August 2018 Missed- and Gained- Opportunities of the Month



Instead of focusing on a single project this month, I wanted to do a rundown of a few projects- this time both good and bad.

First, the bad.

High and Cherry Street Project
In what’s becoming a tradition for Downtown, yet another project there has been inexplicably downsized. Originally approved back in 2016, the project required the demolition of a historic building.

Photo taken in 2015.

This was generally considered okay because the proposed 11-story project was a significant improvement in density that would’ve added more vibrancy to this part of Downtown.

The 11-story rendering in 2016.

Two years later and, beyond the demolition, there had been no movement on the site, which was itself a little concerning because that typically means that something’s gone wrong or there are about to be big changes for the project. So it was no surprise when, toward the end of July, we received the bad news. Not only was the project going to be reduced in size by a full 4 stories, but all aspects of the project were getting worse. Parking spaces doubled, bike parking spaces were reduced by 70% to just 18, the ground floor retail was completely eliminated and overall residential units fell by 50 to just 70 total. Worse still, even the design of the building became just another bland box.

So what happened? Crawford-Hoying, the developer, made some reference to rising material costs that made its plan to include affordable, micro-unit apartments too expensive, hence the reduction in project size. However, this excuse seems suspicious at best. If higher material costs were a detriment to building the affordable component, why not simply lower the number of micro units or change to a market-rate project altogether? Furthermore, what would that have to do with eliminating the retail space or increasing parking? It wouldn’t. In fact, building parking is actually very expensive, and it’s why many cities nationally are reducing or eliminating parking requirements for new projects, as it is often prohibitively expensive to build and can derail quality urban proposals. If finances were tight, the last thing a developer would do with a new project is add MORE parking rather than trying to maximize potential income with residential units or retail space. Meanwhile, in the month since the project reduction was announced, we have seen other new projects announced or previously-announced projects move forward that have seen no reduction. The company also didn’t make any changes to its 10-story Moxy Hotel project at 800 N. High street, which is currently under construction. Overall, this just feels like a bait and switch. The 11-story proposal was approved, which allowed for the demolition, and now it’s coming in smaller and of a lower quality.
Regardless of the real reasons why this project was suburbanized and reduced, it continues the long-standing pattern of Downtown projects being underwhelming. Downtown should be receiving the the statement makers, so to speak. Instead, we continue to see other neighborhoods get them.

Speaking of, let’s look at the good with a couple of proposals that have matched, if not exceeded, their potential.

Upper Arlington’s Arlington Gateway
Proposed back in 2016 as a 7-story mixed-use building, the project has gone through many revisions. Over the course of the last 2 years, the project has only grown in size to its final iteration, an 11-story with more than 200 apartments, office space and retail. The $100 million project is the largest ever proposed for Upper Arlington, which has long been a more traditional suburban-style inner suburb. It has resisted the urban densification movement until recently. Being landlocked, the only way that it can increase population and maintain tax levels is to build up. Its city leadership seems to understand this, and though there was neighborhood opposition to the project, the city approved it almost unanimously.

The project will replace suburban development, including a strip center and Pizza Hut, as seen below.

Quality urbanism, increased walkability… this is a solid addition to Upper Arlington.

Franklinton’s Gravity 2.0
Franklinton is seeing a revival these days, particularly east of 315. Multiple projects have been proposed, and the upcoming Scioto Peninsula redevelopment is on the horizon. Kaufman Development, highlighted in last month’s Missed Opportunity for having to abandon a project in Victorian Village due to NIMBYism, has been on somewhat of a roll lately. It spearheaded a significant renovation of the famed LeVeque Tower, it built both of Downtown’s largest recent projects- 250 High and 80 on the Commons (the latter of which was, of course, downsized)- and it’s heavily investing in the future of Franklinton with a stunning, out-of-the-box development named Gravity.

Gravity 1.0

The Gravity 1.0 site in 2014.

Gravity 1.0 was proposed back in 2016 as a 6-story, mixed-use development at 500 W. Broad Street
Replacing a few single-story, non-historic buildings and some parking lots (as seen above), the project was designed to drastically change the existing streetscape. It began construction in late 2016 and is nearing completion now. Few anticipated a second phase of the project, however, dubbed Gravity 2.0
The latest 12-story proposal for Gravity 2.0.

Another Broad Street component of Gravity 2.0.

Announced last week, Gravity 2.0 would be much more massive in scale than 1.0. Proposed for the entire block directly across the street between W. Broad and W. State, the project would include the following:
– A 12-story mixed-use building at the northeast corner of the site, directly to the west of the railroad tracks. This would contain 258 apartments.
– A 6-story residential building on the State Street with 94 units.
– A 5-story parking garage.
– A 6-story mixed-use addition to the existing Murphy building, which will be renovated.
– A 5-story townhouse building along McDowell Street with 18 units.
– A renovation to the existing Solazzo Building at the southwest corner.
Like Gravity 1.0, the project will include different types of amenities than would be typically found. These include a green roof on the parking garage with a “city view overlook”, as well as an art walk through the lower floor of the garage. Along Broad Street, a retail plaza will be constructed out of shipping containers. Co-living will be included in the southern residential building. A food hall, brewery and restaurants are also potentially in the works. Overall, the architecture will match the funky modernism of Gravity 1.0.

This project is poised to become a serious game-changer for Franklinton. While there was already ongoing redevelopment in this area, a mid-rise development like this pushes the envelope and raises the prospects of future development coming in bigger, and the pace of the redevelopment will likely accelerate. This also increases the likelihood that the Scioto Peninsula to the east will see larger scale development, as well. Originally, the city wanted a couple 30+ story buildings there, with a mix of other mid-rise buildings. That plan was abandoned when an Indianapolis developer was chosen for the site and proposed mostly low-rise. That developer was let go from the project a few months ago, and the Peninsula will now be developed piece by piece. With large development occurring in Franklinton itself, the high-rises may be about to make a return, making the entire eastern section of Franklinton an extension of Downtown.

So there are a few great projects that are definitely NOT missed opportunities. Take note, Downtown developers- a lot of you are getting embarrassed.



Columbus Area and Ohio City Population Estimates for 2017





So once again, city estimates came out today. As has been the case for a long time now, Columbus is rocketing upward at record pace. The 2016 comparison numbers have been adjusted by the Census for the 2017 update.

First, let’s take a look at the top 25 largest cities in Ohio on July 1, 2017.
Census 2010—————————-July 1, 2016——————-July 1, 2017
1. Columbus: 787,033——–1. Columbus: 863,741———–1. Columbus: 879,170
2. Cleveland: 396,815———2. Cleveland: 387,451———-2. Cleveland: 385,525
3. Cincinnati: 296,943———3. Cincinnati: 299,127———-3. Cincinnati: 301,301
4. Toledo: 287,208————-4. Toledo: 278,06—————4. Toledo: 276,491
5. Akron: 199,110————–5. Akron: 197,711—————5. Akron: 197,846
6. Dayton: 141,527————6. Dayton: 140,743————–6. Dayton: 140,371
7. Parma: 81,601————–7. Parma: 79,591—————–7. Parma: 79,167
8. Canton: 73,007————-8. Canton: 71,294—————-8. Canton: 70,909
9. Youngstown: 66,982——9. Youngstown: 64,360———9. Youngstown: 64,604
10. Lorain: 64,097————10. Lorain: 63,700—————-10. Lorain: 63,841
11. Hamilton: 62,477———11. Hamilton: 62,157————11. Hamilton: 62,092
12. Springfield: 60,608——-12. Springfield: 58,902———12. Springfield: 59,208
13. Kettering: 56,163———13. Kettering: 55,218————13. Kettering: 55,175
14. Elyria: 54,533————-14. Elyria: 53,880—————–14. Elyria: 53,883
15. Lakewood: 52,131——-15. Lakewood: 50,500———-15. Lakewood: 50,249
16. Cuyahoga Falls: 49,652–16. Cuyahoga Falls: 49,197–16. Newark: 49,423
17. Euclid: 48,920————-17. Newark: 48,899———-17. Cuyahoga Falls: 49,247
18. Middletown: 48,694——18. Middletown: 48,819——–18. Middletown: 48,823
19. Mansfield: 47,821——–19. Euclid: 47,464—————19. Dublin: 47,619
20. Newark: 47,573———–20. Mentor: 46,823————-20. Euclid: 47,201
21. Mentor: 47,159————21. Mansfield: 46,671———-21. Mentor: 47,121
22. Cleveland Heights: 46,121–22. Beavercreek: 46,393–22. Beavercreek: 46,948
23. Beavercreek: 45,193—–23. Dublin: 45,673————-23. Mansfield: 46,160
24. Strongsville: 44.750—–24. Cleveland Heights: 44,805–24. Strongsville: 44,744
25. Fairfield: 42,510———25. Strongsville: 44,713———25. Cleveland Heights: 44,562

So Columbus easily maintained #1, and Dublin and Newark are rapidly climbing the list.

Here are all of the Columbus Metro’s cities, towns and villages on July 1, 2017, and the total change from July 1, 2016.
1. Columbus: 879,170 +15,429
2. Newark: 49,423 +534
3. Dublin: 47,619 +1,937
4. Grove City: 41,022 +1,128
5. Lancaster: 40,280 +431
6. Westerville: 39,737 +671
7. Delaware: 39,267 +506
8. Reynoldsburg: 37,847 +345
9. Hilliard: 35,939 +938
10. Upper Arlington: 35,337 +217
11. Gahanna: 35,297 +241
12. Marysville: 23,912 +462
13. Pickerington: 20,402 +350
14. Whitehall: 18,913 +89
15. Pataskala: 15,566 +147
16. Worthington: 14,646 +71
17. Circleville: 13,930 +80
18. Bexley: 13,786 +48
19. Powell: 13,204 +400
20. New Albany: 10,718 +301
21. Heath: 10,713 +100
22. London: 10,138 +143
23. Canal Winchester: 8,294 +349
24. Grandview Heights: 7,778 +116
25. Logan: 7,069 +25
26. Granville: 5,773 +11
27. Groveport: 5,621 +26
28. Sunbury: 5,293 +57
29. Johnstown: 5,002 +43
30. Obetz: 4,967 +99
31. New Lexington: 4,704 -12
32. Plain City: 4,379 +32
33. West Jefferson: 4,355 +59
34. Ashville: 4,147 +29
35. Mount Gilead: 3,655 +1
36. Baltimore: 2,989 +15
37. Buckeye Lake: 2,816 +18
38. Crooksville: 2,491 -6
39. Hebron: 2,435 +23
40. Richwood: 2,372 +56
41. Utica: 2,211 +17
42. Cardington: 2,048 +2
43. South Bloomfield: 1,972 +19
44. Roseville: 1,839 -4
45. Mount Sterling: 1,767 +10
46. Commercial Point: 1,629 +13
47. Lithopolis: 1,573 +128
48. Ashley: 1,537 +26
49. Somerset: 1,462 -1
50. Bremen: 1,441 +6
51. Minerva Park: 1,321 +6
52. Hanover: 1,178 +15
53. Williamsport: 1,065 +6
54. Millersport: 1,055 +7
55. Urbancrest: 1,001 +6
56. Thornville: 999 +5
57. Pleasantville: 964 +3
58. Milford Center: 860 +20
59. New Holland: 840 +5
60. Junction City: 808 -2
61. Shawnee Hills: 787 +14
62. Amanda: 747 +4
63. Ostrander: 713 +13
64. New Straitsville: 711 -1
65. Marble Cliff: 683 +10
66. Galena: 682 +1
67. Shawnee: 643 -1
68. Valleyview: 638 +1
69. Thurston: 609 +4
70. Corning: 571 -1
71. Butchel: 568 +5
72. Stoutsville: 567 +3
73. Riverlea: 566 +2
74. Carroll: 560 +33
75. Kirkersville: 542 +3
76. Alexandria: 534 +3
77. Laurelville: 511 +2
78. Murray City: 441 +1
79. Edison: 438 +0
80. Sugar Grove: 426 +0
81. Hartford: 404 +2
82. St. Louisville: 380 +4
83. South Solon: 357 -1
84. Marengo: 338 -1
85. Harrisburg: 335 +4
86. Midway: 326 +1
87. Rushville: 310 +2
88. Magnetic Springs: 285 +8
89. Tarlton: 282 +1
90. Orient: 278 +1
91. Fulton: 258 +0
92. Lockbourne: 246 +0
93. Darbyville: 234 +1
94. Unionville Center: 232 -1
95. Chesterville: 227 +0
96. Gratiot: 222 +1
97. Glenford: 172 +0
98. Sparta: 158 -3
99. Hemlock: 152 +0
100. West Rushville: 135 +1
101. Brice: 119 +1
102. Rendville: 36 +0

Some milestones include Grove City and Lancaster passing 40,000 for the first time and Johnstown passing the 5,000 mark. 11 places lost population, 8 stayed the same and 83 gained population. The growing portions of the Columbus metro continue to encompass the vast majority of incorporated places.

Nationally, here were the top 20 fastest-growing cities by numerical change between July 1, 2016 and July 1, 2017
1. San Antonio, Texas: +24,208
2. Phoenix, Arizona: 24,036
3. Dallas, Texas: +18,935
4. Fort Worth, Texas: +18,664
5. Los Angeles: 18,643
6. Seattle, Washington: +17,490
7. Charlotte, North Carolina: +15,551
8. Columbus: +15,429
9. Frisco, Texas: +13,470
10. Atlanta, Georgia: +13,323
11. San Diego, California: +12,834
12. Austin, Texas: +12,515
13. Jacksonville, Florida: +11,169
14. Irvine, California: +11,068
15. Henderson, Nevada: +10,534
16. Las Vegas, Nevada: 9,966
17. Denver, Colorado: 9,844
18. Washington, DC: 9,636
19. Tampa, Florida: 9,383
20. Mesa, Arizona: 9,025

Columbus may in fact be an official boomtown now.



2017 County/Metro Population Estimates Part 2





In part 2, I am going to examine metro areas, not only in Ohio, but also Columbus’ peer group that includes Midwest and national metro areas. Midwest peers (outside Ohio) used would be any metro with a population greater than 500,000. National peers would be metros that either started or ended the period 2010-2017 with a population between 1.5-2.5 Million.

As with counties, I am going to start this look with a comparison of overall population.

Total Metro Area Population Census 2010, July 1, 2016 and July 1, 2017
Census 2010——————————-July 1, 2016————————July 1, 2017

1. Chicago, IL: 9,461,104————-1. Chicago: 9,546,326———–1. Chicago: 9,533,040
2. Detroit, MI: 4,296,250—————2. Detroit: 4,305,869————-2. Detroit: 9,313,002
3. Minneapolis, MN: 3,348,8459—3. Minneapolis: 3,557,276–3. Minneapolis: 3,600,618
4. St. Louis, MO: 2,787,701———4. St. Louis: 2,806,782———4. St. Louis: 2,807,338
5. Pittsburgh, PA: 2,356,285——–5. Charlotte: 2,475,519———5. Charlotte: 2,525,305
6. Portland, OR: 2,226,009———-6. Orlando: 2,453,333———-6. Orlando: 2,509,831
7. Charlotte: 2,217,012———–7. San Antonio: 2,426,211—–7. San Antonio: 2,473,974
8. Sacramento, CA: 2,149,127—–8. Portland: 2,423,102——–8. Portland: 2,453,168
9. San Antonio, TX: 2,142,516—–9. Pittsburgh: 2,341,536——9. Pittsburgh: 2,333,367
10. Orlando, FL: 2,134,411—–10. Sacramento: 2,295,233—10. Sacramento: 2,324,884
11. Cincinnati: 2,114,580———-11. Cincinnati: 2,166,029—–11. Las Vegas: 2,204,079
12. Cleveland: 2,077,240————12. Las Vegas: 2,156,724—-12. Cincinnati: 2,179,082
13. Kansas City, MO: 2,009,342-13. Kansas City: 2,106,382-13. Kansas City: 2,128,912
14. Las Vegas, NV: 1,951,269——–14. Austin: 2,060,558——–14. Austin: 2,115,827
15. Columbus: 1,901,974———-15. Cleveland: 2,060,065——15. Columbus: 2,078,725
16. Indianapolis, IN: 1,887,877——16. Columbus: 2,046,977—16. Cleveland: 2,058,844
17. San Jose, CA: 1,836,911—17. Indianapolis: 2,005,612—17. Indianapolis: 2,028,614
18. Austin, TX: 1,716,289————18. San Jose: 1,990,910—-18. San Jose: 1,998,463
19. Virginia Beach, VA: 1,676,822—19. Nashville: 1,868,855—-19. Nashville: 1,903,045
20. Nashville: 1,670,890—20. Virginia Beach: 1,722,766–20. Virginia Beach: 1,725,246
21. Providence, RI: 1,600,852—-21. Providence: 1,615,878—21. Providence: 1,621,122
22. Milwaukee, WI: 1,555,908—–22. Milwaukee: 1,576,143—22. Milwaukee: 1,576,236
23. Jacksonville, FL: 1,345,596-23. Jacksonville: 1,476,503–23. Jacksonville: 1,504,980
24. Grand Rapids: 988,938–24. Grand Rapids: 1,048,826-24. Grand Rapids: 1,059,113
25. Omaha, NE: 865,350————–25. Omaha: 924,003—-25. Omaha: 933,316
26. Dayton: 799,232——————–26. Dayton: 800,886—–26. Dayton: 803,416
27. Akron: 703,200———————27. Akron: 702,556——–27. Akron: 703,505
28. Wichita, KS: 630,919————-28. Madison: 647,432—28. Madison: 654,230
29. Toledo: 610,001——————29. Wichita: 644,680——29. Des Moines: 645,911
30. Madison, WI: 605,435———–30. Des Moines: 634,740—-30. Wichita: 645,628
31. Des Moines, IA: 569,633——-31. Toledo: 604,591——31. Toledo: 603,668
32. Youngstown: 565,773——32. Youngstown: 544,543—32. Youngstown: 541,926
33. Canton: 404,422——————33. Canton: 401,165—-33. Canton: 399,927

Columbus passed up Cleveland to become Ohio’s 2nd largest metro.

Metro Area Total Growth Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017—————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Austin, TX: +399,507———————————–1. Orlando: +56,498
2. Orlando, FL: +375,432———————————2. Austin: +55,269
3. San Antonio, TX: +331,458—————————3. Charlotte: +49,786
4. Charlotte, NC: +308,313——————————-4. San Antonio: +47,763
5. Las Vegas, NV: +252,810—————————–5. Las Vegas: +47,355
6. Minneapolis, MN: +251,760————————–6. Minneapolis: +43,342
7. Nashville, TN: +232,162——————————-7. Nashville: +34,190
8. Portland, OR: +227,167——————————-8. Columbus: +31,748
9. Columbus: +176,724———————————–9. Portland: +30,066
10. Sacramento, CA: +175,740————————10. Sacramento: +29,651
11. San Jose, CA: +161,523—————————-11. Jacksonville: +28,477
12. Jacksonville, FL: +159,382————————-12. Indianapolis: +23,002
13. Indianapolis, IN: +140,524————————-13. Kansas City: +22,530
14. Kansas City, MO: +119,574————————14. Cincinnati: +13,053
15. Des Moines, IA: +76,278—————————15. Des Moines: +11,171
16. Chicago, IL: +71,499——————————–16. Grand Rapids: +10,287
17. Grand Rapids, MI: +70,173————————17. Omaha: +9,313
18. Omaha, NE: +67,960——————————–18. San Jose: +7,533
19. Cincinnati: +64,396———————————–19. Detroit: +7,133
20. Madison, WI: +48,802——————————-20. Madison: +6,798
21. Virginia Beach, VA: +48,429———————-21. Providence: +5,244
22. Milwaukee, WI: +20,282—————————22. Dayton: +2,530
23. Providence, RI: +19,912————————–23. Virginia Beach: +2,480
24. St. Louis, MO: +19,575—————————24. Akron: +949
25. Detroit, MI: +16,685——————————-25. Wichita: +948
26. Wichita, KS: +14,704——————————26. St. Louis: +556
27. Dayton: +4,165————————————-27. Milwaukee: +93
28. Akron: +302—————————————–28. Toledo: -923
29. Canton: -4,501————————————-29. Cleveland: -1,221
30. Toledo: -6,334————————————-30. Canton: -1,238
31. Cleveland: -18,427——————————-31. Youngstown: -2,617
32. Pittsburgh, PA: -22,924————————-32. Pittsburgh: -8,169
33. Youngstown: -23,873—————————-33. Chicago: -13,286

Now, as done with counties, let’s look at the components of population change for metro areas.

Total Births By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Chicago: +869,178—————————————-1. Chicago: +115,915
2. Detroit: +364,121———————————————-2. Detroit: +49,940
3. Minneapolis: +331,430————————————–3. Minneapolis: +45,810
4. St. Louis: +246,280——————————————4. San Antonio: +34,318
5. San Antonio: +236,348————————————–5. St. Louis: +33,143
6. Charlotte: +217,525——————————————6. Charlotte: +31,315
7. Portland: +201,872——————————————-7. Orlando: +29,173
8. Orlando: +200,843——————————————-8. Portland: +28,220
9. Kansas City: +200,535————————————–9. Columbus: +27,663
10. Sacramento: +198,466————————————10. Kansas City: +27,565
11. Columbus: +197,185—————————————11. Las Vegas: +27,449
12. Cincinnati: +196,146—————————————12. Austin: +27,400
13. Las Vegas: +194,083————————————–13. Sacramento: +27,148
14. Indianapolis: +193,599————————————14. Cincinnati: +26,855
15. Austin: +188,961——————————————–15. Indianapolis: +26,769
16. San Jose: +176,224—————————————-16. Nashville: +24,690
17. Pittsburgh: +173,472—————————————17. San Jose: +23,826
18. Nashville: +170,824—————————————–18. Pittsburgh: +23,614
19. Cleveland: +168,361—————————————19. Cleveland: +22,873
20. Virginia Beach: +163,787———————————20. Milwaukee: +19,474
21. Milwaukee: +144,429————————————–21. Jacksonville: +18,748
22. Jacksonville: +130,339————————————22. Providence: +16,542
23. Providence: +120,526————————————-23. Grand Rapids: +13,548
24. Grand Rapids: +98,214———————————–24. Omaha: +13,421
25. Omaha: +96,558——————————————-25. Dayton: +9,615
26. Dayton: +69,855——————————————-26. Des Moines: +9,172
27. Wichita: +65,873——————————————27. Wichita: +8,694
28. Des Moines: +63,958————————————28. Madison: +7,400
29. Akron: +54,644——————————————–29. Toledo: +7,345
30. Toledo: +54,309——————————————-30. Akron: +7,342
31. Madison: +53,718—————————————-31. Virginia Beach: +5,935
32. Youngstown: +40,696———————————–32. Youngstown: +5,551
33. Canton: +32,199——————————————33. Canton: +4,434

Total Deaths By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Chicago: -501,469—————————————1. Chicago: -72,491
2. Detroit: -293,091—————————————–2. Detroit: -41,075
3. Pittsburgh: -197,572————————————3. Pittsburgh: -27,439
4. St. Louis: -186,111————————————–4. St. Louis: -26,755
5. Minneapolis: -161,913———————————5. Minneapolis: -23,527
6. Cleveland: -153,138———————————–6. Cleveland: -21,068
7. Cincinnati: -135,975———————————–7. Cincinnati: -19,515
8. Charlotte: -127,523————————————-8. Charlotte: -19,009
9. Portland: -120,590————————————–9. Orlando: -18,268
10. Sacramento: -120,429——————————10. Sacramento: -18,081
11. Kansas City: -119,748——————————11. Portland: -17,875
12. Orlando: -117,771———————————–12. San Antonio: -17,679
13. San Antonio: -117,289——————————13. Kansas City: -17,106
14. Indianapolis: -113,742——————————14. Las Vegas: -16,867
15. Columbus: -108,704——————————–15. Indianapolis: -16,081
16. Las Vegas: -108,003——————————–16. Columbus: -15,833
17. Providence: -107,920——————————-17. Providence: -15,031
18. Nashville: -99,415———————————–18. Nashville: -14,723
19. Virginia Beach: -97,935—————————-19. Milwaukee: -13,399
20. Milwaukee: -95,601———————————20. Jacksonville: -13,288
21. Jacksonville: -86,920——————————-21. San Jose: -11,360
22. San Jose: -73,507———————————–22. Austin: -10,609
23. Austin: -67,704—————————————23. Dayton: -8,359
24. Dayton: -59,736————————————-24. Grand Rapids: -7,674
25. Grand Rapids: -53,725—————————-25. Akron: -7,138
26. Akron: -50,948—————————————26. Youngstown: -6,821
27. Youngstown: -50,302——————————27. Omaha: -6,667
28. Omaha: -47,763————————————-28. Toledo: -5,968
29. Toledo: -42,313————————————-29. Wichita: -5,686
30. Wichita: -40,647————————————30. Des Moines: -4,631
31. Canton: -31,722————————————31. Canton: -4,366
32. Des Moines: -31,563——————————32. Madison: -4,252
33. Madison: -30,385———————————-33. Virginia Beach: -3,280

Total Net Natural Change (Births vs. Deaths) By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Chicago: +367,709—————————————1. Chicago: +43,424
2. Minneapolis: +169,517———————————–2. Minneapolis: +22,283
3. Austin: +121,257——————————————3. Austin: +16,791
4. San Antonio: +119,059———————————-4. San Antonio: +16,639
5. San Jose: +102,717————————————–5. San Jose: +12,466
6. Charlotte: +90,002—————————————-6. Charlotte: +12,306
7. Columbus: +88,481————————————–7. Columbus: +11,830
8. Las Vegas: +86,080————————————-8. Orlando: +10,905
9. Orlando: +83,072—————————————-9. Indianapolis: +10,688
10. Portland: +81,282————————————-10. Las Vegas: +10,582
11. Kansas City: +80,787———————————11. Kansas City: +10,459
12. Indianapolis: +79,857——————————–12. Portland: +10,345
13. Sacramento: +78,037——————————–13. Nashville: +9,967
14. Nashville: +71,409————————————14. Sacramento: +9,067
15. Detroit: +71,030—————————————15. Detroit: +8,865
16. Virginia Beach: +65,852—————————–16. Virginia Beach: +7,762
17. Cincinnati: +60,171———————————–17. Cincinnati: +7,340
18. St. Louis: +60,169————————————-18. Omaha: +6,754
19. Milwaukee: +48,828———————————-19. St. Louis: +6,388
20. Omaha: +48,795————————————–20. Grand Rapids: +5,874
21. Grand Rapids: +44,489—————————–21. Jacksonville: +5,460
22. Jacksonville: +43,419——————————-22. Des Moines: +4,541
23. Des Moines: +32,395——————————-23. Madison: +3,148
24. Wichita: +25,226————————————-24. Milwaukee: +6,075
25. Madison: +23,333———————————–25. Wichita: +3,008
26. Cleveland: +15,223——————————–26. Cleveland: +1,805
27. Providence: +12,606——————————27. Providence: +1,511
28. Toledo: +11,996———————————–28. Toledo: +1,377
29. Dayton: +10,119———————————-29. Dayton: +1,256
30. Akron: +3,696————————————–30. Akron: +204
31. Canton: +477—————————————31. Canton: +68
32. Youngstown: -9,606——————————-32. Youngstown: -1,270
33. Pittsburgh: -24,100——————————–33. Pittsburgh: -3,825

Total Domestic Migration By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Austin: +224,351—————————————–1. Charlotte: +31,102
2. Charlotte: +177,484————————————-2. Austin: +30,120
3. San Antonio: +169,684——————————–3. Las Vegas: +29,414
4. Orlando: +155,498————————————–4. San Antonio: +24,891
5. Nashville: +126,142————————————-5. Orlando: +23,321
6. Las Vegas: +119,742———————————-6. Jacksonville: +18,921
7. Portland: +106,839————————————-7. Nashville: +18,708
8. Jacksonville: +87,040———————————8. Portland: +13,384
9. Sacramento: +49,262———————————9. Sacramento: +12,888
10. Columbus: +42,932———————————10. Columbus: +12,562
11. Des Moines: +32,042——————————-11. Kansas City: +8,531
12. Indianapolis: +30,772——————————-12. Minneapolis: +8,095
13. Kansas City: +16,802——————————-13. Indianapolis: +7,763
14. Madison: +13,224————————————14. Des Moines: +4,812
15. Grand Rapids: +12,355—————————-15. Grand Rapids: +2,217
16. Omaha: +5,265—————————————16. Madison: +1,706
17. Minneapolis: +432———————————–17. Cincinnati: +1,541
18. Canton: -5,797—————————————-18. Omaha: +383
19. Akron: -13,427—————————————-19. Dayton: -346
20. Youngstown: -16,228——————————-20. Akron: -877
21. Dayton: -16,864————————————–21. Canton: -1,469
22. Wichita: -18,452————————————–22. Youngstown: -1,711
23. Cincinnati: -21,259———————————-23. Providence: -2,588
24. Toledo: -23,102————————————–24. Toledo: -3,070
25. Pittsburgh: -24,397———————————25. Wichita: -3,235
26. Providence: -33,335——————————-26. Virginia Beach: -4,706
27. Milwaukee: -50,575——————————–27. Cleveland: -8,008
28. Virginia Beach: -51,916—————————28. Pittsburgh: -8,633
29. Cleveland: -64,353——————————–29. Milwaukee: -9,635
30. St. Louis: -67,560———————————30. St. Louis: -8,828
31. San Jose: -73,026——————————–31. Detroit: -14,863
32. Detroit: -141,006———————————-32. San Jose: -25,729
33. Chicago: -479,482——————————–33. Chicago: -85,177

Total International Migration By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Chicago: +183,162—————————————1. Chicago: +28,302
2. Orlando: +135,860—————————————2. Orlando: +22,207
3. San Jose: +132,938————————————-3. San Jose: +20,747
4. Detroit: +86,366——————————————4. Detroit: +13,214
5. Minneapolis: +83,552———————————-5. Minneapolis: +13,107
6. Sacramento: +49,560———————————-6. Austin: +8,185
7. Austin: +49,311——————————————7. Sacramento: +7,722
8. Las Vegas: +46,411————————————8. Columbus: +7,350
9. Columbus: +45,744————————————9. Las Vegas: +7,221
10. Providence: +41,325——————————–10. Providence: +6,381
11. San Antonio: +40,953——————————-11. Portland: +6,335
12. Charlotte: +39,380———————————–12. Charlotte: +6,279
13. Portland: +38,542————————————13. San Antonio: +6,173
14. Virginia Beach: +34,619—————————-14. Nashville: +5,510
15. Nashville: +33,169———————————–15. Cleveland: +5,045
16. Cleveland: +31,236———————————-16. Indianapolis: +4,603
17. Indianapolis: +30,329——————————-17. Pittsburgh: +4,359
18. Jacksonville: +28,593——————————-18. Cincinnati: +4,285
19. St. Louis: +27,666————————————19. Jacksonville: +4,043
20. Pittsburgh: +27,300———————————20. St. Louis: +4,032
21. Cincinnati: +26,502———————————21. Milwaukee: +3,689
22. Kansas City: +23,098——————————22. Kansas City: +3,572
23. Milwaukee: +22,616——————————–23. Grand Rapids: +2,233
24. Omaha: +14,383————————————24. Omaha: +2,213
25. Grand Rapids: +13,800—————————25. Madison: +1,949
26. Madison: +12,367———————————-26. Des Moines: +1,807
27. Des Moines: +11,592—————————–27. Dayton: +1,654
28. Dayton: +11,230———————————–28. Akron: +1,647
29. Akron: +10,413————————————-29. Wichita: +1,187
30. Wichita: +8,117————————————-30. Virginia Beach: +1,077
31. Toledo: +4,627————————————-31. Toledo: +769
32. Youngstown: +2,171——————————32. Youngstown: +381
33. Canton: +1,118————————————33. Canton: +174

Total Net Migration By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Orlando: +291,358————————————–1. Orlando: +45,528
2. Austin: +273,662—————————————-2. Austin: +38,305
3. Charlotte: +216,864————————————3. Charlotte: +37,381
4. San Antonio: +210,637——————————–4. Las Vegas: +36,635
5. Las Vegas: +166,153———————————-5. San Antonio: +31,064
6. Nashville: +159,311————————————6. Nashville: +24,218
7. Portland: +145,381————————————7. Jacksonville: +22,964
8. Jacksonville: +115,633——————————-8. Minneapolis: +21,202
9. Sacramento: +98,822——————————–9. Sacramento: +20,610
10. Columbus: +88,676——————————–10. Columbus: +19,912
11. Minneapolis: +83,984——————————11. Portland: +19,719
12. Indianapolis: +61,101——————————12. Indianapolis: +12,366
13. San Jose: +59,912———————————-13. Kansas City: +12,103
14. Des Moines: +43,634——————————14. Des Moines: +6,619
15. Kansas City: +39,900——————————15. Cincinnati: +5,826
16. Grand Rapids: +26,155—————————16. Grand Rapids: +4,450
17. Madison: +25,591———————————-17. Providence: +3,793
18. Omaha: +19,648————————————18. Madison: +3,655
19. Providence: +7,990———————————19. Omaha: +2,596
20. Cincinnati: +5,243———————————-20. Dayton: +1,308
21. Pittsburgh: +2,903———————————-21. Akron: +770
22. Akron: -3,014—————————————-22. Canton: -1,295
23. Canton: -4,679————————————–23. Youngstown: -1,330
24. Dayton: -5,634————————————–24. Detroit: -1,649
25. Wichita: -10,335————————————25. Wichita: -2,048
26. Youngstown: -14,057—————————–26. Toledo: -2,301
27. Virginia Beach: -17,297————————–27. Cleveland: -2,963
28. Toledo: -18,475————————————28. Virginia Beach: -3,629
29. Milwaukee: -27,959——————————29. Pittsburgh: -4,274
30. Cleveland: -33,117——————————-30. San Jose: -4,982
31. St. Louis: -39,894———————————31. St. Louis: -5,796
32. Detroit: -54,640————————————32. Milwaukee: -5,946
33. Chicago: -296,320——————————-33. Chicago: -56,875



2017 Ohio County/Metro Population Estimates Part 1





Early this morning, the Census released the most recent population figures for counties, Metropolitan Statistical Areas and Consolidated Statistical Areas. The estimates cover the year from July 1, 2016 to July 1, 2017. For Part 1, we are going to take a look at counties.

Here are Ohio’s 88 counties and their population Census 2010, July 1, 2016 and July 1, 2017.

Census 2010——————————July 1, 2016————————-July 1, 2017
1. Cuyahoga: 1,280,122———–1. Franklin: 1,269,998———–1. Franklin: 1,291,981
2. Franklin: 1,163,414————2. Cuyahoga: 1,253,454——–2. Cuyahoga: 1,248,514
3. Hamilton: 802,374 ————–3. Hamilton: 810,087————-3. Hamilton: 813,822
4. Summit: 541,781—————-4. Summit: 540,394—————4. Summit: 541,228
5. Montgomery: 535,153——5. Montgomery: 531,395——–5. Montgomery: 530,604
6. Lucas: 441,815——————6. Lucas: 432,562—————–6. Lucas 430,887
7. Stark: 375,586——————-7. Butler: 377,933——————7. Butler: 380,604
8. Butler: 368,130——————8. Stark: 373,528——————8. Stark: 372,542
9. Lorain: 301,356—————–9. Lorain: 306,590——————9. Lorain: 307,924
10. Mahoning: 238,823———10. Mahoning: 230,169————10. Lake: 230,117
11. Lake: 230,041—————–11. Lake: 229,270——————11. Mahoning: 229,796
12. Warren: 212,693————-12. Warren: 226,476—————12. Warren: 228,882
13. Trumbull: 210,312———–13. Clermont: 203,016————13. Clermont: 204,214
14. Clermont: 197,363———–14. Trumbull: 201,701————-14. Delaware: 200,464
15. Delaware: 174,214———–15. Delaware: 196,777————15. Trumbull: 200,380
16. Medina: 172,332————-16. Medina: 176,903—————16. Medina: 178,371
17. Licking: 166,492————–17. Licking: 171,822—————17. Licking: 173,448
18. Greene: 161,573————–18. Greene: 165,109—————-18. Greene: 166,752
19. Portage: 161,419————-19. Portage: 162,162—————19. Portage: 162,277
20. Fairfield: 146,156————20. Fairfield: 152,681—————-20. Fairfield: 154,733
21. Clark: 138,333—————–21. Clark: 134,621——————–21. Clark: 134,557
22. Wood: 125,488—————22. Wood: 129,704——————-22. Wood: 130,492
23. Richland: 124,475————23. Richland: 121,167—————-23. Richland: 120,589
24. Wayne: 114,520————–24. Wayne: 116,422——————24. Wayne: 116,038
25. Columbiana: 107,841——-25. Miami: 104,382——————–25. Miami: 105,122
26. Allen: 106,331—————-26. Columbiana: 103,744————26. Allen: 103,198
27. Miami: 102,506————–27. Allen: 103,626——————27. Columbiana: 103,077
28. Ashtabula: 101,497———28. Ashtabula: 98,169————–28. Ashtabula: 97,807
29. Geauga: 93,389————-29. Geauga: 93,848—————–29. Geauga: 93,918
30. Tuscarawas: 92,582——–30. Tuscarawas: 92,485————30. Tuscarawas: 92,297
31. Muskingum: 86,074———31. Muskingum: 85,929————-31. Muskingum: 86,149
32. Scioto: 79,499—————-32. Ross: 76,910———————32. Ross: 77,313
33. Ross: 78,064—————–33. Scioto: 76,240——————–33. Scioto: 75,929
34. Erie: 77,079——————34. Hancock: 75,590—————–34. Hancock: 75,754
35. Hancock: 74,782————35. Erie: 74,944———————–35. Erie: 74,817
36. Belmont: 70,400————-36. Belmont: 68,568—————–36. Belmont: 68,029
37. Jefferson: 69,709————37. Jefferson: 66,914—————37. Athens: 66,597
38. Marion: 66,501—————38. Athens: 66,320——————38. Jefferson: 66,359
39. Athens: 64,757—————39. Marion: 65,334——————39. Marion: 64,967
40. Lawrence: 62,450———–40. Knox: 60,832———————40. Knox: 61,261
41. Washington: 61,778———41. Lawrence: 60,729————–41. Washington: 60,418
42. Sandusky: 60,944————42. Washington: 60,535———–42. Lawrence: 60,249
43. Knox: 60,921——————43. Sandusky: 59,281————–43. Sandusky: 59,195
44. Huron: 59,626—————–44. Huron: 58,391——————-44. Huron: 58,494
45. Seneca: 56,745—————45. Pickaway: 57,530—————45. Pickaway: 57,830
46. Pickaway: 55,698————-46. Union: 55,456——————-46. Union: 56,741
47. Ashland: 53,139—————47. Seneca: 55,357—————–47. Seneca: 55,243
48. Darke: 53,139—————–48. Ashland: 53,417—————–48. Ashland: 53,628
49. Union: 52,300——————49. Darke: 51,636——————-49. Darke: 51,536
50. Shelby: 49,423—————–50. Shelby: 48,726—————–50. Shelby: 48,759
51. Auglaize: 45,949————–51. Auglaize: 45,797—————-51. Auglaize: 45,778
52. Logan: 45,858—————–52. Logan: 45,171——————-52. Logan: 45,325
53. Brown: 44,846—————–53. Holmes: 43,832—————–53. Madison: 44,036
54. Crawford: 43,784————-54. Brown: 43,644——————-54. Holmes: 43,957
55. Highland: 43,589————-55. Madison: 43,354—————–55. Brown: 43,576
56. Madison: 43,435————-56. Highland: 42,993—————–56. Highland: 42,971
57. Fulton: 42,698—————-57. Fulton: 42,325——————–57. Fulton: 42,289
58. Holmes: 42,366————–58. Crawford: 42,037—————–58. Clinton: 42,009
59. Preble: 42,270—————-59. Clinton: 41,881——————-59. Crawford: 41,746
60. Clinton: 42,040—————60. Preble: 41,105——————–60. Preble: 41,120
61. Ottawa: 41,428—————61. Mercer: 40,710——————-61. Mercer: 40,873
62. Mercer: 40,814—————62. Ottawa: 40,495——————-62. Ottawa: 40,657
63. Champaign: 40,097———63. Guernsey: 39,200—————63. Guernsey: 39,093
64. Guernsey: 40,087———–64. Champaign: 38,737————-64. Champaign: 38,840
65. Defiance: 39,037————65. Defiance: 38,121—————–65. Defiance: 38,156
66. Williams: 37,642————66. Williams: 36,921——————66. Williams: 36,784
67. Coshocton: 36,901———-67. Coshocton: 36,644————-67. Coshocton: 36,544
68. Perry: 36,058—————–68. Perry: 36,019——————–68. Perry: 36,024
69. Morrow: 34,827————–69. Morrow: 34,827——————69. Morrow: 34,994
70. Putnam: 34,499————–70. Putnam: 34,016—————–70. Putnam: 33,878
71. Jackson: 33,225————-71. Jackson: 32,534—————–71. Jackson: 32,449
72. Hardin: 32,058—————72. Hardin: 31,407——————-72. Hardin: 31,364
73. Gallia: 30,934—————-73. Gallia: 29,996———————73. Gallia: 29,973
74. Hocking: 29,380————-74. Fayette: 28,662——————74. Fayette: 28,752
75. Fayette: 29,030————–75. Hocking: 28,386—————–75. Hocking: 28,474
76. Carroll: 28,836—————76. Pike: 28,237———————–76. Pike: 28,270
77. Van Wert: 28,744————77. Van Wert: 28,166—————-77. Van Wert: 28,217
78. Pike: 28,709——————-78. Adams: 27,832——————-78. Adams: 27,726
79. Adams: 28,550—————79. Carroll: 27,637——————–79. Carroll: 27,385
80. Henry: 28,215—————-80. Henry: 27,269———————80. Henry: 27,185
81. Meigs: 23,770—————-81. Meigs: 23,177———————81. Meigs: 23,080
82. Wyandot: 22,615————-82. Wyandot: 22,042—————-82. Wyandot: 22,029
83. Paulding: 19,614————83. Paulding: 18,839——————83. Paulding: 18,845
84. Harrison: 15,864————-84. Harrison: 15,257——————84. Harrison: 15,216
85. Morgan: 15,054————–85. Morgan: 14,762——————-85. Morgan: 14,709
86. Noble: 14,645—————–86. Noble: 14,443———————86. Noble: 14,406
87. Monroe: 14,642————–87. Monroe: 14,097——————–87. Monroe: 13,946
88. Vinton: 13,435—————-88. Vinton: 13,021———————88. Vinton: 13,092

Columbus’ counties tended to move up in the rankings 2010-2017.




Let’s now take a look at total growth for the periods July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017 and Census 2010 to July 1, 2017.
Census 2010-July 1, 2017————————-July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Franklin: +128,452—————————–1. Franklin: +21,983
2. Delaware: +26,275—————————–2. Hamilton: +3,735
3. Warren: +16,049——————————–3. Delaware: +3,687
4. Butler: +12,474———————————-4. Butler: +2,671
5. Hamilton: +11,435——————————5. Warren: +2,406
6. Fairfield: +8,556——————————–6. Fairfield: +2,052
7. Licking: +6,956———————————7. Greene: +1,643
8. Clermont: +6,862——————————-8. Licking: +1,626
9. Lorain: +6,555———————————–9. Medina: +1,468
10. Medina: +6,038——————————-10. Lorain: +1,334
11. Greene: +5,178——————————-11. Union: +1,285
12. Wood: +5,003———————————12. Clermont: +1,198
13. Union: +4,482———————————13. Lake: +847
14. Miami: +2,621———————————14. Summit: +834
15. Pickaway: +2,152—————————–15. Wood: +788
16. Athens: +1,833——————————–16. Miami: +740
17. Holmes: +1,593——————————–17. Madison: +682
18. Wayne: +1,522———————————18. Knox: +429
19. Hancock: +965———————————19. Ross: +403
20. Portage: +856———————————-20. Pickaway: +300
21. Madison: +598———————————21. Athens: +277
22. Geauga: +508———————————-22. Muskingum: +220
23. Ashland: +489———————————23. Ashland: +211
24. Knox: +331————————————-24. Hancock: +164
25. Morrow: +167———————————25. Mercer: +163
26. Lake: +67————————————–26. Ottawa: +162
27. Muskingum: +63—————————–27. Logan: +154
28. Mercer: +59———————————-28. Montgomery: +147
29. Perry: -15————————————-29. Clinton: +128
30. Clinton: -28———————————–30. Holmes: +125
31. Auglaize: -171——————————-31. Portage: +115
32. Noble: -239———————————–32. Champaign: +103
33. Fayette: -273——————————–33. Huron: +103
34. Tuscarawas: -285————————–34. Fayette: +90
35. Vinton: -338———————————35. Hocking: +88
36. Morgan: -347——————————-36. Vinton: +71
37. Coshocton: -354—————————37. Geauga: +70
38. Fulton: -409———————————38. Van Wert: +51
39. Pike: -432———————————–39. Morrow: +40
40. Van Wert: -526—————————-40. Defiance: +35
41. Logan: -529———————————41. Pike: +33
42. Summit: -554——————————-42. Shelby: +33
43. Wyandot: -586——————————43. Preble: +15
44. Putnam: -618——————————-44. Paulding: +6
45. Highland: -629—————————–45. Perry: +5
46. Harrison: -646——————————46. Wyandot: -13
47. Shelby: -659——————————–47. Auglaize: -19
48. Meigs: -687———————————48. Highland: -22
49. Hardin: -696——————————–49. Gallia: -23
50. Monroe: -696——————————-50. Fulton: -36
51. Ross: -752———————————-51. Noble: -37
52. Paulding: -770——————————52. Harrison: -41
53. Jackson: -777——————————53. Hardin: -43
54. Ottawa: -777——————————-54. Morgan: -53
55. Adams: -826——————————-55. Clark: -64
56. Williams: -864—————————–56. Brown: -68
57. Defiance: -875—————————-57. Henry: -84
58. Hocking: -899—————————–58. Jackson: -85
59. Gallia: -973——————————–59. Sandusky: -86
60. Guernsey: -998————————–60. Meigs: -97
61. Henry: -1,030—————————–61. Coshocton: -100
62. Huron: -1,131—————————–62. Darke: -100
63. Preble: -1,139—————————-63. Adams: -106
64. Champaign: -1,253———————64. Guernsey: -107
65. Brown: -1,267—————————-65. Seneca: -114
66. Washington: -1,360———————66. Washington: -117
67. Darke: -1,433—————————-67. Erie: -127
68. Carroll: -1,451—————————68. Williams: -137
69. Seneca: -1,499————————-69. Putnam: -138
70. Marion: -1,534————————–70. Monroe: -151
71. Sandusky: -1,751———————-71. Tuscarawas: -188
72. Crawford: -2,039———————–72. Carroll: -252
73. Lawrence: -2,199———————-73. Crawford: -291
74. Erie: -2,249—————————–74. Scioto: -311
75. Belmont: -2,373————————75. Ashtabula: -362
76. Stark: -3,050—————————-76. Marion: -367
77. Allen: -3,128—————————-77. Mahoning: -373
78. Jefferson: -3,350———————-78. Wayne: -384
79. Scioto: -3,568————————–79. Allen: -428
80. Montgomery: -3,634——————80. Lawrence: -480
81. Ashtabula: -3,681———————81. Belmont: -539
82. Clark: -3,790—————————82. Jefferson: -555
83. Richland: -3,887———————-83. Richland: -578
84. Columbiana: -4,764——————84. Columbiana: -667
85. Mahoning: -9,011———————85. Stark: -986
86. Trumbull: -9,938———————-86. Trumbull: -1,321
87. Lucas: -10,928————————87. Lucas: -1,675
88. Cuyahoga: -31,595——————88. Cuyahoga: -4,940

Finally, let’s examine the components of population change, but top 15 only.

Top 15 Counties with the Most Births Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Franklin: +134,9580———————————–1. Franklin: +19,039
2. Cuyahoga: +107,949———————————-2. Cuyahoga: +14,637
3. Hamilton: +79,087————————————-3. Hamilton: +10,787
4. Montgomery: +48,275——————————–4. Montgomery: +6,576
5. Summit: +44,151—————————————5. Summit: +5,945
6. Lucas: +40,874—————————————–6. Lucas: +5,494
7. Butler: +32,888—————————————–7. Butler: +4,531
8. Stark: +30,188——————————————8. Stark: +4,163
9. Lorain: +24,497—————————————-9. Lorain: +3,329
10. Warren: +17,492————————————-10. Mahoning: +2,382
11. Mahoning: +17,312———————————11. Warren: +2,376
12. Clermont: +16,980———————————-12. Clermont: +2,307
13. Lake: +16,465—————————————–13. Lake: +2,244
14. Delaware: +15,662———————————-14. Delaware: +2,146
15. Trumbull: +15,153———————————–15. Trumbull: +2,059

Top 15 Counties with the Fewest Births Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Noble: +1,020——————————————-1. Noble: +131
2. Morgan: +1,050—————————————–2. Monroe: +135
3. Vinton: +1,051——————————————-3. Morgan: +139
4. Monroe: +1,083—————————————–4. Vinton: +144
5. Harrison: +1,150—————————————-5. Harrison: +149
6. Paulding: +1,595—————————————-6. Paulding: +213
7. Meigs: +1,762——————————————-7. Meigs: +228
8. Wyandot: +1,849—————————————8. Wyandot: +240
9. Carroll: +2,011—————————————–9. Carroll: +271
10. Hocking: +2,282————————————-10. Henry: +291
11. Henry: +2,295—————————————–11. Hocking: +309
12. Van Wert: +2,373————————————-12. Adams: +322
13. Adams: +2,431—————————————-13. Pike: +328
14. Ottawa: +2,489—————————————-14. Van Wert: +328
15. Pike: +2,504——————————————–15. Ottawa: +334

Top 15 Counties with the Most Deaths Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Cuyahoga: -98,692———————————–1. Cuyahoga: -13,439
2. Franklin: -65,458————————————–2. Franklin: -9,542
3. Hamilton: -56,157————————————-3. Hamilton: -7,768
4. Montgomery: -42,353——————————-4. Montgomery: -5,883
5. Summit: -40,895————————————–5. Summit: -5,735
6. Lucas: -31,778—————————————-6. Lucas: -4,465
7. Stark: -29.531—————————————–7. Stark: -4,077
8. Butler: -22,747—————————————-8. Butler: -3,347
9. Mahoning: -22,021———————————–9. Lorain: -2,947
10. Lorain: -21,265————————————-10. Mahoning: -2,920
11. Trumbull: -18,189———————————-11. Trumbull: -2,459
12. Lake: -17,265—————————————-12. Lake: -2,444
13. Clark: -12,267—————————————-13. Warren: -1,785
14. Clermont: -11,924———————————-14. Clermont: -1,706
15. Warren: -11,411————————————-15. Clark: -1,680

Top 15 Counties with the Fewest Deaths Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Noble: -916————————————————1. Noble: -131
2. Vinton: -1,025———————————————2. Vinton: -147
3. Morgan: -1,215——————————————-3. Morgan: -152
4. Monroe: -1,260——————————————-4. Harrison: -186
5. Paulding: -1,405—————————————–5. Paulding: -186
6. Harrison: -1,449——————————————6. Monroe: -189
7. Wyandot: -1,756—————————————–7. Wyandot: -246
8. Meigs: -2,004———————————————8. Henry: -249
9. Henry: -2,007———————————————9. Carroll: -289
10. Hocking: -2,131—————————————10. Meigs: -290
11. Putnam: -2,153—————————————–11. Hocking: -294
12. Carroll: -2,191—————————————–12. Putnam: -303
13. Holmes: -2,191—————————————–13. Van Wert: -306
14. Van Wert: -2,275—————————————14. Morrow: -308
15. Hardin: -2,284——————————————-15. Fayette: -318

Top 15 Counties with the Highest Natural Increase (Births vs. Deaths) Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Franklin: +69,500————————————-1. Franklin: +9,497
2. Hamilton: +22,930————————————2. Hamilton: +3,019
3. Butler: +10,141—————————————-3. Cuyahoga: +1,198
4. Cuyahoga: +9,257————————————4. Butler: +1,184
5. Lucas: +9,096——————————————5. Lucas: +1,029
6. Delaware: +8,339————————————-6. Delaware: +1,013
7. Warren: +6,081—————————————-7. Montgomery: +693
8. Montgomery: +5,922——————————–8. Clermont: +601
9. Clermont: +5,056————————————-9. Warren: +591
10. Holmes: +3,410————————————–10. Holmes: +445
11. Fairfield: +3,380————————————-11. Guernsey: +414
12. Wayne: +3,313—————————————12. Licking: +408
13. Summit: +3,256————————————-13. Wayne: +406
14. Lorain: +3,232—————————————14. Lorain: +382
15. Licking: +3,173————————————–15. Fairfield: +378

Top 15 Counties with the Lowest Natural Increase (Births vs. Deaths) Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Mahoning: -4,709—————————————1. Mahoning: -538
2. Trumbull: -3,036—————————————-2. Trumbull: -400
3. Jefferson: -2,097—————————————–3. Jefferson: -276
4. Belmont: -1,370——————————————4. Lake: -200
5. Erie: -990————————————————–5. Belmont: -197
6. Ottawa: -977———————————————-6. Ottawa: -171
7. Columbiana: -891—————————————7. Washington: -134
8. Washington: -829—————————————8. Erie: -132
9. Lake: -800———————————————–9. Columbiana: -130
10. Clark: -694———————————————10. Clark: -119
11. Scioto: -493——————————————–11. Scioto: -68
12. Crawford: -363—————————————-12. Lawrence: -67
13. Ashtabula: -354—————————————13. Meigs: -62
14. Harrison: -299—————————————–14. Monroe: -54
15. Lawrence: -285—————————————15. Harrison: -37

Top 15 Counties with the Most Domestic Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Franklin: +18,270———————————-1. Franklin: +5,861
2. Delaware: +15,671———————————2. Delaware: +2,346
3. Warren: +6,996————————————-3. Fairfield: +1,491
4. Fairfield: +4,106————————————4. Warren: +1,332
5. Licking: +3,332————————————-5. Licking: +1,137
6. Medina: +2,900————————————-6. Medina: +1,058
7. Union: +1,953—————————————7. Union: +871
8. Pickaway: +1,489———————————-8. Greene: +763
9. Wood: +1,447—————————————9. Lake: +748
10. Clermont: +1,372——————————–10. Butler: +668
11. Miami: +1,293————————————-11. Madison: +639
12. Ottawa: +224————————————–12. Miami: +547
13. Madison: +177————————————13. Clermont: +515
14. Morgan: -186————————————–14. Ross: +379
15. Lorain: -271—————————————-15. Ottawa: +337

Top 15 Counties with the Least Domestic Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Cuyahoga: -65,672————————————-1. Cuyahoga: -10,087
2. Hamilton: -25,292—————————————2. Lucas: -3,249
3. Lucas: -23,401——————————————-3. Montgomery: -1,656
4. Montgomery: -16,752———————————-4. Hamilton: -1,533
5. Summit: -10,630—————————————–5. Stark: -1,232
6. Trumbull: -6,852—————————————–6. Trumbull: -923
7. Mahoning: -6,113—————————————7. Wayne: -897
8. Allen: -4,673———————————————–8. Allen: -618
9. Stark: -4,510———————————————-9. Richland: -613
10. Richland: -4,240—————————————-10. Columbiana: -528
11. Columbiana: -3,802————————————11. Portage: -425
12. Ashtabula: -3,779—————————————12. Ashtabula: -412
13. Scioto: -3,267——————————————–13. Lawrence: -392
14. Clark: -3,198———————————————14. Marion: -389
15. Portage: -2,797—————————————–15. Tuscarawas: -382

Top 15 Counties with the Most International Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Franklin: +40,914—————————————1. Franklin: +6,584
2. Cuyahoga: +24,799————————————2. Cuyahoga: +3,961
3. Hamilton: +14,063————————————–3. Hamilton: +2,288
4. Montgomery: +7,418————————————4. Montgomery: +1,131
5. Summit: +7,132——————————————5. Summit: +1,101
6. Butler: +5,226——————————————–6. Butler: +839
7. Lorain: +3,810——————————————–7. Lorain: +641
8. Greene: +3,443——————————————8. Portage: +546
9. Portage: +3,281—————————————–9. Lucas: +539
10. Lucas: +3,247——————————————10. Warren: +499
11. Warren: +3,140—————————————-11. Greene: +473
12. Delaware: +2,178————————————-12. Delaware: +336
13. Athens: +2,081—————————————–13. Athens: +326
14. Mahoning: +1,917————————————-14. Mahoning: +326
15. Lake: +1,740——————————————–15. Lake: +314

Top 15 Counties with the Least International Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Lawrence: -168——————————————1. Lawrence: -19
2. Belmont: -113——————————————–2. Belmont: -18
3. Jefferson: -108——————————————-3. Jefferson: -16
4. Columbiana: -44—————————————–4. Columbiana: -7
5. Williams: -40———————————————-5. Williams: -6
6. Brown: -39————————————————6. Brown: -4
7. Holmes: -16———————————————–7. Holmes: -3
8. Monroe: -5————————————————8. Monroe: -1
9. Vinton: -2————————————————–9. Van Wert: -1
10. Meigs: 0————————————————10. Harrison: 0
11. Trumbull: +2——————————————-11. Ottawa: 0
12. Harrison: +4——————————————-12. Vinton: 0
13. Adams: +7———————————————13. Meigs: +1
14. Van Wert: +10—————————————-14. Noble: +1
15. Noble: +10——————————————–15. Pike: +1
16. Morgan: +10

Top 15 Counties with the Most Net Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Franklin: +59,184—————————————1. Franklin: +12,445
2. Delaware: +17,849————————————–2. Delaware: +2,682
3. Warren: +10,136—————————————-3. Warren: +1,831
4. Fairfield: +5,274—————————————–4. Fairfield: +1,686
5. Licking: +3,928——————————————5. Butler: +1,507
6. Lorain: +3,539——————————————–6. Greene: +1,236
7. Medina: +3,492——————————————-7. Licking: +1,225
8. Wood: +2,720———————————————8. Medina: +1,142
9. Butler: +2,527——————————————–9. Lake: +1,062
10. Union: +2,415—————————————–10. Lorain: +969
11. Greene: +2,038—————————————-11. Union: +952
12. Clermont: +1,975————————————-12. Hamilton: +755
13. Miami: +1,662——————————————-13. Madison: +679
14. Pickaway: +1,556————————————-14. Summit: +649
15. Athens: +1,285——————————————15. Clermont +609

Top 15 Counties with the Least Net Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Cuyahoga: -40,873————————————1. Cuyahoga: -6,126
2. Lucas: -20,154——————————————2. Lucas: -2,710
3. Hamilton: -11,229————————————–3. Stark: -1,061
4. Montgomery: -9,334———————————–4. Trumbull: -918
5. Trumbull: -6,850—————————————-5. Wayne: -794
6. Allen: -4,504———————————————6. Allen: -596
7. Mahoning: -4,196————————————–7. Richland: -587
8. Richland: -4,087—————————————-8. Columbiana: -535
9. Columbiana: -3,846————————————9. Montgomery: -525
10. Summit: -3,496—————————————-10. Lawrence: -411
11. Stark: -3,408——————————————-11. Marion: -379
12. Ashtabula: -3,327————————————-12. Belmont: -341
13. Scioto: -3,064——————————————13. Ashtabula: -336
14. Clark: -3,032——————————————–14. Tuscarawas: -326
15. Huron: -2,359——————————————-15. Holmes: -319

So there you have it for counties. Part 2 on Metro and CSAs will be coming soon!




Where Racial Groups are Growing Fastest in Franklin County



The US Census recently released updated estimates for 2016 for smaller-area designations like tracts and blocks. Looking at them, I wanted to see where individual racial groups were growing the fastest at that level.
The first map is based on the % change from 2010 to 2016.

What’s interesting about this map is that it is such a hodgepodge. No single part of the county is dominated by growth in any specific racial group. However, a few things can be generally determined. For example, almost all of the tracts where the White population is growing the fastest are within I-270, and the majority of those within the eastern half of the Columbus in what have long been dominated by Black majority populations. These areas include parts of Linden, the Near South and Near East sides. That said, the White population was growing the fastest in just 30 census tracts by % change. This compared to 53 for the Black population, 83 for the Asian population and 107 for the Hispanic population.

The next map takes a slightly different approach, measuring the TOTAL change in population, rather than by %.

Again, a hodgepodge, but much less so than before. Instead of being the fastest-growing in just 30 tracts, the White population rockets up to 108 tracts. This shows that, while Asian and Hispanic populations have respectable % growth, this is largely based on comparatively small population bases. Still, non-White populations are clearly making inroads throughout Franklin County.

The Midwest Beat the South in Regional Domestic Migration in 2016




For years, if not decades, we’ve been hearing a familiar tale- that anyone and everyone is moving from the Midwest and Northeast to the South and West. This trend began during and after the collapse of Northern manufacturing, and as higher cost of living began to make the lower-cost South more attractive in particular. However, a lot of the South’s growth over the years- indeed a majority- never had anything to do with region-to-region migration. Instead, it was due largely to natural growth (births vs. deaths) and international migration, particularly from Central America. What received all the attention, though, was the belief that people were packing up and moving to the South from places like Ohio and other struggling Northern states. While that may have been true for a while, that is increasingly looking like it is no longer the case.

The Midwest, especially, has been derided as the region no one wants to live in. Despite its growing population approaching 66 million people, the common refrain was that its colder winters, flailing economies and questionable demographic future meant that it was simply a region being left behind by the booming Southern states.

Recently, the US Census released estimates for 2015-2016 geographic mobility, and they tell a very different story altogether.

First, let’s look at the total domestic migration moving to the Midwest from other regions.
South to Midwest: +309,000
West to Midwest: +72,000
Northeast to Midwest: +61,000
Total to Midwest: +442,000

And then compare that to the total that the Midwest sends to other regions.
Midwest to South: -254,000
Midwest to West: -224,000
Midwest to Northeast: -34,000
Total from Midwest: -512,000

Net difference by region.
Midwest vs. South: +55,000
Midwest vs. West: -152,000
Midwest vs. Northeast: +27,000
Total Net: -70,000

So while the Midwest is seeing an overall net domestic migration loss, it is entirely to the Western states.

This could just be an off year, as almost all recent years showed losses to the South, but then again, maybe not. The South has been in a boom for several decades now, and in that time, the region still lags the other 3 in almost every quality of life metric used. All booms end eventually, and the South’s 2 biggest perceived advantages, low cost of living and business-friendly climate, have been gradually eroding over time. As Census surveys show, people don’t actually move for a change in weather, so it’s the economic factors that are going to make the biggest impacts long-term. The Midwest now has many cities and several states that are doing well economically, including Columbus, and perhaps they are becoming more attractive than they have in many years. Time will tell, but last year, the narrative of an unattractive Midwest vs. South was at least temporarily shelved.

Before and After April 2017



**Note: Some photos have been updated for 2018.

I haven’t done a Before and After installment for a while. This time around, I chose to not focus on any single neighborhood.

First up is a photo of the construction of the Columbus Interurban Terminal, looking northwest from 3rd. The photo was taken on October 5, 1911, about 3 months before the building opened. The interurban system was relatively short-lived in the city, and the terminal closed after only 26 years in 1938. The building survived as a grocery store through the mid-1960s before the building was demolished in 1967 as part of the construction of the Greyhound Bus Terminal across the street. The actual location of the building was not on the Greyhound site, but was used as an overflow parking lot. It remained a parking lot until the mid-1980s, when it became part of the City Centre Mall site. Today, plans are for the site to become the location for the 12-story, 80 on the Commons mixed-use project.

October, 1911.

Here is the same place in October, 2018.

The second historic photo is of the #57 streetcar on Kelton Avenue just south of the Oak Street intersection. The photo, which looks north, was taken on June 30, 1915 and includes 3 separate visible buildings as well. The house on the left actually survived until 1977, when it and the rest of the east half of the block was demolished. The building visible on the right is the surviving streetcar barn. Today, it is in bad shape, and while many would like to see it renovated and saved, time seems to be running out. The other surviving building, barely visible in the 1915 photo, is the tenement building on the northwest corner of Oak and Kelton.

And in 2015:

Third in this list is a photo of the demolition of the old Franklin County Jail, once located at 36 E. Fulton Street in Downtown. Built in 1889, the structure survived until the fall of 1971, when the building, which by then had become outdated for its intended purpose, was torn down to make way for- what else- a parking garage. The parking garage remains to the present day. Columbus leaders at the time should’ve been flogged for such short-sighted thinking, something that was repeated over and over and over again during that era. Today, such a very cool, unique building would’ve made an excellent candidate for mixed-use conversion.

And in August, 2016:

Finally, this next photo isn’t really historic. It was taken a mere 15 years ago in February, 2002, looking northwest from the corner of N. High Street and 10th Avenue. At the time, this area had been made up of low-rise historic buildings that had long held bars for OSU students. All these buildings in the photo, and many more, were demolished not long after the photo was taken in order to make room for the South Campus Gateway, now more or less just called the Gateway. Similar large-scale demolitions are taking place to the north and south as the entirety of the High Street corridor around Campus is transformed. Whether that is good or bad depends on who you ask. What can be agreed upon, however, is that the corridor will be almost unrecognizable in the end.

And in October, 2016:



2016 County and Metro Area Population Estimates




The numbers for July 1, 2016 population estimates came out this morning. Nationally, it seems that overall growth rates slowed down from where they were the year prior, and there were some surprising results in a few cases.

First, let’s take a look at the core counties for Columbus and its peer/Midwest counterparts nationally. The core city is in parenthesis.
2010—————————————————2015———————————2016

1. Cook (Chicago): 5,194,675————-1. Cook: 5,224,823————-1. Cook: 5,203,499
2. Clark (Las Vegas): 1,951,269———-2. Clark: 2,109,289————-2. Clark: 2,155,664
3. Wayne (Detroit): 1,820,584————-3. Santa Clara: 1,910,105—-3. Bexar: 1,928,680
4. Santa Clara (San Jose): 1,781,642—4. Bexar: 1,895,482—4. Santa Clara: 1,919,402
5. Bexar (San Antonio): 1,714,773——-5. Wayne: 1,757,062———5. Wayne: 1,749,366
6. Sacramento (Sac.): 1,418,788–6. Sacramento: 1,496,664–6. Sacramento: 1,414,460
7. Cuyahoga (Cleveland): 1,280,122—7. Orange: 1,284,864——–7. Orange: 1,314,367
8. Allegheny (Pittsburgh): 1,223,348—8. Cuyahoga: 1,255,025—-8. Franklin: 1,264,518
9. Franklin (Columbus): 1,163,414—–9. Franklin: 1,250,269—–9. Cuyahoga: 1,249,352
10. Hennepin (Minn.): 1,152,425—10. Allegheny: 1,229,298—-10. Hennepin: 1,232,483
11. Orange (Orlando): 1,145,951—11. Hennepin: 1,220,459—-11. Allegheny: 1,225,365
12. Travis (Austin): 1,024,266——12. Travis: 1,174,818——12. Travis: 1,199,323
13. Milwaukee (Mil): 947,735–13. Mecklenburg: 1,033,466–13. Mecklenburg: 1,054,835
14. Mecklenburg (Charl.): 919,628–14. Milwaukee: 956,314—14. Milwaukee: 951,448
15. Marion (Indianapolis): 903,393—15. Marion: 938,058———–15. Marion: 941,229
16. Hamilton (Cincinnati): 802,374—16. Hamilton: 807,748——–16. Hamilton: 809,099
17. Multnomah (Portland): 735,334–17. Multnomah: 789,125—17. Multnomah: 799,766
18. Jackson (Kansas City): 674,158–18. Jackson: 686,373——-18. Jackson: 691,801
19. Davidson (Nashville): 626,667—19. Davidson: 678,323——-19. Davidson: 684,410
20. Providence (Providence): 626,671–20. Kent: 636,095———20. Kent: 642,173
21. Kent (Grand Rapids): 602,622–21. Providence: 632,488—-21. Providence: 633,673
22. Summit (Akron): 541,781———22. Douglas: 549,168——–22. Douglas: 554,995
23. Montgomery (Dayton): 535,153–23. Summit: 541,316——–23. Summit: 540,300
24. Douglas (Omaha): 517,110–24. Montgomery: 531,567——24. Dane: 531,273
25. Sedgwick (Wichita): 498,365–25. Dane: 522,878———–25. Montgomery: 531,239
26. Dane (Madison): 488,073——-26. Sedgwick: 510,360——26. Sedgwick: 511,995
27. Lucas (Toledo): 441,815——–27. Polk: 466,688————–27. Polk: 474,045
28. Virginia Beach (VB): 437,994–28. Virginia Beach: 451,854–28. Vir. Beach: 452,602
29. Polk (Des Moines): 430,640—-29. Lucas: 433,496————-29. Lucas: 432,488
30. Allen (Fort Wayne): 355,359—30. Allen: 368,040————-30. Allen: 370,404
31. St. Louis (St. Louis): 319,294–31. St. Louis: 314,875———31. St. Louis: 311,404
32. Lancaster (Lincoln): 285,407—32. Lancaster: 305,705——-32. Lancaster: 309,637
33. Mahoning (Youngstown): 238,823–33. Mahoning: 231,767–33. Mahoning: 230,008

Franklin County moved up one spot to 8th most populated core county of the group.

Total Core County Growth of the 33 Cities Census July 1, 2015 to July 1, 2016
1. Clark-Las Vegas: +46,375
2. Bexar-San Antonio: +33,198
3. Orange-Orlando: +29,503
4. Travis-Austin: +24,505
5. Mecklenburg-Charlotte: +21,369
6. Sacramento-Sacramento: +17,816
7. Franklin-Columbus: +14,249
8. Hennepin-Minneapolis: +12,024
9. Multnomah-Portland: +10,641
10. Santa Clara-San Jose: +9,297
11. Dane-Madison: +8,395
12. Polk-Des Moines: +7,357
13. Davidson-Nashville: +6,087
14. Kent-Grand Rapids: +6,078
15. Douglas-Omaha: +5,827
16. Jackson-Kansas City: +5,428
17. Lancaster-Lincoln: +3,932
18. Marion-Indianapolis: +3,171
19. Allen-Fort Wayne: +2,364
20. Sedgwick-Wichita: +1,635
21. Hamilton-Cincinnati: +1,351
22. Providence-Providence: +1,185
23. Virginia Beach-Virginia Beach: +748
24. Montgomery-Dayton: -328
25. Lucas-Toledo: -1,008
26. Summit-Akron: -1,016
27. Mahoning-Youngstown: -1,759
28. St. Louis-St. Louis: -3,471
29. Allegheny-Pittsburgh: -3,933
30. Milwaukee-Milwaukee: -4,866
31. Cuyahoga-Cleveland: -5,673
32. Wayne-Detroit: -7,696
33. Cook-Chicago: -21,324

And Total Core County Population Change Census 2010 to July 1, 2016 for the 33
1. Bexar: +213,907
2. Clark: +204,395
3. Travis: +175,057
4. Orange: +168,416
5. Santa Clara: +137,760
6. Mecklenburg: +135,207
7. Franklin: +101,104
8. Sacramento: +95,672
9. Hennepin: +80,058
10. Multnomah: +64,432
11. Davidson: +57,729
12. Polk: +43,405
13. Dane: +43,200
14. Kent: +39,551
15. Douglas: +37,885
16. Marion: +37,836
17. Lancaster: +24,230
18. Jackson: +17,643
19. Allen: +15,075
20. Virginia Beach: +14,608
21. Sedgwick: +13,630
22. Cook: +8,824
23. Providence: +7,006
24. Hamilton: +6,725
25. Milwaukee: +3,713
26. Allegheny: +2,017
27. Summit: -1,481
28. Montgomery: 3,914
29. St. Louis: -7,890
30. Mahoning: -8,815
31. Lucas: -9,327
32. Cuyahoga: -30,770
33. Wayne: -71,218

Here are the metro populations for the above 33 cities.
2010—————————————————————————–2016

1. Chicago: 9,461,105———————————————–1. Chicago: 9,512,999
2. Detroit: 4,296,250————————————————-2. Detroit: 4,297,617
3. Minneapolis: 3,348,859——————————————3. Minneapolis: 3,551,036
4. St. Louis: 2,787,701———————————————-4. St. Louis: 2,807,002
5. Pittsburgh: 2,356,285——————————————–5. Charlotte: 2,474,314
6. Portland: 2,226,009———————————————–6. Orlando: 2,441,257
7. Charlotte: 2,217,012———————————————-7. San Antonio: 2,429,609
8. Sacramento: 2,149,127——————————————8. Portland: 2,424,955
9. San Antonio: 2,142,508——————————————9. Pittsburgh: 2,342,299
10. Orlando: 2,134,411———————————————-10. Sacramento: 2,296,418
11. Cincinnati: 2,114,580——————————————–11. Cincinnati: 2,165,139
12. Cleveland: 2,077,240——————————————–12. Las Vegas: 2,155,664
13. Kansas City: 2,009,342——————————————13. Kansas City: 2,104,509
14. Las Vegas: 1,951,269——————————————-14. Austin: 2,056,405
15. Columbus: 1,901,974——————————————–15. Cleveland: 2,055,612
16. Indianapolis: 1,887,877——————————————16. Columbus: 2,041,520
17. San Jose: 1,836,911———————————————-17. Indianapolis: 2,004,230
18. Austin: 1,716,289————————————————–18. San Jose: 1,978,816
19. Virginia Beach: 1,676,822—————————————19. Nashville: 1,865,298
20. Nashville: 1,670,890———————————————20. Virginia Beach: 1,726,907
21. Providence: 1,600,852——————————————21. Providence: 1,614,750
22. Milwaukee: 1,555,908——————————————-22. Milwaukee: 1,572,482
23. Grand Rapids: 988,938—————————————–23. Grand Rapids: 1,047,099
24. Omaha: 865,350————————————————-24. Omaha: 924,129
25. Dayton: 799,232————————————————-25. Dayton: 800,683
26. Akron: 703,200—————————————————26. Akron: 702,221
27. Wichita: 630,919————————————————-27. Madison: 648,929
28. Toledo: 610,001————————————————–28. Wichita: 644,672
29. Madison: 605,435————————————————29. Des Moines: 634,725
30. Des Moines: 569,633——————————————-30. Toledo: 605,221
31. Youngstown: 565,773——————————————31. Youngstown: 544,746
32. Fort Wayne: 416,257——————————————-32. Fort Wayne: 431,802
33. Lincoln: 302,157————————————————-33. Lincoln: 326,921

The Columbus metro fell one spot in this list, but should recover it next year.

Total Metro Area Population Change July 1,2015 to July 1, 2016 for the 33
1. Orlando: +59,125
2. Austin: +58,301
3. Charlotte: +49,671
4. San Antonio: +47,906
5. Las Vegas: +46,375
6. Portland: +40,148
7. Nashville: +36,337
8. Minneapolis: +32,784
9. Sacramento: +28,830
10. Columbus: +21,376
11. Kansas City: +20,045
12. Indianapolis: +17,688
13. Des Moines: +12,145
14. San Jose: +10,238
15. Omaha: +9,861
16. Cincinnati: +9,747
17. Grand Rapids: +8,762
18. Madison: +8,315
19. Lincoln: +4,094
20. Virginia Beach: +3,439
21. Fort Wayne: +2,430
22. Providence: +2,176
23. Wichita: +1,656
24. Dayton: +883
25. Detroit: +79
26. Toledo: -358
27. Akron: -1,137
28. St. Louis: -1,328
29. Milwaukee: -1,867
32. Cleveland: -4,317
31. Youngstown: -4,644
32. Pittsburgh: -8,972
33. Chicago: -19,570

And the Total Metro Area Population Change Census 2010 to July 1, 2016
1. Austin: +340,085
2. Orlando: +306,858
3. San Antonio: +287,093
4. Charlotte: +257,340
5. Las Vegas: +204,395
6. Minneapolis: +202,177
7. Portland: +198,943
8. Nashville: +194,415
9. Sacramento: +147,274
10. San Jose: +141,875
11. Columbus: +139,517
12. Indianapolis: +116,148
13. Kansas City: +95,171
14. Des Moines: +65,092
15. Omaha: +58,773
16. Grand Rapids: +58,159
17. Chicago: +51,449
18. Cincinnati: +50,388
19. Virginia Beach: +50,090
20. Madison: +43,492
21. Lincoln: +24,764
22. St. Louis: +19,243
23. Milwaukee: +16,528
24. Fort Wayne: +15,548
25. Wichita: +13,753
26. Providence: +13,550
27. Dayton: +1,464
28. Detroit: +1,304
29. Akron: -982
30. Toledo: -4,780
31. Pittsburgh: -13,992
32. Youngstown: -21,053
33. Cleveland: -21,646

Now let’s take a closer look at Ohio only.

Top 20 Most-Populated Ohio Counties
2010————————————————-2016

1. Cuyahoga: 1,280,122—————-1. Franklin: 1,264,518
2. Franklin: 1,163,414——————-2. Cuyahoga: 1,249,352
3. Hamilton: 802,374——————–3. Hamilton: 809,099
4. Summit: 541,781———————-4. Summit: 540,300
5. Montgomery: 535,153—————5. Montgomery: 531,239
6. Lucas: 441,815————————6. Lucas: 432,488
7. Stark: 375,586————————-7. Butler: 377,537
8. Butler: 368,130————————8. Stark: 373,612
9. Lorain: 301,356———————–9. Lorain: 306,365
10. Mahoning: 238,823—————-10. Mahoning: 230,008
11. Lake: 230,041———————–11. Lake: 228,614
12. Warren: 212,693——————–12. Warren: 227,063
13. Trumbull: 210,312——————13. Clermont: 203,022
14. Clermont: 197,363——————14. Trumbull: 201,825
15. Delaware: 174,214—————–15. Delaware: 196,463
16. Medina: 172,332——————–16. Medina: 177,221
17. Licking: 166,492———————17. Licking: 172,198
18. Greene: 161,573———————18. Greene: 164,765
19. Portage: 161,419——————–19. Portage: 161,921
20. Fairfield: 146,156——————–20. Fairfield: 152,597

Top 10 Fastest-Growing Counties July 1, 2015 to July 1, 2016
1. Franklin: +14,249
2. Delaware: +3,579
3. Warren: +2,624
4. Butler: +2,078
5. Licking: +1,439
6. Hamilton: +1,351
7. Fairfield: +1,271
8. Clermont: +1,231
9. Lorain: +1,152
10. Union: +1,142

Top 10 Fastest-Declining Counties July 1, 2015 to July 1, 2016
1. Cuyahoga: -5,673
2. Trumbull: -1,806
3. Mahoning: -1,759
4. Stark: -1,253
5. Clark: -1,029
6. Summit: -1,016
7. Lucas: -1,008
8. Columbiana: -998
9. Madison: -684
10. Scioto: -664

Top 10 Fastest-Growing Counties Census 2010 to July 1, 2016
1. Franklin: +100,989
2. Delaware: +22,274
3. Warren: +14,195
4. Butler: +9,402
5. Hamilton: +6,731
6. Fairfield: +6,420
7. Licking: +5,706
8. Clermont: +5,659
9. Lorain: +5,009
10. Medina: +4,888

Top 10 Fastest-Declining Counties Census 2010 to July 1, 2016
1. Cuyahoga: -30,757
2. Lucas: -9,327
3. Mahoning: -8,799
4. Trumbull: -8,493
5. Columbiana: -4,156
6. Montgomery: -3,897
7. Clark: -3,547
8. Scioto: -3,411
9. Richland: -3,368
10. Ashtabula: -3,257




Summer 2016



Now that Summer 2016 is but a memory, let’s take a quick look back at where it stands in the record books.

Temperature

Summer 2016 Means
June-August Mean High: 85.5
June-August Mean Rank since 1878: 26th Warmest
While the average high for Summer 2016 was certainly warm, it fell just outside of the top 25. By comparison to recent years, 2010 (85.6), 2011 (85.7) and 2012 (87.7) all had warmer average highs.

June-August Mean Low: 66.1
June-August Mean Low Rank since 1878: 4th Warmest
The average low for the summer is what made 2016 much more exceptional. No recent years (last decade) were warmer, although 2010 did tie.

June-August Mean: 75.8
June-August Mean Rank since 1878: 10th
So if you thought this summer was hot, well you were right. Only 2010 (75.9) and 2012 (76.4) were warmer of any recent years.

Monthly Means
June Mean: 73.2
June Mean Rank since 1878: 17th Warmest
July Mean: 76.6
July Mean Rank since 1878: 20th Warmest
August Mean: 77.6
August Mean Rank since 1878: 6th Warmest
The summer gradually became hotter as it went on.

Summer 2016 Misc. Temperature Stats
# of 90+ Days: 18
90+ Days Rank: 22nd
Warmest High: 95
Warmest Low: 77
Coldest High: 72
Coldest Low: 48

Daily Temperature Records
June 11th: Record Warm Maximum Tie: 95: Tied with 1914 and 1933.
August 10th: Record Warm Minimum Tie: 75: Tied with 2001.
August 11th: Record Warm Minimum Tie: 76: Tied with 1918.
August 12th: Record Warm Minimum: 76: Beat record from 1947.
August 13th: Record Warm Minimum Tie: 75: Tied with 1995.

Precipitation
June-July Precipitation Total: 13.53″
June-July Precipitation Rank since 1878: 29th Wettest
Besides being warm, Summer 2016 was also fairly wet.

Monthly Precipitation Stats
June Precipitation: 5.22″
June Precipitation Rank since 1878: 29th
July Precipitation: 2.49″
July Precipitation Rank since 1878: 27th Driest
August Precipitation: 5.82″
August Precipitation Rank since 1878: 13th Wettest
So the summer was bookended by wet months with July being fairly dry.

Summer 2016 Misc. Precipitation Stats
Total Precipitation Days (including Trace): 45
Total Measurable Precipitation Days: 30
Measurable Precipitation Days Rank since 1878: 16th Highest
Days with 0.25″ or Higher: 16
Days with 0.50″ or Higher: 10
Days with 1.00″ or Higher: 4

Daily Precipitation Records
June 23rd: 2.75″: Beat the old record in 1901.

The Real Makeup of the Columbus Economy




Over the years, there have been endless claims about how the Columbus economy is dominated by jobs related to state government and OSU. These claims are usually made from other Ohioans complaining that Columbus has an unfair advantage and is mooching public dollars from the rest of the state to prop up the economy.

Let’s first address two points made: 1. That the number of government jobs is far above what they are in all other major Ohio cities, and 2. That overall, government jobs are becoming a larger slice of the metro economy.

The first claim is easy to look into. The Bureau of Labor Statistics, or BLS, produces numbers every single month on job industry numbers by metro area. The most recent numbers are from June 2016.
Here are the total government jobs for Ohio’s largest cities.
Columbus: 162,600
Cleveland: 138,800
Cincinnati: 124,200
Dayton: 62,300
Toledo: 44,800
Akron: 40,600

So as to the first claim, that the total of government jobs in Columbus is higher than the other cities, that is true. As the state capital, this is no surprise. However, how dependent on government jobs is Columbus really versus those other cities? To find out, you have to divide government jobs by all total jobs within the metro. In June 2016, here was the percentage of the total.

Dayton: 16.17%
Columbus: 15.30%
Toledo: 14.21%
Cleveland: 12.90%
Akron: 11.84%
Cincinnati: 11.43%

Interestingly enough, Columbus is not the top government-dependent city. That spot goes to Dayton.

Now onto the 2nd claim- that Columbus is increasingly reliant on those government jobs. Let’s look at the % of total jobs that government jobs made up going back to 1990. The figures are for June of each year given.

1990: 17.97%
1995: 17.25%
2000: 15.97%
2005: 17.18%
2010: 17.81%
2015: 15.34%
2016: 15.30%

So it does not appear that Columbus has become more or less dependent on government jobs over the last 26 years. Indeed, if there is any pattern at all, it appears that during economic downturns, the number of government jobs increase, and during periods of stability/recovery, government jobs decline. The early 1990s and late 2000s had high levels of governments jobs, both periods of recession. In June 2016, nearly 85% of the local economy was not government-related, not statistically much different than other Ohio cities.

Finally, let’s look at how total government jobs have changed since the beginning of this decade, 2010, by Ohio city. The figures are for June 2010 and June 2016.

Toledo: +2.75%
Columbus: -0.91%
Cleveland: -1.56%
Cincinnati: -3.72%
Dayton: -4.30%
Akron: -10.38%

All cities except Toledo have seen declines.

So that brings us to the actual makeup of the Columbus metro economy. What are the industries that most people work for? What are the industries that have the greatest % of the total jobs? Let’s compare June 1990 and June 2016.

1990
Trade/Transportation/Utilities: 20.51%
Government: 17.97%
Manufacturing: 13.49%
Professional and Business Services: 11.46%
Health and Education: 9.41%
Leisure and Hospitality: 8.63%
Financial Activities: 8.26%
Mining/Logging/Construction: 4.30%
Other Services: 3.46%
Information: 2.51%

2016
Trade/Transportation/Utilities: 18.37%
Professional and Business Services: 17.11%
Government: 15.30%
Health and Education: 14.43%
Leisure and Hospitality: 10.89%
Financial Activities: 7.63%
Manufacturing: 6.84%
Other Services: 4.10%
Mining/Logging/Construction: 3.75%
Information: 1.57%

If anything, Columbus’ economy is actually more diverse in 2016 than it was in 1990, not less.