2019 Ohio City Population Estimates



The Census has just released estimates for cities, towns and villages for July 1, 2019.

Ohio Top 30 Largest Cities by Rank
Census 2010————————————–July 1, 2019
1. Columbus: 787,033————————1. Columbus: 898,553
2. Cleveland: 396,815————————2. Cleveland: 381,009
3. Cincinnati: 296,943——————-—–3. Cincinnati: 303,940
4. Toledo: 287,208———————-——4. Toledo: 272,779
5. Akron: 199,110————————-—–5. Akron: 197,597
6. Dayton: 141,527—————————-6. Dayton: 140,407
7. Parma: 81,601—————————––7. Parma: 78,103
8. Canton: 73,007———————–——-8. Canton: 70,447
9. Youngstown: 66,982————————9. Youngstown: 65,469
10. Lorain: 64,097——————–———10. Lorain: 63,855
11. Hamilton: 62,477——————–——11. Hamilton: 62,082
12. Springfield: 60,608————————12. Springfield: 58,877
13. Kettering: 56,163————————-–13. Kettering: 54,855
14. Elyria: 54,533—————————-—14. Elyria: 53,757
15. Lakewood: 52,131———————––15. Newark: 50,315
16. Cuyahoga Falls: 49,652——————16. Lakewood: 49,678
17. Euclid: 48,920————————–—–17. Cuyahoga Falls: 49,106
18. Middletown: 48,694————————18. Dublin: 49,037
19. Mansfield: 47,821———————-—–19. Middletown: 48,807
20. Newark: 47,573————————–—-20. Beavercreek: 47,741
21. Mentor: 47,159—————————––21. Mentor: 47,262
22. Cleveland Heights: 46,121—————-22. Mansfield: 46,599
23. Beavercreek: 45,193——————–—-23. Euclid: 46,550
24. Strongsville: 44,750————————–24. Strongsville: 44,660
25. Fairfield: 42,510——————————25. Cleveland Heights: 43,992
26. Dublin: 41,751———————————26. Fairfield: 42,558
27. Warren: 41,557—————————-—-27. Grove City: 41,820
28. Findlay 41,202—————————–—-28. Delaware: 41,283
29. Lancaster: 38,780—————————–29. Findlay: 41,225
30. Lima: 38,771———————————–30. Westerville: 41,103

In 2010, 4 Columbus Metro communities were in the top 30.  By last year, 6 were, with more poised to enter the list in the coming years.

Top 30 Ohio Cities with the Highest Total Growth Census 2010 to July 1, 2019
1. Columbus: +111,520
2. Hilliard: +8,099
3. Dublin: +7,286
4. Cincinnati: +6,997
5. Delaware: +6,530
6. Grove City: +6,245
7. Westerville: +4,983
8. North Ridgeville: +4,927
9. Pickerington: +3,867
10. New Albany: +3,209
11. Mason: +3,158
12. Newark: +2,742
13. Marysville: +2,573
14. Beavercreek: +2,548
15. Wadsworth: +2,479
16. Reynoldsburg: +2,434
17. Gahanna: +2,235
18. Avon: +2,206
19. Harrison: +1,999
20. Sunbury: +1,978
21. Avon Lake: +1,923
22. Powell: +1,875
23. Grandview Heights: +1,797
24. Oxford: +1,739
25. Lancaster: +1,725
26. Canal Winchester: +1,717
27. Upper Arlington: +1,595
28. Monroe: +1,573
29. Fairborn: +1,524
30. Springboro: +1,522

The Columbus Metro had 18 of the top 10, including 8 of the top 10.

Top 30 Ohio Cites with the Highest Total Growth July 1, 2018 to July 1, 2019
1. Columbus: +7,684
2. Cincinnati: +1,663
3. Delaware: +1,356
4. Pickerington: +932
5. Westerville: +771
6. Youngstown: +609
7. North Ridgeville: +580
8. Sunbury: +483
9. Marysville: +471
10. Dublin: +443
11. Beavercreek: +415
12. Warren: +381
13. Newark: +314
14. Wadsworth: +291
15. Mason: +290
16. Harrison: +274
17. Grove City: +247
18. Oxford: +239
19. Miamisburg: +231
20. Troy: +229
21. Canal Winchester: +220
22. Xenia: +219
23. Cedarville: +209
24. Hilliard: +201
25. Fairborn: +182
26. Piqua: +182
27. Avon: +170
28. Plain City: +168
29. Aurora: +157
30. Springboro: +157

2018 to 2019, Columbus had 12 cities in the top 30. This is not necessarily indicating a slowdown in growth within the metro. The final year before a decennial census, population estimates tend to be used for final adjustments. This means that if a city is thought to have been estimated too high or too low through the decade, the final estimate year is adjusted accordingly and not necessarily according to true growth. The point of estimates is to get a snapshot of the population at the time of the estimate, but they are constantly being changed every time a new estimate comes out. This usually leaves the final estimate year as showing the slowest growth. This was true for 2008-2009 as well.

Finally, here is every Columbus Metro community ranked and the population change 2010-2019.
1. Columbus: 898,533 +111,520
2. Newark: 50,315 +2,742
3. Dublin: 49,037 +7,286
4. Grove City: 41,820 +6,245
5. Delaware: 41,283 +6,530
6. Westerville: 41,103 +4,983
7. Lancaster: 40,505 +1,725
8. Reynoldsburg: 38,327 +2,434
9. Hilliard: 36,534 +8,099
10. Gahanna: 35,483 +2,235
11. Upper Arlington: 35,366 +1,595
12. Marysville: 24,667 +2,573
13. Pickerington: 22,158 +3,867
14. Whitehall: 18,926 +864
15. Pataskala: 15,883 +921
16. Worthington: 14,692 +1,117
17. Circleville: 14,050 +736
18. Bexley: 13,770 +713
19. Powell: 13,375 +1,875
20. New Albany: 10,933 +3,209
21. Heath: 10,942 +632
22. London: 10,328 +424
23. Canal Winchester: 8,818 +1,717
24. Grandview Heights: 8,333 +1,797
25. Logan: 7,020 -132
26. Sunbury: 6,367 +1,978
27. Granville: 5,916 +270
28. Groveport: 5,621 +258
29. Obetz: 5,196 +664
30. Johnstown: 5,098 +466
31. New Lexington: 4,671 -60
32. Plain City: 4,586 +361
33. West Jefferson: 4,431 +209
34. Ashville: 4,385 +288
35. Baltimore: 3,004 +38
36. Buckeye Lake: 2,871 +125
37. Crooksville: 2,482 -52
38. Richwood: 2,480 +251
39. Hebron: 2,477 +141
40. Utica: 2,260 +128
41. Cardington: 2,071 +24
42. South Bloomfield: 1,979 +235
43. Roseville: 1,839 -13
44. Lithopolis: 1,796 +690
45. Mount Sterling: 1,793 +11
46. Commercial Point: 1,679 +97
47. Ashley: 1,608 +278
48. Somerset: 1,455 -26
49. Bremen: 1,452 +27
50. Minerva Park: 1,321 +49
51. Hanover: 1,204 +283
52. Millersport: 1,074 +30
53. Williamsport: 1,074 +51
54. Thornville: 1,008 +17
55. Urbancrest: 993 +33
56. Pleasantville: 959 -1
57. Milford Center: 902 +110
58. New Holland: 851 +50
59. Shawnee Hills: 820 +139
60. Junction City: 805 -14
61. Ostrander: 749 +106
62. Galena: 742 +89
63. Amanda: 738 +1
64. Marble Cliff: 732 +159
65. New Straitsville: 710 -12
66. Shawnee: 642 -13
67. Valleyview: 638 +18
68. Thurston: 604 +0
69. Corning: 568 -15
70. Buchtel: 567 +9
71. Carroll: 566 +42
72. Riverlea: 565 +20
73. Stoutsvlle: 565: +5
74. Kirkersville: 552 +27
75. Alexandria: 542 +25
76. Laurelville: 503 -24
77. Edison: 443 +6
78. Murray City: 435 -14
79. Sugar Grove: 426 +0
80. Hartford: 410 +13
81. St. Louisville: 386 +13
82. South Solon: 364 +9
83. Harrisburg: 341 +21
84. Marengo: 341 -1
85. Midway: 328 +1
86. Rushville: 309 +7
87. Magnetic Springs: 298 +30
88. Tarlton: 290 +8
89. Orient: 277 -1
90. Fulton: 255 -3
91. Lockbourne: 249 +12
92. Chesterville: 232 +4
93. Darbyville: 229 +7
94. Unionville Center: 229 -4
95. Gratiot: 220 -1
96. Glenford: 169 -4
97. Sparta: 160 -1
98. Hemlock: 152 -3
99. West Rushville: 143 +9
100. Brice: 120 +6
101. Rendville: 36 +0



1962 Predictions of a Future Columbus and World

Back in 1962 on Columbus’ 150th anniversary, local politicians, educators and industry leaders were interviewed on what they thought the future might look like. The predictions were made for the year 2000, but even 20 years past that date, many of the predictions have proven wildly inaccurate… and a few that have surprisingly come true.

How Columbus was supposed to look in 1992.

Growth, Population and Demographics
Prediction: The city would have a population of 1.5 million in 2000 with 2.2 million in Franklin County.
Result: In 2000, the city had less than half the prediction, with just 711.5K and roughly 900K today. The county had 1.069 million in 2000 and 1.318 million today. Both are a far cry from the 1962 predictions, despite relatively strong growth since then, especially by Ohio standards.
Prediction: Columbus and Franklin County would be merged and operated under a single government.
Result: While there have been proposals for this going back to the 1930s, it has never happened and isn’t seriously under consideration today.

Infrastructure Predictions
Prediction: Downtown would have “grass-bordered pedestrian parks with auto traffic running underground”.
Prediction: Downtown’s streets would be multi-level, with elevated decks for pedestrians, and cars travelling on lower decks.
Result: There are currently no elevated or multi-level roadways. If anything, an increasing number of such structures are being torn down nationally.
Result: While several new parks have been created over the years in and around Downtown, the only significant tunnels built under the city have been for sewage and water.
Prediction: Renovation of the Scioto River levees in 1962 would allow for new recreation and parks along the river.
Result: Any infrastructure improvements along the river at the time made little impact on the overall use of the Scioto. It took another 50 years with the development of the Scioto Mile and the Scioto Greenways to significantly alter how Columbus residents interacted with the riverfront.
Prediction: Instead of walking, electronic sidewalks would move people around.
Result: Technically, these already existed at the time in the form of escalators, and while they haven’t proliferated around cities, people-moving sidewalks of a sort are now common at airports in long corridors.
Prediction: Cars would be under the control of cables buried under streets instead of drivers.
Result: While no cable system exists, autonomous vehicles are now a thing and Columbus has at least one autonomous shuttle currently operating in Linden.
Prediction: The Ohio Penitentiary would be replaced by an office complex.
Result: The Pen closed in the 1980s and was demolished in the late 1990s for the development of the Arena District. While there is some office space, the AD is a far greater development than envisioned in 1962.
Prediction: Union Station would be used as a transit hub for a monorail, bus and helicopter transit system.
Result: Union Station was torn down in 1976 to build the convention center after much controversy. There is currently no multi-modal transit hub in the city, despite numerous attempts to build one over the years. The city still only has a bus system.
Prediction: High-rise apartment buildings would go up along the edges of Downtown.
Result: Only a handful of legitimate high-rise apartment buildings have gone up since 1962 Downtown, including Miranova, North Bank Condos and Waterford Tower. A few more are in the works.
Prediction: Products and people would be shipped across the country by rocket ships.
Result: Rocket ships didn’t happen, but there are proposals for a super-fast system of transit. The closest example would be the Hyperloop, which is currently under testing and with which Columbus could one day be a beneficiary.
Prediction: Big Darby Creek would be dammed by at least 2 structures to provide water for the city and as flood control, with a new water purification plant built along its banks.
Result: Thankfully, this didn’t happen, as the Big Darby watershed is one of the most pristine in Ohio. Instead, it has been expanding as one of Columbus’ largest MetroPark.

Health and Safety
Prediction: Organ transplants would be possible and common, with many made of plastic.
Result: While organ transplants are indeed common now, they are largely just the flesh and blood type.
Prediction: “Irradiated” food would allow the “housewife’s chores” to be “revolutionized, preparing meals weeks in advance.
Result: This one, of course, didn’t happen and is an obvious example of the 1960s limited imagination of a what a woman’s role in society could be or would end up becoming.

Culture and Entertainment
Prediction: Instead of washing machines, people would use “sound waves” to clean clothing as it hung in home closets.
Result: Unfortunately, doing laundry the old-fashioned way is still in our present and future.
Prediction: Clothing would be made out of paper and be thrown away after single-use.
Result: I’m not even sure how this would be possible or practical.
Prediction: The use of “magnetically inscribed cards…read by electronic cash registers” would be used for purchases.
Result: Credit and debit cards are now just as popular, if not moreso, than paper money.
Prediction: Schools would operate year-round.
Result: While a year-round school year has been toyed with over the last 50 years, there are very few districts that have switched to it.
Prediction: Movies could be rented for personal use, and televsions could provide commercial free programs to individual households.
Result: Movie rentals did happen with the invention of the VCR and DVD player. The second part of the prediction is basically describing a streaming service like Netflix, which has killed the rental market.

Another imagined view of Columbus by 2000. Notice that only LeVeque Tower and the Statehouse remain recognizeable, showing obvious atttudes towards historic preservation at the time.

Out-There Predictions
Prediction: Columbus would have its first resident visit the moon.
Result: Ohio has seen several astronauts, a few of which did end up making it to the moon, but no Columbus residents to date have been there.
Prediction: People would be able to read minds with “electronic gadgets”.
Result: While no actual mind reading exists today, the study and understanding of human behavior, and therefore predictions of it, have come a long way.
Prediction: Interplanetary travel would be in its early years and “colonists” would be travelling regularly to Mars and Venus.
Result: There is some truth to this as there are plans to venture to Mars, as well as experimental technology in development that could allow us to travel to other stars planetary systems someday. And unmanned probes have been getting closeup looks at other planets for decades. However, no one is going to Venus, which we now know is an incredibly hostile place where no human could ever visit, let alone live.

Planners in the early 1960s were full of grand ideas, but they were definitely a product of the times. The city they imagined was full of the bright and shiny hope of the Space Age, with everything old and natural swept away for a Jetsons future. Technology has advanced in ways that they saw coming decades before it happened, but in many ways they never could have imagined. They didn’t imagine, however, the consequences of all that technology and highways and consumption and how we’re still cleaning up the mess of some of those mistakes. And making new ones along the way.

The future we face today maybe doesn’t have the same irrational, aspirational hope of the 1960s, but there is still hope. We face some of the gravest threats of our existance, with many of them of our own making, but we have the capacity and ability to solve them and to have a future every bit as bright as the one imagined almost 60 years ago. Perhaps in ways that we too could never have imagined.



2019 Metro Area Population Estimates

Here are the 2019 Census estimates and rankings for metro areas. This comparison ranks the following categories:
– All Ohio metros with at least 250,000 people.
– All Midwest metros with at least 500,000 people.
– All national metros with 1.5-2.5 million people.

Total Metro Area Population Census 2010, July 1, 2018 and July 1, 2019
Census 2010——————————-July 1, 2018————————July 1, 2019

1. Chicago, IL: 9,461,105————-1. Chicago: 9,484,158———–1. Chicago: 9,458,539
2. Detroit, MI: 4,296,250—————2. Detroit: 4,322,084————-2. Detroit: 4,319,629
3. Minneapolis, MN: 3,348,8459—-3. Minneapolis: 3,610,061–3. Minneapolis: 3,640,043
4. St. Louis, MO: 2,787,701———-4. St. Louis: 2,803,958———4. St. Louis: 2,803,228
5. Pittsburgh, PA: 2,356,285——5. San Antonio: 2,512,379—5. San Antonio: 2,550,960
6. San Juan, PR: 2,350,126———-6. Portland: 2,473,350———6. Portland: 2,492,412
7. Portland, OR: 2,226,009——-7. Sacramento: 2,341,940—–7. Sacramento: 2,363,730
8. Sacramento, CA: 2,149,127—–8. Pittsburgh: 2,322,653——–8. Pittsburgh: 2,317,600
9. San Antonio, TX: 2,142,516—–9. Las Vegas: 2,226,115——-9. Las Vegas: 2,266,715
10. Cincinnati: 2,114,580———–10. Cincinnati: 2,211,936——-10. Austin: 2,227,083
11. Cleveland: 2,077,240———–11. Austin: 2,165,497———–11. Cincinnati: 2,221,208
12. Kansas City, MO: 2,009,342-12. Kansas City: 2,144,427–12. Kanas City: 2,157,990
13. Las Vegas, NV: 1,951,269—–13. Columbus: 2,104,194—–13. Columbus: 2,122,271
14. Columbus: 1,901,974——-14. Cleveland: 2,053,795—–14. Indianapolis: 2,074,537
15. Indianapolis, IN: 1,887,877—15. Indianapolis: 2,052,368—15. Cleveland: 2,048,449
16. San Jose, CA: 1,836,911—16. San Juan: 2,022,139———16. San Juan: 2,023,227
17. Austin, TX: 1,716,289————17. San Jose: 1,993,804—–17. San Jose: 1,990,660
18. Virginia Beach, VA: 1,676,822—18. Nashville: 1,904,726—18. Nashville: 1,934,317
19. Nashville: 1,670,890—19. Virginia Beach: 1,763,713–19. Virginia Beach: 1,768,901
20. Providence, RI: 1,600,852—-20. Providence: 1,622,379—20. Providence: 1,624,578
21. Milwaukee, WI: 1,555,908—–21. Milwaukee: 1,573,995—21. Milwaukee: 1,575,179
22. Jacksonville, FL: 1,345,596-22. Jacksonville: 1,532,663–22. Jacksonville: 1,559,514
23. Grand Rapids: 988,938–23. Grand Rapids: 1,071,370-23. Grand Rapids: 1,077,370
24. Omaha, NE: 865,350————–24. Omaha: 940,970—-24. Omaha: 949,442
25. Dayton: 799,232——————–25. Dayton: 805,088—–25. Dayton: 807,611
26. Akron: 703,200———————26. Akron: 703,855——–26. Akron: 703,479
27. Wichita, KS: 630,919————27. Des Moines: 690,915—27. Des Moines: 699,292
28. Toledo: 610,001——————28.Madison: 659,927——–28. Madison: 664,865
29. Madison, WI: 605,435———–29. Toledo: 643,089——–29. Toledo: 641,816
30. Des Moines, IA: 569,633——-30. Wichita: 637,519——30. Wichita: 640,218
31. Youngstown: 565,773———–31. Lansing: 548,674—–31. Lansing: 550,391
32. Lansing, MI: 534,684————32. Youngstown: 538,226—32. Youngstown: 536,081
33. Canton: 404,422——————33. Canton: 401,165—-33. Canton: 399,927

Charlotte and Orlando, previous national peers, have grown past the population standards and are no longer used. Lansing and San Juan have been added.

Metro Area Total Growth Census 2010-July 1, 2019 and July 1, 2018-July 1, 2019
Census 2010-July 1, 2019—————————–July 1, 2018-July 1, 2019

1. Austin: +510,794————————————–1. Austin: +61,586
2. San Antonio: +408,452——————————2. Las Vegas: +40,600
3. Las Vegas: +315,446——————————–3. San Antonio: +38,581
4. Minneapolis: +306,410——————————4. Minneapolis: +29,982
5. Nashville: +288,117———————————-5. Nashville: +29,591
6. Portland: +266,403———————————–6. Jacksonville: +26,851
7. Columbus: +220,297——————————–7. Indianapolis: +22,169
8. Sacramento: +214,603——————————8. Sacramento: +21,790
9. Jacksonville: +213,918——————————9. Portland: +19,062
10. Indianapolis: +186,660—————————-10. Columbus: +18,077
11. San Jose: +153,749——————————–11. Kansas City: +13,563
12. Kansas City: +148,648—————————–12. Cincinnati: +9,272
13. Des Moines: +92,817——————————-13. Omaha: +8,472
14. Omaha: +84,092————————————-14. Des Moines: +8,377
15. Grand Rapids: +83,700—————————–15. Grand Rapids: +6,000
16. Cincinnati: +83,541———————————-16. Virginia Beach: +5,188
17. Madison: +59,430————————————17. Madison: +4,938
18. Virginia Beach: +54,947—————————-18. Wichita: +2,699
19. Providence: +23,726——————————–19. Dayton: +2,523
20. Detroit: +23,379—————————————20. Providence: +2,199
21. Milwaukee: +19,271———————————21. Lansing: +1,717
22. Wichita: +17,157————————————-22. Milwaukee: +1,184
23. Lansing: +15,707————————————23. San Juan: +1,088
24. St. Louis: +15,527———————————–24. Akron: -376
25. Dayton: +8,379—————————————25. St. Louis: -730
26. Akron: +279——————————————-26. Canton: -810
27. Chicago: -2,566————————————–27. Toledo: -1,273
28. Canton: -6,902—————————————28. Youngstown: -2,45
29. Toledo: -9,613—————————————-29. Detroit: -2,455
30. Cleveland: -28,791———————————-30. San Jose: -3,144
31. Youngstown: -29,692——————————-31. Pittsburgh: -5,053
32. Pittsburgh: -36,685———————————32. Cleveland: -5,346
33. San Juan: -326,899——————————–33. Chicago: -25,619

Now let’s look at the components of population change for metro areas.

Total Births By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2019 and July 1, 2018-July 1, 2019
Census 2010-July 1, 2019———————–July 1, 2018-July 1, 2019

1. Chicago: 1,085,985——————————-1. Chicago: 108,425
2. Detroit: 462,696————————————2. Detroit: 48,879
3. Minneapolis: 419,634—————————–3. Minneapolis: 44,602
4. St. Louis: 310,273———————————4. San Antonio: 32,592
5. San Antonio: 300,032—————————-5. St. Louis: 31,686
6. Kansas City: 253,384—————————-6. Columbus: 27,096
7. Cincinnati: 253,180——————————-7. Las Vegas: 27,048
8. Portland: 253,110———————————8. Cincinnati: 26,892
9. Sacramento: 252,144—————————9. Sacramento: 26,752
10. Columbus: 251,291—————————10. Kanas City: 26,497
11. Las Vegas: 247,787—————————11. Indianapolis: 26,300
12. Indianapolis: 246,099————————-12. Portland: 26,204
13. Austin: 239,673———————————13. Austin: 26,115
14. San Jose: 220,891—————————–14. Nashville: 24,308
15. Pittsburgh: 218,159—————————-15. Pittsburgh: 22,570
16. Nashville: 216,969—————————–16. San Jose: 22,487
17. Cleveland: 212,523—————————-17. Cleveland: 22,003
18. Virginia Beach: 209,617———————-18. Virginia Beach: 21,589
19. Milwaukee: 182,815—————————19. Milwaukee: 18,927
20. Jacksonville: 167,526————————-20. Jacksonville: 18,592
21. Providence: 152,794————————–21. Providence: 16,182
22. Grand Rapids: 125,556———————-22. Grand Rapids: 13,339
23. Omaha: 122,306——————————23. Omaha: 12,848
24. Dayton: 88,783——————————–24. Dayton: 9,391
25. Des Moines: 85,530————————–25. Des Moines: 9,311
26. Wichita: 81,503——————————–26. Wichita: 8,057
27. Toledo: 71,848———————————27. Toledo: 7,428
28. Akron: 69,159———————————-28. Akron: 7,196
29. Madison: 67,559——————————29. Madison: 6,988
30. Lansing: 54,679——————————-30. Lansing: 5,702
31. Youngstown: 51,745————————-31. Youngstown: 5,450
32. Canton: 40,730——————————–32. Canton: 4,254

Components of change stats are not available for San Juan.

Total Deaths By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2019 and July 1, 2018-July 1, 2019
Census 2010-July 1, 2019———————————July 1, 2018-July 1, 2019

1. Chicago: -647,739——————————————-1. Chicago: -74,501
2. Detroit: -377,943———————————————2. Detroit: -42,151
3. Pittsburgh: -253,686—————————————-3. St. Louis: -27,669
4. St. Louis: -241,884——————————————4. Pittsburgh: -27,387
5. Minneapolis: -210,510————————————-5. Minneapolis: -24,290
6. Cleveland: -198,044—————————————-6. Cleveland: -21,464
7. Cincinnati: -179,563—————————————-7. Cincinnati: -20,279
8. Sacramento: -157,234————————————-8. Sacramento: -18,933
9. Portland: -156,592——————————————9. San Antonio: -18,551
10. Kansas City: -155,166———————————–10. Portland: -18,458
11. San Antonio: -153,339———————————–11. Las Vegas: -17,919
12. Indianapolis: -148,608———————————–12. Kansas City: -17,692
13. Columbus: -142,665————————————–13. Columbus: -16,704
14. Las Vegas: -142,415————————————-14. Indianapolis: -16,678
15. Providence: -139,006————————————15. Virginia Beach: -15,280
16. Virginia Beach: -131,065——————————–16. Providence: -15,189
17. Nashville: -128,228—————————————17. Nashville: -15,122
18. Milwaukee: -123,806————————————-18. Jacksonville: -14,089
19. Jacksonville: -114,660———————————–19. Milwaukee: -13,810
20. San Jose: -94,587—————————————-20. San Jose: -11,582
21. Austin: -89,867——————————————–21. Austin: -11,445
22. Dayton: -77,893——————————————-22. Dayton: -8,506
23. Grand Rapids: -69,869———————————-23. Grand Rapids: -7,947
24. Akron: -65,852——————————————–24. Akron: -7,196
25. Youngstown: -64,558————————————25. Omaha: -6,931
26. Omaha: -62,030——————————————26. Youngstown: -6,842
27. Toledo: -59,436——————————————-27. Toledo: -6,624
28. Wichita: -51,734——————————————28. Wichita: 5,732
29. Des Moines: -44,857————————————29. Des Moines: 5,175
30. Canton: -41,233——————————————30. Lansing: -4,577
31. Lansing: -40,586—————————————–31. Madison: -4,453
32. Madison: -39,499—————————————-32. Canton: -4,395

Total Net Natural Change (Births vs. Deaths) By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2019 and July 1, 2018-July 1, 2019
Census 2010-July 1, 2019———————————July 1, 2018-July 1, 2019

1. Chicago: 438,246———————————————1. Chicago: 33,924
2. Minneapolis: 209,124—————————————-2. Minneapolis: 20,312
3. Austin: 149,806———————————————–3. Austin: 14,670
4. San Antonio: 146,693—————————————4. San Antonio: 14,041
5. San Jose: 126,304——————————————-5. San Jose: 10,905
6. Columbus: 108,626——————————————6. Columbus: 10,392
7. Las Vegas: 105,372—————————————–7. Indianapolis: 9,622
8. Kansas City: 98,218—————————————–8. Nashville: 9,186
9. Indianapolis: 97,491—————————————–9. Las Vegas: 9,129
10. Portland: 96,518——————————————-10. Kansas City: 8,805
11. Sacramento: 94,910————————————–11. Sacramento: 7,819
12. Nashville: 88,741——————————————12. Portland: 7,746
13. Detroit: 84,753———————————————-13. Detroit: 6,728
14. Virginia Beach: 78,552———————————–14. Cincinnati: 6,613
15. Cincinnati: 73,617—————————————–15. Virginia Beach: 6,309
16. St. Louis: 68,389——————————————-16. Omaha: 5,917
17. Omaha: 60,276———————————————17. Grand Rapids: 5,392
18. Milwaukee: 59,009—————————————–18. Milwaukee: 5,117
19. Grand Rapids: 55,687————————————19. Jacksonville: 4,503
20. Jacksonville: 52,866————————————–20. Des Moines: 4,136
21. Des Moines: 40,673————————————–21. St. Louis: 4,017
22. Wichita: 29,769——————————————–22. Madison: 2,535
23. Madison: 28,060——————————————23. Wichita: 2,325
24. Cleveland: 14,479—————————————-24. Lansing: 1,125
25. Lansing: 14,093——————————————25. Providence: 993
26. Providence: 13,788————————————–26. Dayton: 885
27. Toledo: 12,412——————————————–27. Toledo: 804
28. Dayton: 10,890——————————————-28. Cleveland: 539
29. Akron: 3,307———————————————-29. Akron: 0
30. Canton: -503———————————————-30. Canton: -141
31. Youngstown: -12,813———————————–31. Youngstown: -1,392
32. Pittsburgh: -35,527————————————–32. Pittsburgh: -4,817

Total Domestic Migration By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2019 and July 1, 2018-July 1, 2019
Census 2010-July 1, 2019———————————July 1, 2018-July 1, 2019

1. Austin: 293,162———————————————–1. Austin: 41,334
2. San Antonio; 214,509—————————————2. Las Vegas: 31,643
3. Las Vegas: 185,570—————————————–3. San Antonio: 21,987
4. Nashville: 158,336——————————————-4. Jacksonville: 20,051
5. Jacksonville: 126,483—————————————5. Nashville: 15,482
6. Portland: 121,473——————————————–6. Sacramento: 9,941
7. Sacramento: 69,723—————————————-7. Portland: 8,374
8. Columbus: 53,301——————————————-8. Indianapolis: 6,196
9. Indianapolis: 46,076—————————————-9. Columbus: 3,746
10. Des Moines: 40,183————————————–10. Des Moines: 3,718
11. Kansas City: 24,457————————————–11. Minneapolis: 3,202
12. Madison: 15,880——————————————12. Kansas City: 2,437
13. Minneapolis: 11,638————————————–13. Madison: 1,418
14. Grand Rapids: 10,903———————————–14. Cincinnati: 1,193
15. Omaha: 7,537———————————————-15. Omaha: 1,068
16. Canton: -7,124———————————————16. Dayton: 896
17. Dayton: -15,586——————————————–17. Wichita: -291
18. Akron: -15,683———————————————-18. Grand Rapids: -669
19. Lansing: -18,240——————————————-19. Canton: -677
20. Youngstown: -19,317————————————-20. Youngstown: -751
21. Cincinnati: -19,944—————————————-21. Lansing: -840
22. Wichita: -21,454——————————————-22. Akron: -1,190
23. Toledo: -27,740——————————————–23. Virginia Beach: -2,197
24. Pittsburgh: -31,804—————————————24. Toledo: -2,339
25. Providence: -38,503————————————-25. Pittsburgh: -2,658
26. Virginia Beach: -59,729———————————26. Providence: -3,185
27. Milwaukee: -64,395————————————–27. Milwaukee: -5,140
28. Cleveland: -78,763————————————–28. Cleveland: -7,250
29. St. Louis: -85,003—————————————-29. St. Louis: -7,685
30. San Jose: -124,105————————————-30. Detroit: -16,655
31. Detroit: -172,225—————————————–31. San Jose: -27,495
32. Chicago: -638,599—————————————32. Chicago: -74,950

Total International Migration By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2019 and July 1, 2018-July 1, 2019
Census 2010-July 1, 2019———————————July 1, 2018-July 1, 2019
1. Chicago: 197,093——————————————-1. Chicago: 15,257
2. San Jose: 152,520—————————————–2. San Jose: 13,371
3. Detroit: 110,907———————————————3. Detroit: 7,516
4. Minneapolis: 87,847—————————————4. Minneapolis: 6,645
5. Austin: 62,740———————————————–5. Indianapolis: 6,394
6. Columbus: 58,853——————————————6. Austin: 5,280
7. Sacramento: 51,225—————————————7. Nashville: 4,937
8. Providence: 49,015—————————————-8. Providence: 4,455
9. Portland: 47,983——————————————–9. Sacramento: 4,053
10. San Antonio: 45,348————————————10. Columbus: 4,032
11. Indianapolis: 43,502————————————-11. St. Louis: 2,991
12. Nashville: 39,422—————————————–12. Portland: 2,960
13. Virginia Beach: 36,319———————————-13. Pittsburgh: 2,555
14. Cleveland: 36,318—————————————-14. San Antonio: 2,504
15. Jacksonville: 34,089————————————-15. Kansas City: 2,377
16. St. Louis: 32,872—————————————–16. Jacksonville: 2,251
17. Cincinnati: 31,157—————————————-17. Cincinnati: 1,547
18. Pittsburgh: 30,654—————————————-18. Omaha: 1,517
19. Kansas City: 27,259————————————-19. Lansing: 1,452
20. Milwaukee: 25,298—————————————20. Cleveland: 1,433
21. Las Vegas: 23,319—————————————21. Grand Rapids: 1,316
22. Lansing: 19,865——————————————22. Milwaukee: 1,277
23. Grand Rapids: 17,629———————————-23. Virginia Beach: 1,165
24. Omaha: 16,785——————————————24. Madison: 988
25. Madison: 15,600—————————————–25. Akron: 836
26. Dayton: 13,473——————————————26. Dayton: 785
27. Akron: 13,086——————————————–27. Wichta: 688
28. Des Moines: 11,716————————————28. Des Moines: 519
29. Wichita: 9,096——————————————-29. Toledo: 270
30. Toledo: 5,646——————————————–30. Canton: 25
31. Youngstown: 2,675————————————-31. Youngstown: 25
32. Canton: 1,073——————————————–32. Las Vegas: -360

Total Net Migration By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2019 and July 1, 2018-July 1, 2019
Census 2010-July 1, 2019———————————July 1, 2018-July 1, 2019

1. Austin: 355,902———————————————1. Austin: 46,614
2. San Antonio: 259,857————————————-2. Las Vegas: 31,283
3. Las Vegas: 208,889—————————————3. San Antonio: 24,491
4. Nasvhille: 197,758—————————————–4. Jacksonville: 22,302
5. Portland: 169,456——————————————5. Nashville: 20,419
6. Jacksonville: 160,572————————————-6. Sacramento: 13,994
7. Sacramento: 120,948————————————-7. Indianapolis: 12,590
8. Columbus: 112,154—————————————-8. Portland: 11,334
9. Minneapolis: 99,458—————————————9. Minneapolis: 9,847
10. Indianapolis: 89,578————————————10. Columbus: 7,778
11. Des Moines: 51,899————————————-11. Kansas City: 4,814
12. Kansas City: 51,716————————————-12. Des Moines: 4,237
13. Madison: 31,480——————————————13. Cincinnati: 2,740
14. Grand Rapids: 28,352———————————–14. Omaha: 2,585
15. San Jose: 28,415—————————————-15. Madison: 2,406
16. Omaha: 24,322——————————————-16. Dayton: 1,681
17. Cincinnati: 11,213—————————————-17. Providence: 1,270
18. Providence: 10,512————————————–18. Grand Rapids: 647
19. Lansing: 1,625——————————————–19. Lansing: 612
20. Pittsburgh: -1,150—————————————-20. Wichita: 397
21. Dayton: -2,113——————————————–21. Pittsburgh: -103
22. Akron: -2,597———————————————-22. Akron: -354
23. Canton: -6,051——————————————–23. Canton: -652
24. Wichita: -12,358——————————————24. Youngstown: -726
25. Youngstown: -16,642————————————25. Virginia Beach: -1,032
26. Toledo: -22,094——————————————-26. Toledo: -2,069
27. Virginia Beach: -23,410——————————–27. Milwaukee: -3,863
28. Milwaukee: -39,097————————————-28. St. Louis: -4,694
29. Cleveland: -42,445————————————–29. Cleveland: -5,817
30. St. Louis: -52,131—————————————-30. Detroit: -9,139
31. Detroit: -61,318——————————————31. San Jose: -14,124
32. Chicago: -441,506————————————–32. Chicago: -59,693