Update- Historic Residential Pages

I added a few dozen more houses to the Historic Residential pages, mostly to the Other Residential page. These are some of the site’s most popular pages, so if anyone out there has old photos of homes or neighborhoods around Columbus, I would love to add them! In the meantime, enjoy the more than 325 featured historic homes.

Columbus Area Murders by Zip Code 2008-2015

*Originally posted in 2013, reposted on 3/4/2015 and again on 1/28/2016, with updated maps.

I have been wanting to do these maps for awhile now, as there have been several searches on the site for them and they weren’t available. It took a lot of work, but here they are!

2008

In 2008, almost all murders were contained within the I-270 boundaries. The East and South Sides were the worst areas.

2009

In 2009, there began to be a bit of diffusion on where murder was taking place. While parts of the urban core remained the worst areas, suburban areas also saw the occasional murder.

2010

The diffusion continued in 2010.

2011

And in 2011.

2012

2012 was the most diffuse of all the years, with no heavily concentrated areas, even in the urban core as much. Meanwhile, most of the suburban zip codes within Franklin County saw at least 1 murder.

2013

2014

2015 saw most activity on the eastern side of the city, particular South Linden and the Far East Side around Whitehall and Reynoldsburg, but all areas along the 270 area on the Far East Side had the highest levels of murder in the county. The central core generally stayed a lot lower.

Columbus Walkability 2015, and the Flaws of WalkScore

WalkScore has update its rankings and numbers for US cities in terms of walkability, transit and bikes. https://www.walkscore.com/cities-and-neighborhoods/

Columbus does not rank all that highly for walkability. Here are the 2014 and 2015 numbers for comparison. Keep in mind that this is just one site’s ranking of walkability, and any changes may not actually mean much, if anything. In Columbus’ case, many urban neighborhoods which have been feverishly building infill have inexplicably had their numbers drop over the course of the year. This seems very strange, and highly unlikely that these areas actually became less walkable.

Top 25 Most Walkable Columbus Neighborhoods, 2014 and 2015
2014                                                                          2015
1. Downtown: 86——————————————1. Necko: 86
2. Dennison Place (Short North): 85———————-2. German Village: 85
3. Italian Village (Short North): 85———————3. Weinland Park: 84
4. Weinland Park (Just northeast of Short North): 85—–4. Schumacher Place: 84
5. Indiana Forest (Northeast Campus Area): 84————5. Italian Village: 84
6. Necko (South Campus): 81——————————6. Indiana Forest: 83
7. Victorian Village (Short North): 81——————-7. Victorian Village: 80
8. Old North Columbus: 80——————————–8. Dennison Place: 80
9. Glen Echo (North Columbus): 80————————9. OSU Campus: 78
10. North Campus: 80————————————-10. Iuka Ravine: 77
11. German Village: 79———————————–11. Downtown: 77
12. Tri-Village (5th Avenue West): 79——————–12. Brewery District: 76
13. Brewery District: 78———————————13. Tri-Village: 75
14. OSU Campus: 77—————————————14. Indianola Terrace: 75
15. Iuka Ravine (North Columbus): 76———————15. Clintonville: 74
16. Clintonville: 75————————————-16. King-Lincoln: 74
17: King-Lincoln (Near East Side): 74——————–17. Old North Columbus: 73
18. Schumacher Place (Near South Side): 73—————18. Olde Towne East: 71
19. Busch (Northwest Columbus): 72———————–19. Merion Village; 71
20. Indianola Terrace (North Columbus): 71—————20. North Campus: 70
21. Merion Village: 69———————————–21. Glen Echo: 69
22. Governours Square (Bethel and Henderson): 68———22. Livingston Park North: 67
23: Harrison West (Hilltop): 67————————–23. Southern Orchards: 67
24. Old Beechwold (North Columbus): 67——————-24. Mount Vernon: 66
25. Olde Towne East: 67———————————-25. Woodland Park: 64

So why might the numbers have gone down in so many urban areas that are seeing large amounts of infill and revitalization? Well, part of the methodology used to compute the WalkScores are US Census tract population data. The most recent Census estimates had large amounts of urban tracts losing population within the urban core, even in high-growth areas like the Short North and Downtown. If these incorrect estimates were incorporated, it might appear that such areas were in decline rather than in the rapid growth they are experiencing in reality, and that associated amenities are going down as well. There’s really no other explanation. The simple fact is, however, that these areas, with perhaps some exceptions, are NOT becoming less walkable, but more. This is a classic case of garbage in, garbage out. Columbus is not a particularly walkable city overall, by any means, but this data really has to be taken with a huge grain of salt.

Overall Columbus Neighborhood Walkability Score Breakdown, 2014 and 2015
2014       2015
90-100 (Walker’s Paradise): 0——–0
70-89 (Very Walkable): 20———–20
50-69 (Somewhat Walkable): 72——-37
0-49 (Car Dependent): 120———–155

Average Columbus Walkability Score, 2014 and 2015

2014: 47
2015: 40

Bike and Transit scores did improve over 2014, but they’re unrelated to population changes and amenities, which would indicate the real movement of Columbus rather than its walkability scores.

Bike Score Neighborhood Breakdown, 2014 and 2015
2014     2015
90-100: 0———0
70-89: 14———14
50-69: 45———45
0-49: 153———153

Average Columbus Bike Score, 2014 and 2015
2014: 45
2015: 46

Transit Score Neighborhood Breakdown, 2014 and 2015
2014     2015
90-100: 0——–0
70-89: 0———0
50-69: 11——–15
0-49: 201——–197

Average Columbus Transit Score, 2014 and 2015
2014: 29
2015: 30

Random Columbus Photos #1

Photo Date: January 15, 1936
Location: Parkwood Avenue, East Linden

This random street scene photo was taken during the frigid winter of 1935-36. I couldn’t pinpoint exactly where the photo was taken, only that the style of homes indicates that it was taken looking north between Earl and Denune Avenues. Little has changed on Parkwood in the last 79 years. The area still looks and feels a little rural, and there are still no sidewalks. The one change, however, is that the roads are no longer dirt.

The day of the photo was fairly mild, with highs in the mid-40s. The next day, however, a snowstorm struck that dropped about 5″ of snow, and just a week later, temperatures hit 16 degrees below zero.