Housing Trends of Columbus

***Originally Posted May 23, 2014, updated with 2014 data 9/18/2015 and again on 5/29/2016 with 2015 data***

I posted a graph recently showing housing permits for Franklin County to show how construction was trending. Today, I found more long-term data for both the city and county that continue to show some interesting trends.

First, let’s look at just the city of Columbus.

The chart above goes back through the mid-1990s. The first thing to notice is the housing boom from 1999-2002. Both single-family and multi-family construction was booming. The very good economic conditions, or seemingly good ones, during the 1999-2000 period is probably most responsible for this. What’s most interesting is that the boom seemed to last through at least part of the mild recession experienced in 2001-2002. After that, housing of both types started to decline through the late 2000s. This shows that construction in the city began to decline as early as 2002-2003, before the peak of the general housing boom in the mid-2000s.

Another interesting fact is at the end of the period. Multi-family units have recovered and are back in boom territory. This boom, however, is much different than the one that occurred more than a decade ago, as shown by the below chart.

During the 1999-2002 housing boom, multi-family housing averaged 59.3% of all the units constructed. In the current boom, which began in 2012, multi-family housing has averaged 81.4% of all the units constructed. The average difference between the types 1999-2002 was just 18.6 points. In the current boom, the difference is almost 63 points! In that regard, there really is no comparison between the housing boom a decade ago and the current one. Multi-family construction is in MUCH higher relative demand now than it was at any time in the last 20 years, including during the last housing boom.

But what does this tell us about where the housing is actually being constructed? Well, for that, we have to look at the entirety of Franklin County. Is the county also seeing a similar multi-family boom, or has single-family construction recovered there more than in the city?

This chart, in some aspects, is the opposite of the one for the city. While in the city, multi-family units consistently outnumbered single-family, the opposite is true for the county as a whole. This is likely because the county takes into account all the suburban areas, most of which are dominated by single-family housing. In only a few instances did multi-family housing units outnumber single-family before 2010. After 2010, it’s clear that the multi-family boom is hitting the rest of the county and not just Columbus itself. This may actually represent an even greater shift in housing construction. While it appeared that single-family construction was gradually rising since 2011, it once again fell off some in 2015 while multi-family went up. It appears that the new reality is, at least for now, holding steady.

Here’s the % of total chart for the county.

So it’s also clear that the county is seeing most of its construction in recent years be multi-family units.

Before and After Google Special: 2007-Present Part 3

In the 3rd installment, we look at the Arena District/Far Northern Downtown area.

Location: N. High and W. Nationwide Blvd, looking northwest.
Date: July 2007

Same location in June 2014.

Location: W. Nationwide Blvd. and N. Front, looking northeast.
Date: July 2007

Same location in May 2014.

Location: W. Nationwide Blvd. and John H. McConnell Blvd., facing north-northwest.
Date: October 2007

Same location in June 2014.

Location: W. Nationwide Blvd. at Neil Avenue, facing north.
Date: October 2007

Same location in July 2014.

Location: W. Nationwide Blvd. at Neil Avenue, facing northwest.
Date: October 2007

Same location in July 2014.

Location: W. Nationwide Blvd. and Huntington Park Lane, facing north.
Date: October 2007

Same location in June 2014.

Location: W. Nationwide Blvd. and Hanover Street, facing south.
Date: October 2007

Same location in June 2014.

Location: W. Nationwide Blvd. and Hanover Street, facing west.
Date: October 2007

Same location in June 2014.

Location: Neil Avenue and Broadbelt Lane, facing west-northwest.
Date: August 2007

Same location in June 2014.

Location: Neil Avenue and Vine Street, facing southwest.
Date: August 2007

Same location in June 2014.

Location: Vine Street and Convention Center Drive, facing south.
Date: October 2007

Same location in June 2014.

Location: N. High and Vine Street, facing west-southwest.
Date: August 2007

Same location in June 2014.

Location: N. High Street at the Convention Center, facing north-northwest.
Date: August 2007

Same location in June 2014.

Before and After Google Special: 2007-Present Part 2

For the 2nd installment, let’s take a look at Downtown.

Location: W. Mound at S. High, facing southwest.
Date: July 2007

Same location in August 2015.

Location: W. Mound at S. High Street, facing northwest.
Date: July 2007

Same location in August 2015.

Location: W. Main at S. High, facing northeast.
Date: July 2007

Same location in August 2015.

Location: W. Main Street, facing west.
Date: July 2007

Same location in August 2015

Location: S. Front and W. Main, facing south.
Date: July 2007

Same location in August 2015.

Location: W. Main and S. Front, facing north.
Date: July 2007

Same location in August 2015.

Location: W. Town and S. Front, facing south.
Date: July 2007

Same location in August 2015.

Location: W. Town and S. High, facing northwest.
Date: March 2009

Same location in August 2015.

Location: W. Town and S. High, facing east.
Date: March 2009

Same location in August 2015.

Location: E. Rich between S. High and 3rd, facing north.
Date: April 2009

Same location in August 2015.

Location: E. Rich and S. 3rd, facing northwest.
Date: March 2009

Same location in August 2015.

Location: Civic Center Drive at the Riverfront, facing north.
Date: July 2007

Same location in August 2015.

Location: Broad and High, facing northeast.
Date: July 2007

Same location in August 2015.

Location: W. Gay and S. Front, facing northwest.
Date: July 2007

Same location in September 2015.

Location: E. Gay and S. 4th, facing east.
Date: August 2007

Same location in August 2015.

Location: E. Gay and N. 5th, facing north.
Date: August 2007

Same location in August 2015.

Location: E. Long and Normandy, facing southeast
Date: July 2007

Same location in August 2015

Location: Cleveland Avenue and E. Gay, looking northwest.
Date: August 2007

Same location in August 2015.

Location: E. Gay and N. Grant, facing south-southwest.
Date: August 2007

Same location in August 2014.

Columbus Poverty vs. Ohio

The following numbers are based off the American Community Survey. They are estimates, not physical counts like the population census, so there is a definite fudge factor involved with them as to their overall accuracy. 2011 is the latest year available for the ACS estimates.

2011 % of City Population Living in Poverty, Lowest to Highest
1. Columbus: 23.2%
2. Akron: 28.9%
3. Cincinnati: 29.5%
4. Toledo: 30.1%
5. Youngstown: 33.2%
6. Cleveland: 34.3%
7. Dayton: 35.7%

Change from 2010-2011
Cincinnati: -3.6%
Akron: -1.7%
Cleveland: +0.9%
Columbus: +2.7%
Dayton: +3.5%
Youngstown: +4.4%
Toledo: +16.7%
Change from 2007-2011
Youngstown: +1.8%
Columbus: +10.5%
Cleveland: +16.3%
Dayton: +18.2%
Akron: +22.5%
Cincinnati: +25.5%
Toledo: +33.2%

Change from 2000-2011
1. Cleveland: +30.4%
2. Youngstown: +33.9%
3. Cincinnati: +34.7%
4. Dayton: +55.2%
5. Columbus: +56.8%
6. Akron: +65.1%
7. Toledo: +68.2%

2011 % of Metro Population Living in Poverty, Lowest to Highest
1. Cincinnati: 14.3%
2. Columbus: 15.4%
3. Cleveland: 16.0%
4. Youngstown: 16.1%
5. Akron: 16.6%
6. Dayton: 17.6%
7. Toledo: 20.2%

Change from 2010-2011
1. Youngstown: -5.8%
2. Columbus: -1.9%
3. Cincinnati: +2.1%
4. Cleveland: +6.0%
5. Akron: +7.1%
6. Dayton: +8.0%
7. Toledo: +16.1%

Change from 2007-2011
1. Youngstown: +8.8%
2. Columbus: +14.9%
3. Akron: +23.9%
4. Cleveland: +26.0%
5. Cincinnati: +28.8%
6. Toledo: +36.5%
7. Dayton: +37.5%

Change from 2000-2011
1. Youngstown: +40.0%
2. Cleveland: +48.1%
3. Cincinnati: +50.5%
4. Columbus: +55.5%
5. Toledo: +66.9%
6. Akron: +69.4%
7. Dayton: +76.0%


December 5-6, 2007- Clipper and Cold

Forecasts on December 4th, 2007 called for a weak, fast-moving clipper to affect much of the Midwest, Great Lakes, Ohio Valley and east to the Mid-Atlantic coast. Most forecasts in Ohio had the area south of I-80 down to just north of the Ohio River getting 1-3″ of snowfall, with a potential max of 2-4″ in south-central Ohio from Dayton to Chillicothe.

Snowfall began in western Ohio at about 10pm and reached central Ohio by midnight on the 4th. It began as flurries and light snow showers but gradually increased in intensity overnight and into the morning of the 5th, becoming heavy at times. By the time that the snowfall ended around 2:30pm in the afternoon, 4-6″ covered most of central Ohio, with the heaviest accumulations right near the I-70 corridor. Another max of snow occurred along a Mansfield to Canton line where a general 4-6″ also occurred.

The night of the 5th-6th brought a cold night for most of Ohio as clear skies after the storm and snow-covered ground sent temperatures far below normal. Most areas saw temperatures in the single digits, and many even fell into the single digits below zero. For Columbus, the low of 9 was the second lowest temperature ever recorded for the 6th of December.