Google Map Links




Columbus Development Maps

2010-2013 Development
2014-2019 Development
2020-2025 Development
All these pages are basically just map versions of the development pages. However, the maps are organized by year and include before and after photos of the development sites.

Columbus Fantasy Transit Map

2019 Transit Map
The transit map for the Columbus Metro Area is just one example of many existing fantasy maps for Central Ohio. This one includes routes for light rail, BRT (Bus Rapid Transit) and interurban rail to neighboring counties.

The Redevelopment of Westland Mall
Mall Site
Westland Mall and the larger surrounding area is in desperate need of a revamp. Recently, a proposal to make the site into a “Weston” development in the potential style of Easton has emerged. I made this map several years ago as a basic blueprint for how the entire area could be rebuilt into a much more urban, walkable, vibrant corridor.

Ohio Severe Weather Report Maps by Decade

1950-1959 Severe Reports
1960-1960 Severe Reports
1970-1979 Severe Reports
2010-2019 Severe Reports
The 1950s and 1960s maps are the only ones completed so far.

Columbus Area Bike Lanes, Multi-use Paths and Sidewalk Infrastructure

Bike Infrastructure
This map attempts to include all the existing bike and multi-use infrastructure in the area, along with general pedestrian infrastructure. The map will is not fully updated yet through 2019.

Downtown Columbus Parking Infrastructure

Parking Lots and Garages
This map, last updated in 2015, documents all existing parking garages and surfaces lots throughout Downtown.

The Origins of the Columbus Metro’s Domestic Migration




Top 30 Largest Net Domestic In-Migration Origins (Ohio Counties and States)

Numbers are based on estimates. Updated 1/24/2018 with 2011-2015 data.

2006-2010————————2009-2013—————————-2011-2015
1. Cuyahoga: 1602———-1. Cuyahoga: 1905————–1. Cuyahoga: 1842
2. Montgomery: 1020——-2. Michigan: 1425—————-2. Michigan: 1239
3. Michigan: 893————-3. Montgomery: 1123————3. Montgomery: 1088
4. Maryland: 745————-4. Summit: 744——————–4. Summit: 764
5. Lorain: 740—————–5. Lorain: 715———————-5. Lucas: 626
6. Virginia: 636—————6. Indiana: 694———————6. New Jersey: 608
7. Mahoning: 603————7. Lucas: 569———————–7. New York: 575
8. Stark: 584——————8. Maryland: 512——————-8. Medina: 572
9. Lucas: 554—————–9. Hamilton: 504——————–9. Stark: 484
10. Summit: 531————-10. Clermont: 466—————–10. Trumbull: 465
11. Highland: 499———–11. Stark: 466———————–11. Maryland: 464
12. New Jersey: 497——-12. Arizona: 463——————–12. Allen: 406
13. Hamilton: 483———–13. Alabama: 431——————-13. Washington (state): 399
14. New York: 419———-14. Trumbull: 401——————-14. Erie: 386
15. Allen: 384—————-15. Mahoning: 387——————15. Indiana: 386
16. Tennessee: 375——–16. Fayette: 354———————16. Massachusetts: 384
17. Logan: 328—————17. Washington (state): 353—–17. Pennsylvania: 371
18. Trumbull: 325————18. Coshocton: 346—————-18. Kentucky: 368
19. Coshocton: 310———19. Medina: 322——————–19. W. Virginia: 339
20. Jefferson: 290———–20. Allen: 302————————20. Lake: 316
21. Scioto: 259—————21. Erie: 290————————-21. Belmont: 314
22. Belmont: 254————22. Highland: 270——————-22. Wayne: 298
23. Huron: 245—————23. Puerto Rico: 265—————23. Fayette: 290
24. Darke: 217—————24. Adams: 260———————24. Mahoning: 289
25. Lake: 212—————-25. Warren: 260———————25. New Hampshire: 288
26. Tuscarawas: 202——-26. Massachusetts: 259———-26. Alaska: 282
27. Iowa: 200—————–27. Wayne: 259———————27. Alabama: 280
28. Shelby: 199————–28. Morgan: 255——————–28. Lorain: 277
29. Medina: 196————-29. Tuscarawas: 253————–29. Tuscarawas: 277
30. Massachusetts: 192—30. Ashtabula: 244—————–30. Geauga: 261

Top 30 Largest Net Domestic Out-Migration Destinations (Ohio counties and States)
2006-2010——————————-2009-2013—————————-2011-2015

1. Texas: -1371———————-1. Georgia: -1024—————-1. Florida: -1333
2. Knox: -942————————-2. Florida: -1013——————2. Missouri: -703
3. North Carolina: -782————3. Greene: -524——————-3. Georgia: -680
4. Georgia: -718———————4. Missouri: -516——————4. Athens: -607
5. Athens: -679———————-5. Colorado: -448—————–5. Knox: -506
6. Kentucky: -516——————-6. California: -436—————–6. Tennessee: -442
7. South Carolina: -499———–7. South Carolina: -431———-7. Colorado: -435
8. California: -364——————-8. Knox: -418———————-8. California: -391
9. Florida: -360———————-9. North Carolina: -417———-9. Greene: -388
10. Wood: -351———————10. Wisconsin: -395————–10. South Carolina: -362
11. Richland: -344——————11. Athens: -336——————11. Marion: -329
12. Greene: -239——————–12. Minnesota: -308————-12. Hamilton: -312
13. West Virginia: -236————13. Utah: -290———————13. Logan: -306
14. Missouri: -219——————-14. Richland: -266—————14. Utah: -300
15. Crawford: -209——————15. Portage: -265—————–15. Wood: -282
16. Hardin: -179———————16. Kentucky: -257—————16. Scioto: -249
17. Noble: -177———————-17. Logan: -242——————-17. Seneca: -183
18. Muskingum: -175—————18. Pennsylvania: -242———18. Champaign: -174
19. Butler: -173———————-19. Tennessee: -200————19. Oregon: -158
20. Holmes: -163——————–20. Oregon: -187—————-20. New Mexico: -157
21. Marion: -138———————21. Wood: -166——————21. Meigs: -150
22. Portage: -134——————-22. Sandusky: -157————–22. Mississippi: -146
23. Ottawa: -131——————–23. Mississippi: -151————-23. Portage: -142
24. Sandusky: -124—————-24. Jefferson: -127—————24. Idaho: -137
25. Oregon: -120——————-25. Kansas: -98——————-25. Minnesota: -125
26. Indiana: -116——————-26. Delaware (state): -88——-26. North Dakota: -112
27. Idaho: -115———————27. Idaho: -74———————-27. Wisconsin: -111
28. Utah: -103———————- 28. Crawford: -73—————–28. Darke: -103
29. Fayette: -93———————29. Hardin: -68——————–29. Texas: -95
30. Kansas: -90———————30. Seneca: -66——————-30. Hardin: -87

Top 25 Largest Positive Swings Between 2006-2010 and 2011-2015
1. Texas: +1276
2. North Carolina: +982
3. Kentucky: +884
4. West Virginia: +575
5. Indiana: +502
6. Washington (state): +466
7. Knox: +436
8. Richland: +406
9. Butler: +395
10. Fayette: +383
11. Medina: +376
12. Alaska: +364
13. Michigan: +346
14. Alabama: +298
15. Clinton: +282
16. Erie: +263
17. New Hampshire: +261
18. Lawrence: +241
19. Cuyahoga: +240
20. Summit: +233
21. Wayne: +226
22. Crawford: +221
23. Muskingum: +211
24. Clermont: +198
25. Nevada: +197

Top 25 Largest Negative Swings Between 2006-2010 and 2011-2015
1. Florida: -973
2. Tennessee: -817
3. Hamilton: -795
4. Logan: -634
5. Colorado: -598
6. Scioto: -508
7. Highland: -491
8. Missouri: -484
9. Lorain: -463
10. Virginia: -437
11. Darke: -320
12. Mahoning: -314
13. Champaign: -310
14. Jefferson: -301
15. Maryland: -281
16. New Mexico: -261
17. Minnesota: -249
19. Coshocton: -233
20. Washington (county): -208
21. Ashland: -202
22. Utah: -197
23. Marion: -191
24. Seneca: -181
25. Iowa: -158

Total Counts By Period
Positive Ohio Counties

2006-2010: 53
2009-2013: 57
2011-2015: 50

Positive States, including DC and Puerto Rico
2006-2010: 21
2009-2013: 24
2011-2015: 28

Total Net In-Migration
Ohio

2006-2010: +8,008
2009-2013: +11,366
2011-2015: +7,895

Outside Ohio
2006-2010: -1,158
2009-2013: -466
2011-2015: +1,598

Ohio and Outside Ohio
2006-2010: +6,850
2009-2013: +10,900
2011-2015: +9,493

All these figures show that the Columbus metro has net positive domestic migration. While the majority of that comes from within the state, Columbus’ previously negative net total from outside the state has more recently become positive as well. For a long time, Columbus’ relative success was not well-known outside of the state, but perhaps word is finally getting out.

Columbus Area Murders by Zip Code 2008-2015



I have been wanting to do these maps for awhile now, as there have been several searches on the site for them and they weren’t available. It took a lot of work, but here they are!

2008

In 2008, almost all murders were contained within the I-270 boundaries. The East and South Sides were the worst areas.

2009

In 2009, there began to be a bit of diffusion on where murder was taking place. While parts of the urban core remained the worst areas, suburban areas also saw the occasional murder.

2010

The diffusion continued in 2010.

2011

And in 2011.

2012

2012 was the most diffuse of all the years, with no heavily concentrated areas, even in the urban core as much. Meanwhile, most of the suburban zip codes within Franklin County saw at least 1 murder.

2013

2014

2015

By 2015, most activity was on the eastern side of the city, particular South Linden and the Far East Side around Whitehall and Reynoldsburg, but all areas along the 270 area on the Far East Side had the highest levels of murder in the county. The central core generally stayed a lot lower, creating a much more prominent donut shape than what existed back in 2008.
This seems to indicate that as the central core gains in population and income, crime is also being pushed further out.



Young Professionals and the City: A Comparison Part 2



The first part of this comparison, seen here: seemed to be well-received, so I wanted to expand the examination of the 25-34 age group. In the first post, I just compared growth of this population by Columbus’ peers, but let’s take a closer look at this group through educational attainment. I will use the same 33 cities I used in the first post.

Educational Attainment 2014 Rank by City of Bachelors Degree or Higher within 25-34 Population
1. Chicago: 268,470
2. Austin: 97,721
3. Columbus: 75,305
4. San Jose: 68,392
5. Charlotte: 63,132
6. San Antonio: 62,572
7. Portland: 60,259
8. Minneapolis: 51,043
9. Indianapolis: 48,188
10. Pittsburgh: 35,860
11. Kansas City: 32,101
12. Madison: 30,039
13. Milwaukee: 29,661
14. Omaha: 28,984
15. St. Louis: 28,946
16. Sacramento: 27,304
17. Cincinnati: 25,496
18. St. Paul: 22,929
19. Virginia Beach: 22,134
20. Orlando: 20,181
21. Wichita: 19,659
22. Las Vegas: 17,817
23. Lincoln: 16,429
24. Grand Rapids: 15,724
25. Detroit: 14,285
26. Fort Wayne: 12,228
27. Cleveland: 12,013
28. Des Moines: 10,089
29. Providence: 10,432
30. Toledo: 8,514
31. Akron: 6,600
32. Dayton: 4,029
33. Youngstown: 1,084

Columbus has the 3rd highest total of 25-34 year olds with at least a bachelor’s degree, even compared to some cities with larger populations in the city or metro area. This is likely due to the high number of colleges and universities in the area, not least of which includes Ohio State.

2014 % of Total 25-34 Age Group with Bachelors or Higher
1. Madison: 67.0%
2. Pittsburgh: 57.4%
3. Minneapolis: 56.3%
4. Portland: 51.5%
5. Chicago: 51.1%
6. Austin: 48.9%
7. Cincinnati: 47.0%
8. St. Louis: 46.9%
9. Charlotte: 44.5%
10. San Jose: 44.5%
11. Columbus: 44.1%
12. St. Paul: 42.1%
13. Lincoln: 41.0%
14. Omaha: 40.8%
15. Grand Rapids: 40.5%
16. Kansas City: 40.5%
17. Orlando: 37.1%
18. Indianapolis: 34.3%
19. Wichita: 33.7%
20. Providence: 32.7%
21. Sacramento: 32.5%
22. Fort Wayne: 32.4%
23. Des Moines: 29.8%
24. Milwaukee: 29.6%
25. Virginia Beach: 29.3%
26. San Antonio: 27.6%
27. Akron: 23.4%
28. Cleveland: 21.4%
29. Las Vegas: 19.7%
30. Toledo: 19.5%
31. Dayton: 19.1%
32. Detroit: 15.9%
33. Youngstown: 12.8%

While just outside of the top 10 in the peer group, Columbus still performs in the top 1/3rd when it comes to the % of 25-34 year olds that have at least a bachelor’s degree.

2000-2014 Total Change in Age 25-34 with a Bachelor’s Degree or Higher
1. Chicago: +78,514
2. Austin: +38,348
3. Portland: +26,042
4. San Antonio: +23,504
5. Columbus: +21,601
6. Charlotte: +19,149
7. Pittsburgh: +19,060
8. Minneapolis: +15,629
9. St. Louis: +14,538
10. San Jose: +13,372
11. Sacramento: +11,530
12. Kansas City: +10,499
13. Madison: +8,774
14. Orlando: +8,600
15. Omaha: +8,521
16. Indianapolis: +8,369
17. Milwaukee: +7,031
18. Grand Rapids: +6,275
19. Wichita: +6,049
20. Fort Wayne: +5,350
21. Cincinnati: +5,083
22. Las Vegas: +4,433
23. St. Paul: +4,316
24. Virginia Beach: +4,167
25. Lincoln: +3,450
26. Providence: +2,488
27. Des Moines: +806
28. Dayton: +59
29. Youngstown: -108
30. Cleveland: -522
31. Akron: -628
32. Detroit: -1,471
33. Toledo: -1,639

Another great showing is in the total growth of 25-34 year olds with at least a bachelor’s degree. Again, Columbus is outperforming several larger cities/metros on the list.

2000-2014 Total % Change in Age 25-34 with a Bachelor’s Degree or Higher
1. Pittsburgh: +113.45%
2. St. Louis: +100.90%
3. Fort Wayne: +77.78%
4. Portland: +76.11%
5. Orlando: +74.26%
6. Sacramento: +73.09%
7. Grand Rapids: +66.41%
8. Austin: +64.59%
9. San Antonio: +60.16%
10. Kansas City: +48.60%
11. Wichita: +44.45%
12. Minneapolis: +44.13%
13. Charlotte: +43.54%
14. Omaha: +41.64%
15. Chicago: +41.33%
16. Madison: +41.26%
17. Columbus: +40.22%
18. Las Vegas: +33.12%
19. Providence: +31.32%
20. Milwaukee: +31.07%
21. Lincoln: +26.58%
22. Cincinnati: +24.90%
23. San Jose: +24.30%
24. St. Paul: +23.19%
25. Virginia Beach: +23.19%
26. Indianapolis: +21.02%
27. Des Moines: +8.68%
28. Dayton: +1.49%
29. Cleveland: -4.16%
30. Akron: -8.69%
31. Youngstown: -9.06%
32. Detroit: -9.34%
33. Toledo: -16.14%

So in Part 1, it was shown that Columbus had one of the fastest growing 25-34 populations. These numbers show that it also has one of the largest age 25-34 populations with a Bachelor’s degree or higher in terms of totals, and one of the fastest growing in terms of totals. By %, however, it performs a bit worse, but part of the reason for that is because so many of these cities started with relatively low educated populations to begin with. Overall, Columbus seems to be very attractive, not only to this age group, but also for those within the group that are highly educated.



2014 State GDP



New state-level GDP figures were recently released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. Where does Ohio stand?

First, let’s look at the top 20 states for total GDP in 2014

2014 Total, in Millions
1. California: 2,311,616
2. Texas: 1,648,036
3. New York: 1,404,518
4. Florida: 839,944
5. Illinois: 745,875
6. Pennsylvania: 662,890
7. Ohio: 583,261
8. New Jersey: 549,099
9. North Carolina: 483,126
10. Georgia: 476,483
11. Virginia: 463,613
12. Massachusetts: 459,937
13. Michigan: 451,516
14. Washington: 427,052
15. Maryland: 348,631
16. Indiana: 317,840
17. Minnesota: 316,204
18. Colorado: 306,663
19. Tennessee: 300,604
20. Wisconsin: 292,891

Ohio maintained its 7th-place position through 2014.
Now let’s look at the 20 states that had the biggest increases.

Total GDP Growth in Millions 2013-2014
1. California: +98,625
2. Texas: +90,843
3. New York: +62,927
4. Florida: +39,247
5. Pennsylvania: +22,596
6. Illinois: +21,080
7. Ohio: +20,416
8. Georgia: +20,000
9. Washington: +19,892
10. Massachusetts: +18,470
11. Colorado: +18,325
12. Michigan: +16,842
13. North Carolina: +16,051
14. New Jersey: +11,703
15. Oregon: +10,810
16. Tennessee: +10,479
17. Arizona: +9,422
18. Maryland: +9,222
19. Minnesota: +8,934
20. Virginia: +8,629

So Ohio is growing at the same position as its overall ranking. No states below it are set to pass it anytime in the near future. In fact, the gap is widening from its nearest threats.

What about per-capita GDP, which is a measure of the state’s total GDP divided by its population?

Per-Capita GDP, in Dollars 2014
1. Alaska: 66,160
2. North Dakota: 65,225
3. New York: 64,818
4. Connecticut: 64,676
5. Wyoming: 64,309
6. Massachusetts: 63,005
7. Delaware: 60,551
8. New Jersey: 56,405
9. Washington: 55,298
10. California: 54,462
11. Texas: 54,433
12. Maryland: 53,759
13. Illinois: 52,827
14. Minnesota: 52,801
15. Nebraska: 52,724
16. Colorado: 52,214
17. Virginia: 51,338
18. Oregon: 51,329
19. New Hampshire: 49,951
20. Hawaii: 49,686

27. Ohio: 45,887

Ohio is in the bottom half. Not great, as it indicates that it’s actually underperforming in GDP given its population.

So there you have it, a quick 2014 GDP update. To find out more, check out the BEA site at http://www.bea.gov/index.htm It has tons of economic information for states and metro areas.

2014 Metro Area Population Estimates



Along with county estimates, metropolitan areas were also released.

Here is where Columbus stands along with all peers in the 1.5-2.5 million range, along with the Midwest’s largest.

Metro Area Population Ranking, Census 2010, July 1, 2013 and July 1, 2014
2010 2013 2014
1. Chicago, IL: 9,461,105 ——–1. Chicago: 9,544,796———–1. Chicago, IL: 9,554,598
2. Detroit, MI: 4,296,250———-2. Detroit, MI: 4,295,394——-2. Detroit, MI: 4,296,611
3. Minneapolis, MN: 3,348,859–3. Minneapolis: 3,461,434—3. Minneapolis: 3,495,176
4. St. Louis, MO: 2,787,701——4. St. Louis: 2,801,587——-4. St. Louis, MO: 2,806,207
5. Pittsburgh, PA: 2,356,285—–5. Pittsburgh: 2,360,565—–5. Charlotte, NC: 2,380,314
6. Portland, OR: 2,226,009—–6. Charlotte, NC: 2,337,339–6. Pittsburgh, PA: 2,355,968
7. Charlotte, NC: 2,217,012—-7. Portland, OR: 2,314,747—7. Portland, OR: 2,348,247
8. Sacramento, CA: 2,149,127-8. San Antonio: 2,282,201—8. San Antonio: 2,328,652
9. San Antonio, TX: 2,142,508-9. Orlando, FL: 2,271,083—-9. Orlando, FL: 2,321,418
10. Orlando, FL: 2,134,411-10. Sacramento: 2,217,515-10. Sacramento, CA: 2,244,397
11. Cincinnati: 2,114,580—11. Cincinnati: 2,138,536——–11. Cincinnati: 2,149,449
12. Cleveland: 2,077,240—-12. Cleveland: 2,065,328—12. Kansas City, MO: 2,071,133
13. Kansas City: 2,009,342–13. Kansas City: 2,055,351–13. Las Vegas, NV: 2,069,681
14. Las Vegas: 1,951,269–14. Las Vegas, NV: 2,029,316—14. Cleveland: 2,063,598
15. Columbus: 1,901,974—-15. Columbus: 1,969,032——-15. Columbus: 1,994,536
16. Indianapolis, IN: 1,887,877–16. Indianapolis: 1,953,146–16. Indianapolis: 1,971,274
17. San Jose, CA: 1,836,911–17. San Jose, CA: 1,928,701–17. San Jose: 1,952,872
18. Austin, TX: 1,716,289—–18. Austin, TX: 1,885,803——18. Austin, TX: 1,943,299
19. Virginia Beach: 1,676,822–19. Nashville, TN: 1,758,577–19. Nashville: 1,792,649
20. Nashville: 1,670,890–20. Virginia Beach: 1,707,385–20. Virginia Beach: 1,716,624
21. Providence, RI: 1,600,852–21. Providence: 1,605,521–21. Providence: 1,609,367
22. Milwaukee, WI: 1,555,908–22. Milwaukee: 1,570,167—22. Milwaukee: 1,572,245
23. Grand Rapids: 988,938-23. Grand Rapids: 1,017,247-23. Grand Rapids: 1,027,703
24. Omaha, NE: 865,350—-24. Omaha, NE: 895,573——24. Omaha, NE: 904,421
25. Dayton: 799,232———-25. Dayton: 801,645————-25. Dayton: 800,836
26. Akron: 703,200———–26. Akron: 703,210—————26. Akron: 703,825
27. Wichita, KS: 630,919—-27. Wichita, KS: 638,259——27. Wichita, KS: 641,076
28. Toledo: 610,001———-28. Madison, WI: 627,466—–28. Madison, WI: 633,787
29. Madison, WI: 605,435–29. Toledo, OH: 608,430——29. Des Moines, IA: 611,549
30. Des Moines, IA: 569,633–30. Des Moines, IA: 600,086–30. Toledo, OH: 607,456
31. Youngstown: 565,773–31. Youngstown: 556,129—–31. Youngstown: 553,263

Total Births Census 2010 to July 1, 2014
Chicago, IL: 516,295
Detroit, MI: 212,571
Minneapolis, MN: 192,866
Charlotte, NC: 125,143
Kansas City, MO: 117,872
Portland, OR: 117,482
Cincinnati: 117,072
Sacramento, CA: 116,893
Orlando, FL: 114,387
Columbus: 113,392
Indianapolis, IN: 113,127
Las Vegas, NV: 111,857
Austin, TX: 107,591
San Jose, CA: 105,447
Pittsburgh, PA: 100,888
Cleveland: 98,504
Virginia Beach, VA: 96,734
Nashville, TN: 96,440
Milwaukee, WI: 84,990
Providence, RI: 70,850
Grand Rapids, MI: 57,551
Omaha, NE: 55,860
Dayton: 40,683
Wichita, KS: 40,276
Des Moines, IA: 36,423
Akron: 32,228
Toledo: 32,024
Madison, WI: 31,280
Youngstown: 23,686

Total Deaths Census 2010 to July 1, 2014
Chicago, IL: 289,440
Detroit, MI: 166,387
Pittsburgh, PA: 114,531
Minneapolis, MN: 90,773
Cleveland: 88,446
Cincinnati: 77,345
Charlotte, NC: 71,315
Kansas City, MO: 68,102
Sacramento, CA: 67,943
Portland, OR: 67,820
Orlando, FL: 65,979
Indianapolis, IN: 64,207
Columbus: 62,011
Providence, RI: 61,604
Las Vegas, NV: 60,256
Nashville, TN: 55,846
Virginia Beach, VA: 55,425
Milwaukee, WI: 55,123
San Jose, CA: 41,927
Austin, TX: 36,873
Dayton: 33,636
Grand Rapids, MI: 30,324
Youngstown: 29,196
Akron: 29,040
Omaha, NE: 26,829
Toledo: 24,226
Wichita, KS: 23,025
Des Moines, IA: 17,602
Madison, WI: 17,069

Total Natural Change Census 2010 to July 1, 2014
Chicago, IL: 226,855
Minneapolis, MN: 102,093
Austin, TX: 70,718
San Jose, CA: 63,520
Charlotte, NC: 53,828
Las Vegas, NV: 51,601
Columbus: 51,381
Kansas City, MO: 49,770
Portland, OR: 49,662
Sacramento, CA: 48,950
Indianapolis, IN: 48,920
Orlando, FL: 48,708
Detroit, MI: 46,184
Virginia Beach, VA: 41,309
Nashville, TN: 40,594
Cincinnati: 39,727
Milwaukee, WI: 29,867
Omaha, NE: 29,031
Grand Rapids, MI: 27,227
Des Moines, IA: 18,821
Wichita, KS: 17,251
Madison, WI: 14,211
Cleveland: 10,058
Providence, RI: 9,246
Toledo: 7,798
Dayton: 7,047
Akron: 3,188
Youngstown: -5,510
Pittsburgh, PA: -13,643

Total Domestic Migration Census 2010 to July 1, 2014
Austin, TX: 126,296
Charlotte, NC: 83,305
Orlando, FL: 72,735
Nashville, TN: 63,477
Portland, OR: 48,793
Las Vegas, NV: 35,289
Columbus: 20,083
Indianapolis, IN: 16,744
Des Moines, IA: 16,559
Sacramento, CA: 15,658
Madison, WI: 6,901
Grand Rapids, MI: 5,372
Pittsburgh, PA: 4,053
Omaha, NE: 2,869
Minneapolis, MN: -934
Kansas City, MO: -1,948
Akron: -6,490
Youngstown: -7,347
Dayton: -10,873
Wichita, KS: -11,148
Toledo: -13,337
San Jose, CA: -15,335
Cincinnati: -18,334
Providence, RI: -21,325
Milwaukee, WI: -22,597
Virginia Beach, VA: -24,374
Cleveland: -38,424
Detroit, MI: -89,649
Chicago, IL: -237,666

Total International Migration Census 2010 to July 1, 2014
Chicago, IL: 108,320
San Jose, CA: 69,894
Orlando, FL: 63,215
Minneapolis, MN: 46,328
Detroit, MI: 44,614
Las Vegas, NV: 29,440
Sacramento, CA: 29,435
Austin, TX: 25,762
Charlotte, NC: 23,114
Virginia Beach, VA: 23,092
Portland, OR: 22,042
Columbus: 21,574
Providence, RI: 21,170
Indianapolis, IN: 17,623
Nashville, TN: 16,204
Cleveland: 16,010
Kansas City, MO: 14,569
Cincinnati: 14,567
Pittsburgh, PA: 12,887
Milwaukee, WI: 9,968
Omaha, NE: 7,897
Madison, WI: 6,706
Grand Rapids, MI: 6,232
Dayton: 6,200
Des Moines, IA: 6,159
Akron: 4,599
Wichita, KS: 4,006
Toledo: 2,971
Youngstown: 1,088

Total Migration Census 2010 to July 1, 2014
Austin, TX: 152,058
Orlando, FL: 135,950
Charlotte, NC: 106,419
Nashville, TN: 79,681
Portland, OR: 70,835
Las Vegas, NV: 64,729
San Jose, CA: 54,559
Minneapolis, MN: 45,394
Sacramento, CA: 45,093
Columbus: 41,657
Indianapolis, IN: 34,367
Des Moines, IA: 22,718
Pittsburgh, PA: 16,940
Madison, WI: 13,607
Kansas City, MO: 12,621
Grand Rapids, MI: 11,604
Omaha, NE: 10,766
Providence, RI: -155
Virginia Beach, VA: -1,282
Akron: -1,891
Cincinnati: -3,767
Dayton: -4,673
Youngstown: -6,259
Wichita, KS: -7,142
Toledo: -10,366
Milwaukee, WI: -12,629
Cleveland: -22,414
Detroit, MI: -45,035
Chicago, IL: -129,346

Total Population Change Census 2010 to July 1, 2014
Austin, TX: 226,996
Orlando, FL: 187,012
Charlotte, NC: 163,066
Minneapolis, MN: 146,319
Portland, OR: 122,236
Nashville, TN: 121,749
Las Vegas, NV: 118,412
San Jose, CA: 115,931
Sacramento, CA: 95,254
Chicago, IL: 93,061
Columbus: 92,521
Indianapolis, IN: 83,192
Kansas City, MO: 61,795
Des Moines, IA: 41,916
Virginia Beach, VA: 39,807
Omaha, NE: 39,071
Grand Rapids, MI: 38,763
Cincinnati: 34,694
Madison, WI: 28,350
Milwaukee, WI: 16,291
Wichita, KS: 10,157
Providence, RI: 8,151
Dayton: 1,620
Akron: 618
Detroit, MI: 298
Pittsburgh, PA: -317
Toledo: -2,545
Youngstown: -12,541
Cleveland: -13,648

Out of the 31 peer and Midwest metros, Columbus had the 7th highest natural growth, the 10th highest migration rate and the 11th highest overall growth rate.



2014 Ohio County Population Estimates



New county population estimates were released Thursday. Franklin County had its 2nd highest growth year since 1970 and within a few years of passing Cuyahoga County to become the most populated in Ohio.

Top 25 Largest Ohio Counties and Rank for Census 2010, July 1, 2013 and July 1, 2014
2010 2013 2014

1. Cuyahoga: 1,280,122–1. Cuyahoga: 1,265,889–1. Cuyahoga: 1,259,828
2. Franklin: 1,163,414—–2. Franklin: 1,213,834——2. Franklin: 1,231,393
3. Hamilton: 802,374——3. Hamilton: 804,429——-3. Hamilton: 806,631
4. Summit: 541,781——–4. Summit: 541,787———4. Summit: 541,943
5. Montgomery: 535,153–5. Montgomery: 534,764–5. Montgomery: 533,116
6. Lucas: 441,815———-6. Lucas: 436,803———–6. Lucas: 435,286
7. Stark: 375,586———–7. Stark: 375,222————7. Stark: 375,736
8. Butler: 368,130———-8. Butler: 371,511————8. Butler: 374,158
9. Lorain: 301,356———-9. Lorain: 303,306———–9. Lorain: 304,216
10. Mahoning: 238,823—10. Mahoning: 234,336—-10. Mahoning: 233,204
11. Lake: 230,041———-11. Lake: 229,634———–11. Lake: 229,230
12. Warren: 212,693——-12. Warren: 219,578——-12. Warren: 221,659
13. Trumbull: 210,312—–13. Trumbull: 206,480——13. Trumbull: 205,175
14. Clermont: 197,363—–14. Clermont: 200,254—–14. Clermont: 201,560
15. Delaware: 174,214—-15. Delaware: 185,202—–15. Delaware: 189,113
16. Medina: 172,332——-16. Medina: 174,792——–16. Medina: 176,029
17. Licking: 166,492——–17. Licking: 168,503——–17. Licking: 169,390
18. Greene: 161,573——-18. Greene: 163,465——–18. Greene: 163,820
19. Portage: 161,419——-19. Portage: 161,423——-19. Portage: 161,882
20. Fairfield: 146,156——-20. Fairfield: 148,797——-20. Fairfield: 150,381
21. Clark: 138,333———-21. Clark: 136,803———–21. Clark: 136,554
22. Wood: 125,488———22. Wood: 129,209———-22. Wood: 129,590
23. Richland: 124,475—–23. Richland: 122,292——23. Richland: 121,942
24. Wayne: 114,520——-24. Wayne: 115,144———24. Wayne: 115,537
25. Columbiana: 107,841–25. Columbiana: 105,885–25. Columbiana: 105,686

Top 25 Counties with the Largest Numerical Growth, July 1, 2013 to July 1, 2014
1. Franklin: +17,559
2. Delaware: +3,911
3. Butler: +2,647
4. Hamilton: +2,202
5. Warren: +2,081
6. Fairfield: +1,584
7. Clermont: +1,306
8. Lorain: +1,210
9. Licking: +887
10. Madison: +646
11. Stark: +514
12. Miami: +484
13. Portage: +459
14. Pickaway: +410
15. Union: +396
16. Wayne: +393
17. Wood: +381
18. Greene: +355
19. Knox: +244
20. Holmes: +236
21. Geauga: +236
22. Athens: +198
23. Fulton: +162
24. Summit: +156
25. Muskingum: +122

Top 25 Counties with the Largest Numerical Growth, Census 2010 to July 1, 2014
1. Franklin: +67,850
2. Delaware: +14,924
3. Warren: +8,791
4. Butler: +6,028
5. Hamilton: +4,257
6. Fairfield: +4,229
7. Clermont: +4,197
8. Wood: +4,102
9. Medina: +3,696
10. Licking: +2,906
11. Lorain: +2,860
12. Greene: +2,251
13. Holmes: +1,532
14. Union: +1,509
15. Miami: +1,394
16. Pickaway: +1,178
17. Wayne: +1,023
18. Geauga: +885
19. Hancock: +555
20. Madison: +488
21. Portage: +461
22. Morrow: +325
23. Knox: +237
24. Tuscarawas: +206
25. Summit: +157

Top 25 Counties for Total Birth July 1, 2013 to July 1, 2014
1. Franklin: 18,595
2. Cuyahoga: 14,801
3. Hamilton: 11,009
4. Montgomery: 6,708
5. Summit: 6,235
6. Lucas: 5,742
7. Butler: 4,572
8. Stark: 4,106
9. Lorain: 3,340
10. Warren: 2,396
11. Mahoning: 2,369
12. Clermont: 2,357
13. Lake: 2,204
14. Delaware: 2,119
15. Trumbull: 2,070
16. Licking: 1,948
17. Greene: 1,757
18. Medina: 1,732
19. Fairfield: 1,647
20. Clark: 1,567
21. Wayne: 1,501
22. Richland: 1,413
23. Wood: 1,370
24. Portage: 1,369
25. Allen: 1,288

Top 25 Counties for Total Deaths July 1, 2013 to July 1, 2014
1. Cuyahoga: 13,316
2. Franklin: 9,197
3. Hamilton: 7,718
4. Montgomery: 5,632
5. Summit: 5,595
6. Lucas: 4,365
7. Stark: 3,910
8. Butler: 3,186
9. Mahoning: 2,957
10. Trumbull: 2,407
11. Lake: 2,366
12. Warren: 1,636
13. Clark: 1,631
14. Clermont: 1,574
15. Licking: 1,505
16. Medina: 1,352
17. Greene: 1,350
18. Portage: 1,329
19. Richland: 1,313
20. Fairfield: 1,233
21. Columbiana: 1,140
22. Ashtabula: 1,092
23. Allen: 1,063
24. Wayne: 1,055
25. Delaware: 1,019

Top 25 Counties for Total Natural Change (Births vs. Deaths) July 1, 2013 to July 1, 2014
1. Franklin: 9,398
2. Hamilton: 3,291
3. Cuyahoga: 1,481
4. Lucas: 1,377
5. Butler: 1,386
6. Delaware: 1,100
7. Montgomery: 1,076
8. Clermont: 783
9. Warren: 760
10. Summit: 640
11. Lorain: 546
12. Holmes: 506
13. Wayne: 446
14. Licking: 443
15. Fairfield: 414
16. Greene: 407
17. Medina: 380
18. Wood: 359
19. Union: 271
20. Hancock: 249
21. Allen: 225
22. Shelby: 212
23. Geauga: 199
24. Stark: 196
25. Huron: 165



Cool Link of the Day: Mapping Commuting Patterns



Curious to know how people get to work in every county in the United States? Use the following link to find out.
http://flowingdata.com/2015/01/20/how-americans-get-to-work/

The map was constructed using 2013 data, so it’s fairly recent. As for Franklin County? Here’s the breakdown:
Drive Alone: 82%
Carpool: 8%
Public Transit: 2%
Walk: 2%
Bicycle: 1%
Taxi or Other: 1%
Work from Home: 4%

The numbers are overwhelmingly auto-centric, as they are nearly everywhere, but what the numbers don’t show are any trends.

2013 Census Tract Estimates



The Census released updated tract estimates for 2013, and they showed some interesting things. There are 285 census tracts that make up Franklin County.

First, let’s take a look at the Franklin County trends 2000-2013.

In regards to the above map, it’s a mix of both the 2013 official estimates and some that I did. For example, the official estimates had the Downtown tracts 30 and 40 losing population, as well as most of the Short North. That’s rather absurd considering the level of residential construction in these areas, as well as population estimates the city has done in the last few years for Downtown. In fact, the 2013 official estimates have Downtown tract population BELOW 2010. That’s just not the reality. So I looked over the tracts and adjusted them according to their long-term growth/decline trends. Most of them I left alone, but some adjustments had to be made. However, I was very conservative with any changes, and several tracts that the official estimates showed gains, I actually had losses.

Here are all the tracts that grew by at least 300 people between 2010 and 2013 in Franklin County, as well as their locations.
Blacklick #7395: +1,609
Dublin #6230: +1,214
Columbus-West Side #7951: +1,002
Columbus-Northwest #6372: +966
Columbus Northeast #6931: +963
Hilliard #7921: +955
Columbus-East Side #9361: +952
Columbus-West Side #8350: +951
Columbus-Northwest: #6384: +949
Dublin #6220: +933
Columbus-West Side #8141: +921
Columbus-Easton #7551: +793
Columbus-Southeast #9373: +749
Hilliard #7933: +688
Minerva Park #7112: +675
Columbus-South Side #8340: +652
Hilliard #7954: +643
Columbus North Side #7044: +636
Columbus Northeast #7132: +615
Columbus Northwest #6396: +557
Dublin #6386: +549
Columbus North Side #6921: +540
Columbus Northwest #6393: +492
Columbus-West Side: +489
Gahanna #7492: +473
New Albany #7209: +472
Columbus-Hilltop #8321: +466
Columbus-Southeast #9374: +455
Grove City #9740: +441
Columbus Northeast #6945: +438
Hillard #7931: +432
Columbus-West Side #7812: +427
Columbus-South Side #9590: +411
Columbus-South Side #8710: +407
Hilliard #10602: +407
Columbus-South Side #8822: +403
Whitehall #9230: +398
Columbus-West Side #8163: +397
Columbus-East Side #9362: +389
Columbus-Downtown #30: +387
Hilliard #7953: +382
Columbus-West Side #6330: +371
Columbus-Northwest #6387: +361
Columbus-East Side #9322: +352
Columbus-South Side #8825: +349
Columbus-Southwest #8161: +346
West Side-Marble Cliff #43: +345
Columbus-Southwest #8370: +340
Grandview #85: +332
Columbus-Downtown #40: +321
Hilliard #7922: +320
Dublin #6371: +312
Grove City #9751: +304
Columbus-Campus Area #13: +303

As far as the core of the city, the 1950 boundaries, here are the results.

There are 78 tracts that make up the original 1950 city boundary. Using the official estimates, 38 of the 78 tracts grew between 2010-2013, yet had a total loss of 3,229. However, again, it had all the Downtown and adjacent tracts inexplicably losing population, yet the opposite is occurring in these areas. For Downtown, the combined loss was about 370, and for the Short North, it had the loss at more than 700.

Using my adjusted estimates, 35 tracts are growing, adding 1,166 people 2010-2013. Most of the gains were made in the Downtown and adjacent tracts, and some of the losses were simply not as steep. For example, the official estimates had tract #10, in the Campus area, losing nearly 1,300 people since 2010, which is a ridiculous loss, especially considering it grew by almost 8% 2000-2010. In fact, most of the largest losses from the official estimates were around Campus and the Short North. Nonsense.

Columbus Housing Market Update- August 2014



For this update, I’m going to do things a bit differently. In previous updates, I have done long ranking lists and it got to be a bit overwhelming. So starting with this update, I’m going to do more charts instead.

In any case, August continued the year-long trend of home sales being down, with the month coming in at more than 11% off from the same time last year. Prices, however, were up more than 6% to reach a monthly record. There continues to be a supply problem, which is the main mechanism driving both lower sales and higher prices.

Now on to the charts!