Total Natural Change Census 2010 to July 1, 2014
Chicago, IL: 226,855
Minneapolis, MN: 102,093
Austin, TX: 70,718
San Jose, CA: 63,520
Charlotte, NC: 53,828
Las Vegas, NV: 51,601
Columbus: 51,381
Kansas City, MO: 49,770
Portland, OR: 49,662
Sacramento, CA: 48,950
Indianapolis, IN: 48,920
Orlando, FL: 48,708
Detroit, MI: 46,184
Virginia Beach, VA: 41,309
Nashville, TN: 40,594
Cincinnati: 39,727
Milwaukee, WI: 29,867
Omaha, NE: 29,031
Grand Rapids, MI: 27,227
Des Moines, IA: 18,821
Wichita, KS: 17,251
Madison, WI: 14,211
Cleveland: 10,058
Providence, RI: 9,246
Toledo: 7,798
Dayton: 7,047
Akron: 3,188
Youngstown: -5,510
Pittsburgh, PA: -13,643

Total Domestic Migration Census 2010 to July 1, 2014
Austin, TX: 126,296
Charlotte, NC: 83,305
Orlando, FL: 72,735
Nashville, TN: 63,477
Portland, OR: 48,793
Las Vegas, NV: 35,289
Columbus: 20,083
Indianapolis, IN: 16,744
Des Moines, IA: 16,559
Sacramento, CA: 15,658
Madison, WI: 6,901
Grand Rapids, MI: 5,372
Pittsburgh, PA: 4,053
Omaha, NE: 2,869
Minneapolis, MN: -934
Kansas City, MO: -1,948
Akron: -6,490
Youngstown: -7,347
Dayton: -10,873
Wichita, KS: -11,148
Toledo: -13,337
San Jose, CA: -15,335
Cincinnati: -18,334
Providence, RI: -21,325
Milwaukee, WI: -22,597
Virginia Beach, VA: -24,374
Cleveland: -38,424
Detroit, MI: -89,649
Chicago, IL: -237,666

Total International Migration Census 2010 to July 1, 2014
Chicago, IL: 108,320
San Jose, CA: 69,894
Orlando, FL: 63,215
Minneapolis, MN: 46,328
Detroit, MI: 44,614
Las Vegas, NV: 29,440
Sacramento, CA: 29,435
Austin, TX: 25,762
Charlotte, NC: 23,114
Virginia Beach, VA: 23,092
Portland, OR: 22,042
Columbus: 21,574
Providence, RI: 21,170
Indianapolis, IN: 17,623
Nashville, TN: 16,204
Cleveland: 16,010
Kansas City, MO: 14,569
Cincinnati: 14,567
Pittsburgh, PA: 12,887
Milwaukee, WI: 9,968
Omaha, NE: 7,897
Madison, WI: 6,706
Grand Rapids, MI: 6,232
Dayton: 6,200
Des Moines, IA: 6,159
Akron: 4,599
Wichita, KS: 4,006
Toledo: 2,971
Youngstown: 1,088

Total Migration Census 2010 to July 1, 2014
Austin, TX: 152,058
Orlando, FL: 135,950
Charlotte, NC: 106,419
Nashville, TN: 79,681
Portland, OR: 70,835
Las Vegas, NV: 64,729
San Jose, CA: 54,559
Minneapolis, MN: 45,394
Sacramento, CA: 45,093
Columbus: 41,657
Indianapolis, IN: 34,367
Des Moines, IA: 22,718
Pittsburgh, PA: 16,940
Madison, WI: 13,607
Kansas City, MO: 12,621
Grand Rapids, MI: 11,604
Omaha, NE: 10,766
Providence, RI: -155
Virginia Beach, VA: -1,282
Akron: -1,891
Cincinnati: -3,767
Dayton: -4,673
Youngstown: -6,259
Wichita, KS: -7,142
Toledo: -10,366
Milwaukee, WI: -12,629
Cleveland: -22,414
Detroit, MI: -45,035
Chicago, IL: -129,346

Total Population Change Census 2010 to July 1, 2014
Austin, TX: 226,996
Orlando, FL: 187,012
Charlotte, NC: 163,066
Minneapolis, MN: 146,319
Portland, OR: 122,236
Nashville, TN: 121,749
Las Vegas, NV: 118,412
San Jose, CA: 115,931
Sacramento, CA: 95,254
Chicago, IL: 93,061
Columbus: 92,521
Indianapolis, IN: 83,192
Kansas City, MO: 61,795
Des Moines, IA: 41,916
Virginia Beach, VA: 39,807
Omaha, NE: 39,071
Grand Rapids, MI: 38,763
Cincinnati: 34,694
Madison, WI: 28,350
Milwaukee, WI: 16,291
Wichita, KS: 10,157
Providence, RI: 8,151
Dayton: 1,620
Akron: 618
Detroit, MI: 298
Pittsburgh, PA: -317
Toledo: -2,545
Youngstown: -12,541
Cleveland: -13,648

Out of the 31 peer and Midwest metros, Columbus had the 7th highest natural growth, the 10th highest migration rate and the 11th highest overall growth rate.

2014 County Population Estimates

New county population estimates were released Thursday. Franklin County had its 2nd highest growth year since 1970 and within a few years of passing Cuyahoga County to become the most populated in Ohio.

Top 25 Largest Ohio Counties and Rank for Census 2010, July 1, 2013 and July 1, 2014
2010                                  2013                                2014
1. Cuyahoga: 1,280,122–1. Cuyahoga: 1,265,889–1. Cuyahoga: 1,259,828
2. Franklin: 1,163,414—–2. Franklin: 1,213,834——2. Franklin: 1,231,393
3. Hamilton: 802,374——3. Hamilton: 804,429——-3. Hamilton: 806,631
4. Summit: 541,781——–4. Summit: 541,787———4. Summit: 541,943
5. Montgomery: 535,153–5. Montgomery: 534,764–5. Montgomery: 533,116
6. Lucas: 441,815———-6. Lucas: 436,803———–6. Lucas: 435,286
7. Stark: 375,586———–7. Stark: 375,222————7. Stark: 375,736
8. Butler: 368,130———-8. Butler: 371,511————8. Butler: 374,158
9. Lorain: 301,356———-9. Lorain: 303,306———–9. Lorain: 304,216
10. Mahoning: 238,823—10. Mahoning: 234,336—-10. Mahoning: 233,204
11. Lake: 230,041———-11. Lake: 229,634———–11. Lake: 229,230
12. Warren: 212,693——-12. Warren: 219,578——-12. Warren: 221,659
13. Trumbull: 210,312—–13. Trumbull: 206,480——13. Trumbull: 205,175
14. Clermont: 197,363—–14. Clermont: 200,254—–14. Clermont: 201,560
15. Delaware: 174,214—-15. Delaware: 185,202—–15. Delaware: 189,113
16. Medina: 172,332——-16. Medina: 174,792——–16. Medina: 176,029
17. Licking: 166,492——–17. Licking: 168,503——–17. Licking: 169,390
18. Greene: 161,573——-18. Greene: 163,465——–18. Greene: 163,820
19. Portage: 161,419——-19. Portage: 161,423——-19. Portage: 161,882
20. Fairfield: 146,156——-20. Fairfield: 148,797——-20. Fairfield: 150,381
21. Clark: 138,333———-21. Clark: 136,803———–21. Clark: 136,554
22. Wood: 125,488———22. Wood: 129,209———-22. Wood: 129,590
23. Richland: 124,475—–23. Richland: 122,292——23. Richland: 121,942
24. Wayne: 114,520——-24. Wayne: 115,144———24. Wayne: 115,537
25. Columbiana: 107,841–25. Columbiana: 105,885–25. Columbiana: 105,686

Top 25 Counties with the Largest Numerical Growth, July 1, 2013 to July 1, 2014
1. Franklin: +17,559
2. Delaware: +3,911
3. Butler: +2,647
4. Hamilton: +2,202
5. Warren: +2,081
6. Fairfield: +1,584
7. Clermont: +1,306
8. Lorain: +1,210
9. Licking: +887
10. Madison: +646
11. Stark: +514
12. Miami: +484
13. Portage: +459
14. Pickaway: +410
15. Union: +396
16. Wayne: +393
17. Wood: +381
18. Greene: +355
19. Knox: +244
20. Holmes: +236
21. Geauga: +236
22. Athens: +198
23. Fulton: +162
24. Summit: +156
25. Muskingum: +122

Top 25 Counties with the Largest Numerical Growth, Census 2010 to July 1, 2014
1. Franklin: +67,850
2. Delaware: +14,924
3. Warren: +8,791
4. Butler: +6,028
5. Hamilton: +4,257
6. Fairfield: +4,229
7. Clermont: +4,197
8. Wood: +4,102
9. Medina: +3,696
10. Licking: +2,906
11. Lorain: +2,860
12. Greene: +2,251
13. Holmes: +1,532
14. Union: +1,509
15. Miami: +1,394
16. Pickaway: +1,178
17. Wayne: +1,023
18. Geauga: +885
19. Hancock: +555
20. Madison: +488
21. Portage: +461
22. Morrow: +325
23. Knox: +237
24. Tuscarawas: +206
25. Summit: +157

Top 25 Counties for Total Birth July 1, 2013 to July 1, 2014
1. Franklin: 18,595
2. Cuyahoga: 14,801
3. Hamilton: 11,009
4. Montgomery: 6,708
5. Summit: 6,235
6. Lucas: 5,742
7. Butler: 4,572
8. Stark: 4,106
9. Lorain: 3,340
10. Warren: 2,396
11. Mahoning: 2,369
12. Clermont: 2,357
13. Lake: 2,204
14. Delaware: 2,119
15. Trumbull: 2,070
16. Licking: 1,948
17. Greene: 1,757
18. Medina: 1,732
19. Fairfield: 1,647
20. Clark: 1,567
21. Wayne: 1,501
22. Richland: 1,413
23. Wood: 1,370
24. Portage: 1,369
25. Allen: 1,288

Top 25 Counties for Total Deaths July 1, 2013 to July 1, 2014

1. Cuyahoga: 13,316
2. Franklin: 9,197
3. Hamilton: 7,718
4. Montgomery: 5,632
5. Summit: 5,595
6. Lucas: 4,365
7. Stark: 3,910
8. Butler: 3,186
9. Mahoning: 2,957
10. Trumbull: 2,407
11. Lake: 2,366
12. Warren: 1,636
13. Clark: 1,631
14. Clermont: 1,574
15. Licking: 1,505
16. Medina: 1,352
17. Greene: 1,350
18. Portage: 1,329
19. Richland: 1,313
20. Fairfield: 1,233
21. Columbiana: 1,140
22. Ashtabula: 1,092
23. Allen: 1,063
24. Wayne: 1,055
25. Delaware: 1,019

Top 25 Counties for Total Natural Change (Births vs. Deaths) July 1, 2013 to July 1, 2014

1. Franklin: 9,398
2. Hamilton: 3,291
3. Cuyahoga: 1,481
4. Lucas: 1,377
5. Butler: 1,386
6. Delaware: 1,100
7. Montgomery: 1,076
8. Clermont: 783
9. Warren: 760
10. Summit: 640
11. Lorain: 546
12. Holmes: 506
13. Wayne: 446
14. Licking: 443
15. Fairfield: 414
16. Greene: 407
17. Medina: 380
18. Wood: 359
19. Union: 271
20. Hancock: 249
21. Allen: 225
22. Shelby: 212
23. Geauga: 199
24. Stark: 196
25. Huron: 165

Columbus Slowly Becoming Ohio’s Largest Job Market- In One Graph

The Columbus metro has long been Ohio’s 3rd largest labor market, but that seems to be changing over time.

The January 2015 labor force jumped to a record high, and if trends hold, may pass the other 2 Cs by the end of the year.

Cool Link of the Day: Demographics by Distance

http://statchatva.org/changing-shape-of-american-cities/

This link, entitled The Changing Shape of American Cities, gives comparison maps for multi-demographic data points between 1990 and 2012 for dozens of cities, including Columbus. It gives this demographic information by breaking it down by the status at the mile distance from “City Hall”, or from the center of each city’s downtown area.

Using these graphs, here are some examples of the information we can see for Columbus’s immediate downtown.

% of Population with a Bachelor’s Degree at Mile 0
1990: 26%
2012: 51%

% of Population Aged 22-34 at Mile 0
1990: 32%
2012: 38%

% of Population Living Below the Poverty Line at Mile 0
1990: 30%
2012: 27%

Check out these and lots more.



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Columbus Area Murders by Zip Code 2008-2014

**Reposted with updated maps.

I have been wanting to do these maps for awhile now, as there have been several searches on the site for them and they weren’t available. It took a lot of work, but here they are!

2008

In 2008, almost all murders were contained within the I-270 boundaries. The East and South Sides were the worst areas.

2009

In 2009, there began to be a bit of diffusion on where murder was taking place. While parts of the urban core remained the worst areas, suburban areas also saw the occasional murder.

2010

The diffusion continued in 2010.

2011

And in 2011.

2012

2012 was the most diffuse of all the years, with no heavily concentrated areas, even in the urban core as much. Meanwhile, most of the suburban zip codes within Franklin County saw at least 1 murder.

2013

2014

The only conclusion that may be able to be drawn from these maps is that the urban core appears to be gradually having fewer murders, and that the further out areas are either increasing or staying steady. Meaning that the core is getting safer, while outer areas are maintaining or increasing their murder rates.

Year in Review: 2014 Housing Stats

In terms of housing in the Columbus area, the big story of 2014 housing was that there simply weren’t that many places for sale. The housing supply was consistently lower than demand throughout the year, pushing prices higher in every month.

Here are the final numbers for the 22 Columbus area markets that I looked at.

Random Columbus Photos #2

Photo Date: Unknown, Pre-1910
Location: The southeastern corner watchtower of the Ohio Penitentiary site.

The old Ohio Penitentiary first opened up in 1834. The most iconic building of the complex was that which lined West Spring Street and built during the Civil War. It can be seen in the background of the photo as the light building. The Ohio Pen had an interesting, and occasionally disastrous, life. On April 21, 1930, a massive fire broke out that would kill 322 inmates and become the worst prison fire in United State history. At its peak in 1955, the prison held over 5,200 inmates. After that year, the prison population steadily declined, and in 1984, the prison transferred its final inmates to other facilities, effectively ceasing operations. About 12 years later, a portion of the outer wall collapsed onto some cars, and the city began to aggressively plan a new life for the site. In 1998, despite some protests to save some of the historic buildings, the entire complex was demolished to make way for new development as part of the Arena District. Today, the only reminder of the prison site is that the eastern edge of McPherson Commons park runs along the same line as the original outer wall.

Year in Review 2014: March-May

Development News
March
-Plans were announced to redevelop Poindexter Village with 350 residential units, as well as community center and park space.
http://www.columbusunderground.com/poindexter-plan-calls-for-350-multi-family-units-urban-farm-bw1
-A new brewery announced it would be moving into space on West Town Street in Franklinton.
http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/blog/2014/03/land-grant-brewing-finally-finds-home.html
-A new 42-unit residential development was announced for Downtown Dublin.
http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/blog/2014/03/crawford-hoying-planning-42-luxury.html
-101 residential units were proposed for 991 Dennison Avenue in Victorian Village.
http://www.columbusunderground.com/new-five-story-101-unit-apartment-building-proposed-for-victorian-village
-Columbus announced plans to use $2.5 billion to build infrastructure to reduce runoff and pollution issues, including creating water gardens and new parks across the city.
http://www.columbusunderground.com/green-infrastructure-and-neighborhood-pocket-parks-part-of-blueprint-columbus-plan-bw1
-Reeb Elementary on the South Side was announced to be turned into a community center.
http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2014/03/21/south-side-community-center-gets-go-ahead.html
-New caps, similar to the existing retail cap on High Street over I-670 were announced to be in the works as part of the 70/71 rebuild. The caps would replace the highway bridges on S. High and S. Third between Downtown and German Village.
http://www.columbusunderground.com/caps-planned-for-high-and-third-street-bridges-south-of-downtown-bw1

April
-A vacant 1880s building a 140 N. Grant was announced to be renovated into mixed-use and residential.
http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2014/04/10/former-inkling-printing-building-on-east-long-to.html
-40 units of affordable housing was proposed for vacant buildings at Long and Front Downtown.
http://www.columbusunderground.com/forums/topic/affordable-housing-development-proposed-at-long-front-downtown
-Plans to renovate the Citizens Building at the southwest corner of Gay and High Downtown were announced, as well as building a new mixed-use building on the northwest corner.
http://www.columbusunderground.com/edwards-communities-contemplates-infill-at-gay-and-high
-Plans were also announced to renovate hundreds of apartments in the Metro West complex behind Westland Mall.
http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/blog/2014/04/mitt-romney-affiliate-buys-most-of-metro-west.html

May
-The Short North Donatos announced plans to rebuild into a new restaurant with 2nd floor patio and additional spaces for more retail.
http://www.columbusunderground.com/forums/topic/short-north-donatos-demolition-and-new-build
-The Byers Chevrolet site on West Broad Street in Franklinton was purchased by Nationwide Reality for a potential mixed-use project.
http://www.columbusunderground.com/nri-to-redevelop-byers-chevrolet-site-in-franklinton
-Casto announced plans for a 152-unit residential complex overlooking the Scioto River near Hayden Road.
http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/blog/2014/05/casto-to-build-apartments-overlooking-scioto-river.html
-41 new homes were coming to N. Grant Avenue in Weinland Park.
http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/blog/2014/05/wagenbrenner-adding-market-rate-homes-in-weinland.html
-A small condo development was proposed for Summit in Italian Village.
http://www.columbusunderground.com/condos-proposed-for-first-and-summit-in-italian-village-bw1
-Children’s Hospital announced plans for 2 new buildings on Livingston Avenue.
http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2014/05/28/Nationwide-Childrens-Hospital-plans-expansion.html
-The Stoddart Block, a historic residential building, would be renovated into micro apartments.
http://www.columbusunderground.com/forums/topic/stoddart-block-affordable-housing-downtown

Economic News
-Home sales declined in all 3 months of March-May, as demand far outpaced supply.
-The unemployment rate continued to fall to multi-year lows.
http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/business/2014/05/20/regional-central-ohio-unemployment-falls-april.html
-Columbus was named the 6th most affordable metro in the nation.
http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/blog/2014/05/ohio-cities-ranked-among-most-affordable-housing.html

Other News
-Columbus’ population was announced to have grown by more than 12,000 people between 2012-2013, and reached a population of 822,553 in 2013.
-Columbus was named one of the top cities for entrepreneurs.
http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/blog/2014/05/columbus-tops-in-ohio-among-best-cities-for.html
-Columbus was named a top city where people could accomplish their dreams/goals.
http://www.columbusunderground.com/columbus-ranked-6th-on-list-of-american-dream-cities-jb1