2017 Ohio County/Metro Population Estimates Part 1




Early this morning, the Census released the most recent population figures for counties, Metropolitan Statistical Areas and Consolidated Statistical Areas. The estimates cover the year from July 1, 2016 to July 1, 2017. For Part 1, we are going to take a look at counties.

Here are Ohio’s 88 counties and their population Census 2010, July 1, 2016 and July 1, 2017. The counties highlighted by color are as follows:
Akron Metro Counties
Canton  Metro Counties
Cincinnati Metro Counties (Ohio Only)
Cleveland Metro Counties
Columbus Metro Counties
Dayton Metro Counties
Toledo Metro Counties
Youngstown Metro Counties
Black are non-metro counties.

Census 2010——————————July 1, 2016————————-July 1, 2017
1. Cuyahoga: 1,280,122———–1. Franklin: 1,269,998———–1. Franklin: 1,291,981
2. Franklin: 1,163,414————2. Cuyahoga: 1,253,454——–2. Cuyahoga: 1,248,514
3. Hamilton: 802,374 ————–3. Hamilton: 810,087————-3. Hamilton: 813,822
4. Summit: 541,781—————-4. Summit: 540,394—————4. Summit: 541,228
5. Montgomery: 535,153——5. Montgomery: 531,395——–5. Montgomery: 530,604
6. Lucas: 441,815——————6. Lucas: 432,562—————–6. Lucas 430,887
7. Stark: 375,586——————-7. Butler: 377,933——————7. Butler: 380,604
8. Butler: 368,130——————8. Stark: 373,528——————8. Stark: 372,542
9. Lorain: 301,356—————–9. Lorain: 306,590——————9. Lorain: 307,924
10. Mahoning: 238,823———10. Mahoning: 230,169————10. Lake: 230,117
11. Lake: 230,041—————–11. Lake: 229,270——————11. Mahoning: 229,796
12. Warren: 212,693————-12. Warren: 226,476—————12. Warren: 228,882
13. Trumbull: 210,312———–13. Clermont: 203,016————13. Clermont: 204,214
14. Clermont: 197,363———–14. Trumbull: 201,701————-14. Delaware: 200,464
15. Delaware: 174,214———–15. Delaware: 196,777————15. Trumbull: 200,380
16. Medina: 172,332————-16. Medina: 176,903—————16. Medina: 178,371
17. Licking: 166,492————–17. Licking: 171,822—————17. Licking: 173,448
18. Greene: 161,573————–18. Greene: 165,109—————-18. Greene: 166,752
19. Portage: 161,419————-19. Portage: 162,162—————19. Portage: 162,277
20. Fairfield: 146,156————20. Fairfield: 152,681—————-20. Fairfield: 154,733
21. Clark: 138,333—————–21. Clark: 134,621——————–21. Clark: 134,557
22. Wood: 125,488—————22. Wood: 129,704——————-22. Wood: 130,492
23. Richland: 124,475————23. Richland: 121,167—————-23. Richland: 120,589
24. Wayne: 114,520————–24. Wayne: 116,422——————24. Wayne: 116,038
25. Columbiana: 107,841——-25. Miami: 104,382——————–25. Miami: 105,122
26. Allen: 106,331—————-26. Columbiana: 103,744————26. Allen: 103,198
27. Miami: 102,506————–27. Allen: 103,626——————27. Columbiana: 103,077
28. Ashtabula: 101,497———28. Ashtabula: 98,169————–28. Ashtabula: 97,807
29. Geauga: 93,389————-29. Geauga: 93,848—————–29. Geauga: 93,918
30. Tuscarawas: 92,582——–30. Tuscarawas: 92,485————30. Tuscarawas: 92,297
31. Muskingum: 86,074———31. Muskingum: 85,929————-31. Muskingum: 86,149
32. Scioto: 79,499—————-32. Ross: 76,910———————32. Ross: 77,313
33. Ross: 78,064—————–33. Scioto: 76,240——————–33. Scioto: 75,929
34. Erie: 77,079——————34. Hancock: 75,590—————–34. Hancock: 75,754
35. Hancock: 74,782————35. Erie: 74,944———————–35. Erie: 74,817
36. Belmont: 70,400————-36. Belmont: 68,568—————–36. Belmont: 68,029
37. Jefferson: 69,709————37. Jefferson: 66,914—————37. Athens: 66,597
38. Marion: 66,501—————38. Athens: 66,320——————38. Jefferson: 66,359
39. Athens: 64,757—————39. Marion: 65,334——————39. Marion: 64,967
40. Lawrence: 62,450———–40. Knox: 60,832———————40. Knox: 61,261
41. Washington: 61,778———41. Lawrence: 60,729————–41. Washington: 60,418
42. Sandusky: 60,944————42. Washington: 60,535———–42. Lawrence: 60,249
43. Knox: 60,921——————43. Sandusky: 59,281————–43. Sandusky: 59,195
44. Huron: 59,626—————–44. Huron: 58,391——————-44. Huron: 58,494
45. Seneca: 56,745—————45. Pickaway: 57,530—————45. Pickaway: 57,830
46. Pickaway: 55,698————-46. Union: 55,456——————-46. Union: 56,741
47. Ashland: 53,139—————47. Seneca: 55,357—————–47. Seneca: 55,243
48. Darke: 53,139—————–48. Ashland: 53,417—————–48. Ashland: 53,628
49. Union: 52,300——————49. Darke: 51,636——————-49. Darke: 51,536
50. Shelby: 49,423—————–50. Shelby: 48,726—————–50. Shelby: 48,759
51. Auglaize: 45,949————–51. Auglaize: 45,797—————-51. Auglaize: 45,778
52. Logan: 45,858—————–52. Logan: 45,171——————-52. Logan: 45,325
53. Brown: 44,846—————–53. Holmes: 43,832—————–53. Madison: 44,036
54. Crawford: 43,784————-54. Brown: 43,644——————-54. Holmes: 43,957
55. Highland: 43,589————-55. Madison: 43,354—————–55. Brown: 43,576
56. Madison: 43,435————-56. Highland: 42,993—————–56. Highland: 42,971
57. Fulton: 42,698—————-57. Fulton: 42,325——————–57. Fulton: 42,289
58. Holmes: 42,366————–58. Crawford: 42,037—————–58. Clinton: 42,009
59. Preble: 42,270—————-59. Clinton: 41,881——————-59. Crawford: 41,746
60. Clinton: 42,040—————60. Preble: 41,105——————–60. Preble: 41,120
61. Ottawa: 41,428—————61. Mercer: 40,710——————-61. Mercer: 40,873
62. Mercer: 40,814—————62. Ottawa: 40,495——————-62. Ottawa: 40,657
63. Champaign: 40,097———63. Guernsey: 39,200—————63. Guernsey: 39,093
64. Guernsey: 40,087———–64. Champaign: 38,737————-64. Champaign: 38,840
65. Defiance: 39,037————65. Defiance: 38,121—————–65. Defiance: 38,156
66. Williams: 37,642————66. Williams: 36,921——————66. Williams: 36,784
67. Coshocton: 36,901———-67. Coshocton: 36,644————-67. Coshocton: 36,544
68. Perry: 36,058—————–68. Perry: 36,019——————–68. Perry: 36,024
69. Morrow: 34,827————–69. Morrow: 34,827——————69. Morrow: 34,994
70. Putnam: 34,499————–70. Putnam: 34,016—————–70. Putnam: 33,878
71. Jackson: 33,225————-71. Jackson: 32,534—————–71. Jackson: 32,449
72. Hardin: 32,058—————72. Hardin: 31,407——————-72. Hardin: 31,364
73. Gallia: 30,934—————-73. Gallia: 29,996———————73. Gallia: 29,973
74. Hocking: 29,380————-74. Fayette: 28,662——————74. Fayette: 28,752
75. Fayette: 29,030————–75. Hocking: 28,386—————–75. Hocking: 28,474
76. Carroll: 28,836—————76. Pike: 28,237———————–76. Pike: 28,270
77. Van Wert: 28,744————77. Van Wert: 28,166—————-77. Van Wert: 28,217
78. Pike: 28,709——————-78. Adams: 27,832——————-78. Adams: 27,726
79. Adams: 28,550—————79. Carroll: 27,637——————–79. Carroll: 27,385
80. Henry: 28,215—————-80. Henry: 27,269———————80. Henry: 27,185
81. Meigs: 23,770—————-81. Meigs: 23,177———————81. Meigs: 23,080
82. Wyandot: 22,615————-82. Wyandot: 22,042—————-82. Wyandot: 22,029
83. Paulding: 19,614————83. Paulding: 18,839——————83. Paulding: 18,845
84. Harrison: 15,864————-84. Harrison: 15,257——————84. Harrison: 15,216
85. Morgan: 15,054————–85. Morgan: 14,762——————-85. Morgan: 14,709
86. Noble: 14,645—————–86. Noble: 14,443———————86. Noble: 14,406
87. Monroe: 14,642————–87. Monroe: 14,097——————–87. Monroe: 13,946
88. Vinton: 13,435—————-88. Vinton: 13,021———————88. Vinton: 13,092

Columbus’ counties tended to move up in the rankings 2010-2017.




Let’s now take a look at total growth for the periods July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017 and Census 2010 to July 1, 2017.

Census 2010-July 1, 2017————————-July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +128,452—————————–1. Franklin: +21,983
2. Delaware: +26,275—————————–2. Hamilton: +3,735
3. Warren: +16,049——————————–3. Delaware: +3,687
4. Butler: +12,474———————————-4. Butler: +2,671
5. Hamilton: +11,435——————————5. Warren: +2,406
6. Fairfield: +8,556——————————–6. Fairfield: +2,052
7. Licking: +6,956———————————7. Greene: +1,643
8. Clermont: +6,862——————————-8. Licking: +1,626
9. Lorain: +6,555———————————–9. Medina: +1,468
10. Medina: +6,038——————————-10. Lorain: +1,334
11. Greene: +5,178——————————-11. Union: +1,285
12. Wood: +5,003———————————12. Clermont: +1,198
13. Union: +4,482———————————13. Lake: +847
14. Miami: +2,621———————————14. Summit: +834
15. Pickaway: +2,152—————————–15. Wood: +788
16. Athens: +1,833——————————–16. Miami: +740
17. Holmes: +1,593——————————–17. Madison: +682
18. Wayne: +1,522———————————18. Knox: +429
19. Hancock: +965———————————19. Ross: +403
20. Portage: +856———————————-20. Pickaway: +300
21. Madison: +598———————————21. Athens: +277
22. Geauga: +508———————————-22. Muskingum: +220
23. Ashland: +489———————————23. Ashland: +211
24. Knox: +331————————————-24. Hancock: +164
25. Morrow: +167———————————25. Mercer: +163
26. Lake: +67————————————–26. Ottawa: +162
27. Muskingum: +63—————————–27. Logan: +154
28. Mercer: +59———————————-28. Montgomery: +147
29. Perry: -15————————————-29. Clinton: +128
30. Clinton: -28———————————–30. Holmes: +125
31. Auglaize: -171——————————-31. Portage: +115
32. Noble: -239———————————–32. Champaign: +103
33. Fayette: -273——————————–33. Huron: +103
34. Tuscarawas: -285————————–34. Fayette: +90
35. Vinton: -338———————————35. Hocking: +88
36. Morgan: -347——————————-36. Vinton: +71
37. Coshocton: -354—————————37. Geauga: +70
38. Fulton: -409———————————38. Van Wert: +51
39. Pike: -432———————————–39. Morrow: +40
40. Van Wert: -526—————————-40. Defiance: +35
41. Logan: -529———————————41. Pike: +33
42. Summit: -554——————————-42. Shelby: +33
43. Wyandot: -586——————————43. Preble: +15
44. Putnam: -618——————————-44. Paulding: +6
45. Highland: -629—————————–45. Perry: +5
46. Harrison: -646——————————46. Wyandot: -13
47. Shelby: -659——————————–47. Auglaize: -19
48. Meigs: -687———————————48. Highland: -22
49. Hardin: -696——————————–49. Gallia: -23
50. Monroe: -696——————————-50. Fulton: -36
51. Ross: -752———————————-51. Noble: -37
52. Paulding: -770——————————52. Harrison: -41
53. Jackson: -777——————————53. Hardin: -43
54. Ottawa: -777——————————-54. Morgan: -53
55. Adams: -826——————————-55. Clark: -64
56. Williams: -864—————————–56. Brown: -68
57. Defiance: -875—————————-57. Henry: -84
58. Hocking: -899—————————–58. Jackson: -85
59. Gallia: -973——————————–59. Sandusky: -86
60. Guernsey: -998————————–60. Meigs: -97
61. Henry: -1,030—————————–61. Coshocton: -100
62. Huron: -1,131—————————–62. Darke: -100
63. Preble: -1,139—————————-63. Adams: -106
64. Champaign: -1,253———————64. Guernsey: -107
65. Brown: -1,267—————————-65. Seneca: -114
66. Washington: -1,360———————66. Washington: -117
67. Darke: -1,433—————————-67. Erie: -127
68. Carroll: -1,451—————————68. Williams: -137
69. Seneca: -1,499————————-69. Putnam: -138
70. Marion: -1,534————————–70. Monroe: -151
71. Sandusky: -1,751———————-71. Tuscarawas: -188
72. Crawford: -2,039———————–72. Carroll: -252
73. Lawrence: -2,199———————-73. Crawford: -291
74. Erie: -2,249—————————–74. Scioto: -311
75. Belmont: -2,373————————75. Ashtabula: -362
76. Stark: -3,050—————————-76. Marion: -367
77. Allen: -3,128—————————-77. Mahoning: -373
78. Jefferson: -3,350———————-78. Wayne: -384
79. Scioto: -3,568————————–79. Allen: -428
80. Montgomery: -3,634——————80. Lawrence: -480
81. Ashtabula: -3,681———————81. Belmont: -539
82. Clark: -3,790—————————82. Jefferson: -555
83. Richland: -3,887———————-83. Richland: -578
84. Columbiana: -4,764——————84. Columbiana: -667
85. Mahoning: -9,011———————85. Stark: -986
86. Trumbull: -9,938———————-86. Trumbull: -1,321
87. Lucas: -10,928————————87. Lucas: -1,675
88. Cuyahoga: -31,595——————88. Cuyahoga: -4,940

Finally, let’s examine the components of population change, but top 15 only.

Top 15 Counties with the Most Births Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +134,9580———————————–1. Franklin: +19,039
2. Cuyahoga: +107,949———————————-2. Cuyahoga: +14,637
3. Hamilton: +79,087————————————-3. Hamilton: +10,787
4. Montgomery: +48,275——————————–4. Montgomery: +6,576
5. Summit: +44,151—————————————5. Summit: +5,945
6. Lucas: +40,874—————————————–6. Lucas: +5,494
7. Butler: +32,888—————————————–7. Butler: +4,531
8. Stark: +30,188——————————————8. Stark: +4,163
9. Lorain: +24,497—————————————-9. Lorain: +3,329
10. Warren: +17,492————————————-10. Mahoning: +2,382
11. Mahoning: +17,312———————————11. Warren: +2,376
12. Clermont: +16,980———————————-12. Clermont: +2,307
13. Lake: +16,465—————————————–13. Lake: +2,244
14. Delaware: +15,662———————————-14. Delaware: +2,146
15. Trumbull: +15,153———————————–15. Trumbull: +2,059

Top 15 Counties with the Fewest Births Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Noble: +1,020——————————————-1. Noble: +131
2. Morgan: +1,050—————————————–2. Monroe: +135
3. Vinton: +1,051——————————————-3. Morgan: +139
4. Monroe: +1,083—————————————–4. Vinton: +144
5. Harrison: +1,150—————————————-5. Harrison: +149
6. Paulding: +1,595—————————————-6. Paulding: +213
7. Meigs: +1,762——————————————-7. Meigs: +228
8. Wyandot: +1,849—————————————8. Wyandot: +240
9. Carroll: +2,011—————————————–9. Carroll: +271
10. Hocking: +2,282————————————-10. Henry: +291
11. Henry: +2,295—————————————–11. Hocking: +309
12. Van Wert: +2,373————————————-12. Adams: +322
13. Adams: +2,431—————————————-13. Pike: +328
14. Ottawa: +2,489—————————————-14. Van Wert: +328
15. Pike: +2,504——————————————–15. Ottawa: +334

Top 15 Counties with the Most Deaths Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Cuyahoga: -98,692———————————–1. Cuyahoga: -13,439
2. Franklin: -65,458————————————–2. Franklin: -9,542
3. Hamilton: -56,157————————————-3. Hamilton: -7,768
4. Montgomery: -42,353——————————-4. Montgomery: -5,883
5. Summit: -40,895————————————–5. Summit: -5,735
6. Lucas: -31,778—————————————-6. Lucas: -4,465
7. Stark: -29.531—————————————–7. Stark: -4,077
8. Butler: -22,747—————————————-8. Butler: -3,347
9. Mahoning: -22,021———————————–9. Lorain: -2,947
10. Lorain: -21,265————————————-10. Mahoning: -2,920
11. Trumbull: -18,189———————————-11. Trumbull: -2,459
12. Lake: -17,265—————————————-12. Lake: -2,444
13. Clark: -12,267—————————————-13. Warren: -1,785
14. Clermont: -11,924———————————-14. Clermont: -1,706
15. Warren: -11,411————————————-15. Clark: -1,680

Top 15 Counties with the Fewest Deaths Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Noble: -916————————————————1. Noble: -131
2. Vinton: -1,025———————————————2. Vinton: -147
3. Morgan: -1,215——————————————-3. Morgan: -152
4. Monroe: -1,260——————————————-4. Harrison: -186
5. Paulding: -1,405—————————————–5. Paulding: -186
6. Harrison: -1,449——————————————6. Monroe: -189
7. Wyandot: -1,756—————————————–7. Wyandot: -246
8. Meigs: -2,004———————————————8. Henry: -249
9. Henry: -2,007———————————————9. Carroll: -289
10. Hocking: -2,131—————————————10. Meigs: -290
11. Putnam: -2,153—————————————–11. Hocking: -294
12. Carroll: -2,191—————————————–12. Putnam: -303
13. Holmes: -2,191—————————————–13. Van Wert: -306
14. Van Wert: -2,275—————————————14. Morrow: -308
15. Hardin: -2,284——————————————-15. Fayette: -318

Top 15 Counties with the Highest Natural Increase (Births vs. Deaths) Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +69,500————————————-1. Franklin: +9,497
2. Hamilton: +22,930————————————2. Hamilton: +3,019
3. Butler: +10,141—————————————-3. Cuyahoga: +1,198
4. Cuyahoga: +9,257————————————4. Butler: +1,184
5. Lucas: +9,096——————————————5. Lucas: +1,029
6. Delaware: +8,339————————————-6. Delaware: +1,013
7. Warren: +6,081—————————————-7. Montgomery: +693
8. Montgomery: +5,922——————————–8. Clermont: +601
9. Clermont: +5,056————————————-9. Warren: +591
10. Holmes: +3,410————————————–10. Holmes: +445
11. Fairfield: +3,380————————————-11. Guernsey: +414
12. Wayne: +3,313—————————————12. Licking: +408
13. Summit: +3,256————————————-13. Wayne: +406
14. Lorain: +3,232—————————————14. Lorain: +382
15. Licking: +3,173————————————–15. Fairfield: +378

Top 15 Counties with the Lowest Natural Increase (Births vs. Deaths) Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Mahoning: -4,709—————————————1. Mahoning: -538
2. Trumbull: -3,036—————————————-2. Trumbull: -400
3. Jefferson: -2,097—————————————–3. Jefferson: -276
4. Belmont: -1,370——————————————4. Lake: -200
5. Erie: -990————————————————–5. Belmont: -197
6. Ottawa: -977———————————————-6. Ottawa: -171
7. Columbiana: -891—————————————7. Washington: -134
8. Washington: -829—————————————8. Erie: -132
9. Lake: -800———————————————–9. Columbiana: -130
10. Clark: -694———————————————10. Clark: -119
11. Scioto: -493——————————————–11. Scioto: -68
12. Crawford: -363—————————————-12.  Lawrence: -67
13. Ashtabula: -354—————————————13. Meigs: -62
14. Harrison: -299—————————————–14. Monroe: -54
15. Lawrence: -285—————————————15. Harrison: -37

Top 15 Counties with the Most Domestic Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +18,270———————————-1. Franklin: +5,861
2. Delaware: +15,671———————————2. Delaware: +2,346
3. Warren: +6,996————————————-3. Fairfield: +1,491
4. Fairfield: +4,106————————————4. Warren: +1,332
5. Licking: +3,332————————————-5. Licking: +1,137
6. Medina: +2,900————————————-6. Medina: +1,058
7. Union: +1,953—————————————7. Union: +871
8. Pickaway: +1,489———————————-8. Greene: +763
9. Wood: +1,447—————————————9. Lake: +748
10. Clermont: +1,372——————————–10. Butler: +668
11. Miami: +1,293————————————-11. Madison: +639
12. Ottawa: +224————————————–12. Miami: +547
13. Madison: +177————————————13. Clermont: +515
14. Morgan: -186————————————–14. Ross: +379
15. Lorain: -271—————————————-15. Ottawa: +337

Top 15 Counties with the Least Domestic Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Cuyahoga: -65,672————————————-1. Cuyahoga: -10,087
2. Hamilton: -25,292—————————————2. Lucas: -3,249
3. Lucas: -23,401——————————————-3. Montgomery: -1,656
4. Montgomery: -16,752———————————-4. Hamilton: -1,533
5. Summit: -10,630—————————————–5. Stark: -1,232
6. Trumbull: -6,852—————————————–6. Trumbull: -923
7. Mahoning: -6,113—————————————7. Wayne: -897
8. Allen: -4,673———————————————–8. Allen: -618
9. Stark: -4,510———————————————-9. Richland: -613
10. Richland: -4,240—————————————-10. Columbiana: -528
11. Columbiana: -3,802————————————11. Portage: -425
12. Ashtabula: -3,779—————————————12. Ashtabula: -412
13. Scioto: -3,267——————————————–13. Lawrence: -392
14. Clark: -3,198———————————————14. Marion: -389
15. Portage: -2,797—————————————–15. Tuscarawas: -382

Top 15 Counties with the Most International Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +40,914—————————————1. Franklin: +6,584
2. Cuyahoga: +24,799————————————2. Cuyahoga: +3,961
3. Hamilton: +14,063————————————–3. Hamilton: +2,288
4. Montgomery: +7,418————————————4. Montgomery: +1,131
5. Summit: +7,132——————————————5. Summit: +1,101
6. Butler: +5,226——————————————–6. Butler: +839
7. Lorain: +3,810——————————————–7. Lorain: +641
8. Greene: +3,443——————————————8. Portage: +546
9. Portage: +3,281—————————————–9. Lucas: +539
10. Lucas: +3,247——————————————10. Warren: +499
11. Warren: +3,140—————————————-11. Greene: +473
12. Delaware: +2,178————————————-12. Delaware: +336
13. Athens: +2,081—————————————–13. Athens: +326
14. Mahoning: +1,917————————————-14. Mahoning: +326
15. Lake: +1,740——————————————–15. Lake: +314

Top 15 Counties with the Least International Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Lawrence: -168——————————————1. Lawrence: -19
2. Belmont: -113——————————————–2. Belmont: -18
3. Jefferson: -108——————————————-3. Jefferson: -16
4. Columbiana: -44—————————————–4. Columbiana: -7
5. Williams: -40———————————————-5. Williams: -6
6. Brown: -39————————————————6. Brown: -4
7. Holmes: -16———————————————–7. Holmes: -3
8. Monroe: -5————————————————8. Monroe: -1
9. Vinton: -2————————————————–9. Van Wert: -1
10. Meigs: 0————————————————10. Harrison: 0
11. Trumbull: +2——————————————-11. Ottawa: 0
12. Harrison: +4——————————————-12. Vinton: 0
13. Adams: +7———————————————13. Meigs: +1
14. Van Wert: +10—————————————-14. Noble: +1
15. Noble: +10——————————————–15. Pike: +1
16. Morgan: +10

Top 15 Counties with the Most Net Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +59,184—————————————1. Franklin: +12,445
2. Delaware: +17,849————————————–2. Delaware: +2,682
3. Warren: +10,136—————————————-3. Warren: +1,831
4. Fairfield: +5,274—————————————–4. Fairfield: +1,686
5. Licking: +3,928——————————————5. Butler: +1,507
6. Lorain: +3,539——————————————–6. Greene: +1,236
7. Medina: +3,492——————————————-7. Licking: +1,225
8. Wood: +2,720———————————————8. Medina: +1,142
9. Butler: +2,527——————————————–9. Lake: +1,062
10. Union: +2,415—————————————–10. Lorain: +969
11. Greene: +2,038—————————————-11. Union: +952
12. Clermont: +1,975————————————-12. Hamilton: +755
13. Miami: +1,662——————————————-13. Madison: +679
14. Pickaway: +1,556————————————-14. Summit: +649
15. Athens: +1,285——————————————15. Clermont +609

Top 15 Counties with the Least Net Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Cuyahoga: -40,873————————————1. Cuyahoga: -6,126
2. Lucas: -20,154——————————————2. Lucas: -2,710
3. Hamilton: -11,229————————————–3. Stark: -1,061
4. Montgomery: -9,334———————————–4. Trumbull: -918
5. Trumbull: -6,850—————————————-5. Wayne: -794
6. Allen: -4,504———————————————6. Allen: -596
7. Mahoning: -4,196————————————–7. Richland: -587
8. Richland: -4,087—————————————-8. Columbiana: -535
9. Columbiana: -3,846————————————9. Montgomery: -525
10. Summit: -3,496—————————————-10. Lawrence: -411
11. Stark: -3,408——————————————-11. Marion: -379
12. Ashtabula: -3,327————————————-12. Belmont: -341
13. Scioto: -3,064——————————————13. Ashtabula: -336
14. Clark: -3,032——————————————–14. Tuscarawas: -326
15. Huron: -2,359——————————————-15. Holmes: -319

So there you have it for counties.  Part 2 on Metro and CSAs will be coming soon!




The Origins of the Columbus Metro’s Domestic Migration




Top 30 Largest Net Domestic In-Migration Origins (Ohio Counties and States)

Numbers are based on estimates. Updated 1/24/2018 with 2011-2015 data.

2006-2010————————2009-2013—————————-2011-2015
1. Cuyahoga: 1602———-1. Cuyahoga: 1905————–1. Cuyahoga: 1842
2. Montgomery: 1020——-2. Michigan: 1425—————-2. Michigan: 1239
3. Michigan: 893————-3. Montgomery: 1123————3. Montgomery: 1088
4. Maryland: 745————-4. Summit: 744——————–4. Summit: 764
5. Lorain: 740—————–5. Lorain: 715———————-5. Lucas: 626
6. Virginia: 636—————6. Indiana: 694———————6. New Jersey: 608
7. Mahoning: 603————7. Lucas: 569———————–7. New York: 575
8. Stark: 584——————8. Maryland: 512——————-8. Medina: 572
9. Lucas: 554—————–9. Hamilton: 504——————–9. Stark: 484
10. Summit: 531————-10. Clermont: 466—————–10. Trumbull: 465
11. Highland: 499———–11. Stark: 466———————–11. Maryland: 464
12. New Jersey: 497——-12. Arizona: 463——————–12. Allen: 406
13. Hamilton: 483———–13. Alabama: 431——————-13. Washington (state): 399
14. New York: 419———-14. Trumbull: 401——————-14. Erie: 386
15. Allen: 384—————-15. Mahoning: 387——————15. Indiana: 386
16. Tennessee: 375——–16. Fayette: 354———————16. Massachusetts: 384
17. Logan: 328—————17. Washington (state): 353—–17. Pennsylvania: 371
18. Trumbull: 325————18. Coshocton: 346—————-18. Kentucky: 368
19. Coshocton: 310———19. Medina: 322——————–19. W. Virginia: 339
20. Jefferson: 290———–20. Allen: 302————————20. Lake: 316
21. Scioto: 259—————21. Erie: 290————————-21. Belmont: 314
22. Belmont: 254————22. Highland: 270——————-22. Wayne: 298
23. Huron: 245—————23. Puerto Rico: 265—————23. Fayette: 290
24. Darke: 217—————24. Adams: 260———————24. Mahoning: 289
25. Lake: 212—————-25. Warren: 260———————25. New Hampshire: 288
26. Tuscarawas: 202——-26. Massachusetts: 259———-26. Alaska: 282
27. Iowa: 200—————–27. Wayne: 259———————27. Alabama: 280
28. Shelby: 199————–28. Morgan: 255——————–28. Lorain: 277
29. Medina: 196————-29. Tuscarawas: 253————–29. Tuscarawas: 277
30. Massachusetts: 192—30. Ashtabula: 244—————–30. Geauga: 261

Top 30 Largest Net Domestic Out-Migration Destinations (Ohio counties and States)

2006-2010——————————-2009-2013—————————-2011-2015
1. Texas: -1371———————-1. Georgia: -1024—————-1. Florida: -1333
2. Knox: -942————————-2. Florida: -1013——————2. Missouri: -703
3. North Carolina: -782————3. Greene: -524——————-3. Georgia: -680
4. Georgia: -718———————4. Missouri: -516——————4. Athens: -607
5. Athens: -679———————-5. Colorado: -448—————–5. Knox: -506
6. Kentucky: -516——————-6. California: -436—————–6. Tennessee: -442
7. South Carolina: -499———–7. South Carolina: -431———-7. Colorado: -435
8. California: -364——————-8. Knox: -418———————-8. California: -391
9. Florida: -360———————-9. North Carolina: -417———-9. Greene: -388
10. Wood: -351———————10. Wisconsin: -395————–10. South Carolina: -362
11. Richland: -344——————11. Athens: -336——————11. Marion: -329
12. Greene: -239——————–12. Minnesota: -308————-12. Hamilton: -312
13. West Virginia: -236————13. Utah: -290———————13. Logan: -306
14. Missouri: -219——————-14. Richland: -266—————14. Utah: -300
15. Crawford: -209——————15. Portage: -265—————–15. Wood: -282
16. Hardin: -179———————16. Kentucky: -257—————16. Scioto: -249
17. Noble: -177———————-17. Logan: -242——————-17. Seneca: -183
18. Muskingum: -175—————18. Pennsylvania: -242———18. Champaign: -174
19. Butler: -173———————-19. Tennessee: -200————19. Oregon: -158
20. Holmes: -163——————–20. Oregon: -187—————-20. New Mexico: -157
21. Marion: -138———————21. Wood: -166——————21. Meigs: -150
22. Portage: -134——————-22. Sandusky: -157————–22. Mississippi: -146
23. Ottawa: -131——————–23. Mississippi: -151————-23. Portage: -142
24. Sandusky: -124—————-24. Jefferson: -127—————24. Idaho: -137
25. Oregon: -120——————-25. Kansas: -98——————-25. Minnesota: -125
26. Indiana: -116——————-26. Delaware (state): -88——-26. North Dakota: -112
27. Idaho: -115———————27. Idaho: -74———————-27. Wisconsin: -111
28. Utah: -103———————- 28. Crawford: -73—————–28. Darke: -103
29. Fayette: -93———————29. Hardin: -68——————–29. Texas: -95
30. Kansas: -90———————30. Seneca: -66——————-30. Hardin: -87

Top 25 Largest Positive Swings Between 2006-2010 and 2011-2015
1. Texas: +1276
2. North Carolina: +982
3. Kentucky: +884
4. West Virginia: +575
5. Indiana: +502
6. Washington (state): +466
7. Knox: +436
8. Richland: +406
9. Butler: +395
10. Fayette: +383
11. Medina: +376
12. Alaska: +364
13. Michigan: +346
14. Alabama: +298
15. Clinton: +282
16. Erie: +263
17. New Hampshire: +261
18. Lawrence: +241
19. Cuyahoga: +240
20. Summit: +233
21. Wayne: +226
22. Crawford: +221
23. Muskingum: +211
24. Clermont: +198
25. Nevada: +197

Top 25 Largest Negative Swings Between 2006-2010 and 2011-2015
1. Florida: -973
2. Tennessee: -817
3. Hamilton: -795
4. Logan: -634
5. Colorado: -598
6. Scioto: -508
7. Highland: -491
8. Missouri: -484
9. Lorain: -463
10. Virginia: -437
11. Darke: -320
12. Mahoning: -314
13. Champaign: -310
14. Jefferson: -301
15. Maryland: -281
16. New Mexico: -261
17. Minnesota: -249
19. Coshocton: -233
20. Washington (county): -208
21. Ashland: -202
22. Utah: -197
23. Marion: -191
24. Seneca: -181
25. Iowa: -158

Total Counts By Period
Positive Ohio Counties
2006-2010: 53
2009-2013: 57
2011-2015: 50

Positive States, including DC and Puerto Rico
2006-2010: 21
2009-2013: 24
2011-2015: 28

Total Net In-Migration
Ohio
2006-2010: +8,008
2009-2013: +11,366
2011-2015: +7,895

Outside Ohio
2006-2010: -1,158
2009-2013: -466
2011-2015: +1,598

Ohio and Outside Ohio
2006-2010: +6,850
2009-2013: +10,900
2011-2015: +9,493

All these figures show that the Columbus metro has net positive domestic migration. While the majority of that comes from within the state, Columbus’ previously negative net total from outside the state has more recently become positive as well. For a long time, Columbus’ relative success was not well-known outside of the state, but perhaps word is finally getting out.

For a lot more Columbus demographic information, check out: Columbus Demographics




The Midwest Beat the South in Regional Domestic Migration in 2016

For years, if not decades, we’ve been hearing a familiar tale- that anyone and everyone is moving from the Midwest and Northeast to the South and West. This trend began during and after the collapse of Northern manufacturing, and as higher cost of living began to make the lower-cost South more attractive in particular. However, a lot of the South’s growth over the years- indeed a majority- never had anything to do with region-to-region migration. Instead, it was due largely to natural growth (births vs. deaths) and international migration, particularly from Central America. What received all the attention, though, was the belief that people were packing up and moving to the South from places like Ohio and other struggling Northern states. While that may have been true for a while, that is increasingly looking like it is no longer the case.

The Midwest, especially, has been derided as the region no one wants to live in. Despite its growing population approaching 66 million people, the common refrain was that its colder winters, flailing economies and questionable demographic future meant that it was simply a region being left behind by the booming Southern states.

Recently, the US Census released estimates for 2015-2016 geographic mobility, and they tell a very different story altogether.

First, let’s look at the total domestic migration moving to the Midwest from other regions.
South to Midwest: +309,000
West to Midwest: +72,000
Northeast to Midwest: +61,000
Total to Midwest: +442,000

And then compare that to the total that the Midwest sends to other regions.
Midwest to South: -254,000
Midwest to West: -224,000
Midwest to Northeast: -34,000
Total from Midwest: -512,000

Net difference by region.
Midwest vs. South: +55,000
Midwest vs. West: -152,000
Midwest vs. Northeast: +27,000
Total Net: -70,000

So while the Midwest is seeing and overall net domestic migration loss, it is entirely to the Western states.

This could just be an off year, as almost all recent years showed losses to the South, but then again, maybe not. The South has been in a boom for several decades now, and in that time, the region still lags the other 3 in almost every quality of life metric used. All booms end eventually, and the South’s 2 biggest perceived advantages, low cost of living and business-friendly climate, have been gradually eroding over time. As Census surveys show, people don’t actually move for a change in weather, so it’s the economic factors that are going to make the biggest impacts long-term. The Midwest now has many cities and several states that are doing well economically, including Columbus, and perhaps they are becoming more attractive than they have in many years. Time will tell, but last year, the narrative of an unattractive Midwest vs. South was at least temporarily shelved.

2014 County Population Estimates

New county population estimates were released Thursday. Franklin County had its 2nd highest growth year since 1970 and within a few years of passing Cuyahoga County to become the most populated in Ohio.

Top 25 Largest Ohio Counties and Rank for Census 2010, July 1, 2013 and July 1, 2014
2010                                  2013                                2014
1. Cuyahoga: 1,280,122–1. Cuyahoga: 1,265,889–1. Cuyahoga: 1,259,828
2. Franklin: 1,163,414—–2. Franklin: 1,213,834——2. Franklin: 1,231,393
3. Hamilton: 802,374——3. Hamilton: 804,429——-3. Hamilton: 806,631
4. Summit: 541,781——–4. Summit: 541,787———4. Summit: 541,943
5. Montgomery: 535,153–5. Montgomery: 534,764–5. Montgomery: 533,116
6. Lucas: 441,815———-6. Lucas: 436,803———–6. Lucas: 435,286
7. Stark: 375,586———–7. Stark: 375,222————7. Stark: 375,736
8. Butler: 368,130———-8. Butler: 371,511————8. Butler: 374,158
9. Lorain: 301,356———-9. Lorain: 303,306———–9. Lorain: 304,216
10. Mahoning: 238,823—10. Mahoning: 234,336—-10. Mahoning: 233,204
11. Lake: 230,041———-11. Lake: 229,634———–11. Lake: 229,230
12. Warren: 212,693——-12. Warren: 219,578——-12. Warren: 221,659
13. Trumbull: 210,312—–13. Trumbull: 206,480——13. Trumbull: 205,175
14. Clermont: 197,363—–14. Clermont: 200,254—–14. Clermont: 201,560
15. Delaware: 174,214—-15. Delaware: 185,202—–15. Delaware: 189,113
16. Medina: 172,332——-16. Medina: 174,792——–16. Medina: 176,029
17. Licking: 166,492——–17. Licking: 168,503——–17. Licking: 169,390
18. Greene: 161,573——-18. Greene: 163,465——–18. Greene: 163,820
19. Portage: 161,419——-19. Portage: 161,423——-19. Portage: 161,882
20. Fairfield: 146,156——-20. Fairfield: 148,797——-20. Fairfield: 150,381
21. Clark: 138,333———-21. Clark: 136,803———–21. Clark: 136,554
22. Wood: 125,488———22. Wood: 129,209———-22. Wood: 129,590
23. Richland: 124,475—–23. Richland: 122,292——23. Richland: 121,942
24. Wayne: 114,520——-24. Wayne: 115,144———24. Wayne: 115,537
25. Columbiana: 107,841–25. Columbiana: 105,885–25. Columbiana: 105,686

Top 25 Counties with the Largest Numerical Growth, July 1, 2013 to July 1, 2014
1. Franklin: +17,559
2. Delaware: +3,911
3. Butler: +2,647
4. Hamilton: +2,202
5. Warren: +2,081
6. Fairfield: +1,584
7. Clermont: +1,306
8. Lorain: +1,210
9. Licking: +887
10. Madison: +646
11. Stark: +514
12. Miami: +484
13. Portage: +459
14. Pickaway: +410
15. Union: +396
16. Wayne: +393
17. Wood: +381
18. Greene: +355
19. Knox: +244
20. Holmes: +236
21. Geauga: +236
22. Athens: +198
23. Fulton: +162
24. Summit: +156
25. Muskingum: +122

Top 25 Counties with the Largest Numerical Growth, Census 2010 to July 1, 2014
1. Franklin: +67,850
2. Delaware: +14,924
3. Warren: +8,791
4. Butler: +6,028
5. Hamilton: +4,257
6. Fairfield: +4,229
7. Clermont: +4,197
8. Wood: +4,102
9. Medina: +3,696
10. Licking: +2,906
11. Lorain: +2,860
12. Greene: +2,251
13. Holmes: +1,532
14. Union: +1,509
15. Miami: +1,394
16. Pickaway: +1,178
17. Wayne: +1,023
18. Geauga: +885
19. Hancock: +555
20. Madison: +488
21. Portage: +461
22. Morrow: +325
23. Knox: +237
24. Tuscarawas: +206
25. Summit: +157

Top 25 Counties for Total Birth July 1, 2013 to July 1, 2014
1. Franklin: 18,595
2. Cuyahoga: 14,801
3. Hamilton: 11,009
4. Montgomery: 6,708
5. Summit: 6,235
6. Lucas: 5,742
7. Butler: 4,572
8. Stark: 4,106
9. Lorain: 3,340
10. Warren: 2,396
11. Mahoning: 2,369
12. Clermont: 2,357
13. Lake: 2,204
14. Delaware: 2,119
15. Trumbull: 2,070
16. Licking: 1,948
17. Greene: 1,757
18. Medina: 1,732
19. Fairfield: 1,647
20. Clark: 1,567
21. Wayne: 1,501
22. Richland: 1,413
23. Wood: 1,370
24. Portage: 1,369
25. Allen: 1,288

Top 25 Counties for Total Deaths July 1, 2013 to July 1, 2014

1. Cuyahoga: 13,316
2. Franklin: 9,197
3. Hamilton: 7,718
4. Montgomery: 5,632
5. Summit: 5,595
6. Lucas: 4,365
7. Stark: 3,910
8. Butler: 3,186
9. Mahoning: 2,957
10. Trumbull: 2,407
11. Lake: 2,366
12. Warren: 1,636
13. Clark: 1,631
14. Clermont: 1,574
15. Licking: 1,505
16. Medina: 1,352
17. Greene: 1,350
18. Portage: 1,329
19. Richland: 1,313
20. Fairfield: 1,233
21. Columbiana: 1,140
22. Ashtabula: 1,092
23. Allen: 1,063
24. Wayne: 1,055
25. Delaware: 1,019

Top 25 Counties for Total Natural Change (Births vs. Deaths) July 1, 2013 to July 1, 2014

1. Franklin: 9,398
2. Hamilton: 3,291
3. Cuyahoga: 1,481
4. Lucas: 1,377
5. Butler: 1,386
6. Delaware: 1,100
7. Montgomery: 1,076
8. Clermont: 783
9. Warren: 760
10. Summit: 640
11. Lorain: 546
12. Holmes: 506
13. Wayne: 446
14. Licking: 443
15. Fairfield: 414
16. Greene: 407
17. Medina: 380
18. Wood: 359
19. Union: 271
20. Hancock: 249
21. Allen: 225
22. Shelby: 212
23. Geauga: 199
24. Stark: 196
25. Huron: 165

Metro Comparison- 2nd Annual Edition

Last summer, I compared the Columbus metro with its national peers, a collection of metros ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 million in population. You can see that comparison here: http://allcolumbusdata.com/?p=661 and here: http://allcolumbusdata.com/?p=678

The recent release of updated population numbers prompted the need for an updated look. I focused on population density previously. This time, I wanted to expand that focus to include migration trends.

Metro Area Population on July 1, 2012 and July 1, 2013 By Rank
2012——————-2013
1. Pittsburgh: 2,360,989— 1. Pittsburgh: 2,360,867
2. Charlotte: 2,294,990—2. Charlotte: 2,335,358
3. Portland, OR: 2,289,038—3. Portland, OR: 2,314,554
4. San Antonio, TX: 2,234,494—4. San Antonio, TX: 2,277,550
5. Orlando: 2,223,456—5. Orlando: 2,267,846
6. Sacramento, CA: 2,193,927—6. Sacramento, CA: 2,215,770
7. Cincinnati: 2,129,309—7. Cincinnati: 2,137,406
8. Cleveland: 2,064,739—8. Cleveland: 2,064,725
9. Kansas City: 2,038,690—9. Kansas City: 2,054,473
10. Las Vegas: 1,997,659—10. Las Vegas: 2,027,868
11. Columbus: 1,944,937—11. Columbus: 1,967,066
12. Indianapolis: 1,929,207—12. Indianapolis: 1,953,961
13. San Jose, CA: 1,892,894—13. San Jose, CA: 1,919,641
14. Austin, TX: 1,835,110— 14. Austin, TX: 1,883,051
15. Nashville: 1,726,759—15. Nashville: 1,757,912
16. Virginia Beach, VA: 1,698,410—16. Virginia Beach, VA: 1,707,369
17. Providence, RI: 1,601,160—17. Providence, RI: 1,604,291
18. Milwaukee: 1,566,182—18. Milwaukee: 1,569,659

Total Metro Population Change, 2012-2013, By Rank
1. Austin: +47,941
2. Orlando: +44,390
3. San Antonio: +43,056
4. Charlotte: +40,368
5. Nashville: +31,153
6. Las Vegas: +30,209
7. San Jose: +26,747
8. Portland: +25,516
9. Indianapolis: +24,754
10. Columbus: +22,129
11. Sacramento: +21,843
12. Kansas City: +15,783
13. Virginia Beach: +8,959
14. Cincinnati: +8,097
15. Milwaukee: +3,477
16. Providence: +3,131
17. Cleveland: -14
18. Pittsburgh: -122

Average Annual Population Change from 2000-2010 vs. 2010-2013
2000-2010—————-2010-2013
1. Charlotte: +88,657— 1. Austin: +55,587
2. Las Vegas: +57,550— 2. San Antonio: +45,014
3. Orlando: +48,985— 3. Orlando: +44,478
4. Austin: +46,653— 4. Charlotte: +39,447
5. San Antonio: +43,081— 5. Portland: +29,515
6. Indianapolis: +36,277— 6. Nashville: +29,007
7. Nashville: +35,910— 7. San Jose: +27,577
8. Sacramento: +35,227— 8. Las Vegas: +25,553
9. Portland: +29,819— 9. Sacramento: +22,214
10. Columbus: +28,928— 10. Indianapolis: +22,028
11. Kansas City: +17,330— 11. Columbus: +21,697
12. Cincinnati: +10,495— 12. Kansas City: +15,134
13. San Jose: +10,109— 13. Virginia Beach: +10.182
14. Virginia Beach: +10,045— 14. Cincinnati: +7,609
15. Milwaukee: +5,517— 15. Milwaukee: +4,584
16. Providence: +1,846— 16. Pittsburgh: +1,527
17. Cleveland: -7,090— 17. Providence: +1,146
18. Pittsburgh: -7,480— 18. Cleveland: -4,172

Annual Growth Rate % Change 2000-2010 vs. 2010-2013**
1. San Jose: +172.8%
2. Pittsburgh: +120.4%
3. Cleveland: +69.9%
4. Austin: +19.1%
5. San Antonio: +4.5%
6. Virginia Beach: +1.4%
7. Portland: -1.0%
8. Orlando: -9.2%
9. Kansas City: -12.7%
10. Milwaukee: -16.9%
11. Nashville: -19.2%
12. Columbus: -25.0%
13. Cincinnati: -27.5%
14. Sacramento: -36.9%
15. Providence: -37.9%
16. Indianapolis: -39.3%
17. Charlotte: -55.5%
18. Las Vegas: -55.6%

**Some of the changes in rates are due to boundary changes.  For example, part of the growth rate for Columbus 2000-2010 was a retroactive population addition when boundaries were changed in 2013.  The actual growth rate changed very little. 

Metro Area Density 2012 vs. 2013
2012——2013
1. Cleveland: 1,033.3—Cleveland: 1,033.9
2. Providence: 978.8— 2. Providence: 980.6
3. Milwaukee: 859.6— 3. Milwaukee: 861.0
4. San Jose: 702.9— 4. San Jose: 712.3
5. Virginia Beach: 642.2— 5. Orlando: 649.6
6. Orlando: 637.0—  6. Virginia Beach: 645.0
7. Cincinnati: 484.4— 7. Cincinnati: 486.4
8. Indianapolis: 444.4— 8. Charlotte: 450.8
9. Charlotte: 443.4— 9. Indianapolis: 450.1
10. Austin: 428.6—-  10. Austin: 440.0
11. Pittsburgh: 413.7—  11. Pittsburgh: 413.8
12. Columbus: 400.8— 12. Columbus: 405.6
13. Portland: 335.9— 13. Portland: 339.5
14. Sacramento: 316.7— 14. Sacramento: 319.5
15. San Antonio: 302.4— 15. San Antonio: 308.3
16. Kansas City: 276.5— 16. Kansas City: 278.6
17. Nashville: 270.7— 17. Nashville: 275.6
18. Las Vegas: 247.3— 18. Las Vegas: 250.6

Total Births 2012 vs. 2013
2012————2013
1. San Antonio: +31,045— 1. San Antonio: +31,527
2. Kansas City: +28,087— 2. Kansas City: +27,937
3. Cincinnati: +27,803— 3. Sacramento: +27,865
4. Portland: +27,683— 4. Portland: +27,762
5. Sacramento: +27,649— 5. Cincinnati: +27,545
6. Orlando: +27,165— 6. Orlando: +27,484
7. Las Vegas: +26,385— 7. Las Vegas: +26,616
8. Columbus: +25,904— 8. Columbus: +25,740
9. Indianapolis: +25,472— 9. Austin: +25,519
10. Austin: +25,015 — 10. Indianapolis: +25,507
11. Charlotte: +24,415— 11. Charlotte: +24,437
12. San Jose: +24,240— 12. San Jose: +24,386
13. Pittsburgh: +24,006— 13. Pittsburgh: +23,938
14. Cleveland: +23,227— 14. Cleveland: +23,204
15. Virginia Beach: +22,799— 15. Virginia Beach: +22,773
16. Nashville: +21,641— 16. Nashville: +21,714
17. Milwaukee: +20,125— 17. Milwaukee: +19,963
18. Providence: +16,761— 18. Providence: +16,668

Total Deaths 2012 vs. 2013
2012————-2013
1. Austin: -8,732— 1. Austin: -8,859
2. San Jose: -9,965— 2. San Jose: -10,319
3. Nashville: -12,187— 3. Nashville: -12,327
4. Charlotte: -12,241— 4. Charlotte: -12,396
5. Virginia Beach: -12,801— 5. Milwaukee: -12,856
6. Milwaukee: -12,836— 6. Virginia Beach: -13,094
7. Indianapolis: -13,520— 7. Indianapolis: -13,414
8. Columbus: -13,938— 8. Columbus: -14,118
9. Las Vegas: -14,311— 9. Providence: -14,387
10. Providence: -14,568— 10. Las Vegas: -14,462
11. San Antonio: -15,367— 11. San Antonio: -15,593
12. Orlando: -15,419— 12. Orlando: -15,882
13. Sacramento: -15,973— 13. Sacramento: -16,133
14. Portland: -16,013— 14. Portland: -16,155
15. Kansas City: -16,255— 15. Kansas City: -16,254
16. Cincinnati: -18,477— 16. Cincinnati: -18,490
17. Cleveland: -20,708— 17. Cleveland: -20,326
18. Pittsburgh: -27,310— 18. Pittsburgh: -27,070

Net Natural Growth (Births vs. Deaths) 2012 vs. 2013
2012—————–2013
1. Austin: +16,283— 1. Austin: +16,660
2. San Antonio: +15,678— 2. San Antonio: +15,934
3. San Jose: +14,275— 3. San Jose: +14,067
4. Charlotte: +12,174—  4. Las Vegas: +11,622
5. Las Vegas: +12,074— 5. Indianapolis: +12,093
6. Columbus: +11,966— 6. Charlotte: +12,041
7. Indianapolis: +11,952— 7. Sacramento: +11,732
8. Kansas City: +11,862— 8. Kansas City: +11,683
9. Orlando: +11,746— 9. Columbus: +11,622
10. Sacramento: +11,676— 10. Portland: +11,607
11. Portland: +11,670— 11. Orlando: +11,602
12. Virginia Beach: +9,998— 12. Virginia Beach: +9,679
13. Nashville: +9,454— 13. Nashville: +9,387
14. Cincinnati: +9,326— 14. Cincinnati: +9,055
15. Milwaukee: +7,289— 15. Milwaukee: +7,107
16. Cleveland: +2,519— 16. Cleveland: +2,878
17. Providence: +2,193— 17. Providence; +2,281
18. Pittsburgh: -3,310— 18. Pittsburgh: -3,132

Domestic In-Migration 2012 vs. 2013
2012—————2013
1. Austin: +31,041— 1. Austin: +25,908
2. Orlando: +22,667— 2. San Antonio: +22,392
3. San Antonio: +21,908— 3. Charlotte: +21,382
4. Charlotte: +18,000— 4. Nashville: +17,975
5. Nashville: +14,946— 5. Orlando: +17,316
6. Las Vegas: +12,315— 6. Las Vegas: +10,524
7. Portland: +11,767— 7. Indianapolis: +8,934
8. Indianapolis: +4,146— 8. Portland: +7,901
9. Columbus: +3,275— 9. Columbus: +5,749
10. Pittsburgh: +1,963— 10. Sacramento: +3,329
11. Sacramento: +1,302— 11. Kansas City: +771
12. Kansas City: -1,061— 12. Pittsburgh: +590
13. San Jose: -2,304— 13. San Jose: -1,397
14. Milwaukee: -4,291— 14. Providence: -3,721
15. Providence: -5,210— 15. Cincinnati: -3,894
16. Virginia Beach: -5,950— 16. Cleveland: -5,581
17. Cincinnati: -6,024— 17. Milwaukee: -5,663
18. Cleveland: -9,990— 18. Virginia Beach: -5,920

International In-Migration 2012 vs. 2013
2012————–2013
1. Orlando: +14,506— 1. Orlando: +14,725
2. San Jose: +13,728— 2. San Jose: +14,124
3. Virginia Beach: +7,562— 3. Las Vegas: +6,506
4. Las Vegas: +6,606— 4. Sacramento: +6,071
5. Sacramento: +5,921— 5. Austin: +5,322
6. Austin: +5,199— 6. Portland: +5,280
7. Portland: +5,109— 7. Virginia Beach: +5,037
8. Columbus: +4,654— 8. Charlotte: +4,996
9. Providence: +4,637— 9. Columbus: +4,689
10. Charlotte: +4,573— 10. Providence: +4,563
11. San Antonio: +4,441— 11. Indianapolis: +4,064
12. Indianapolis: +3,958— 12. Cleveland: +3,698
13. Cleveland: +3,647— 13. San Antonio: +3,469
14. Nashville: +3,305— 14. Nashville: +3,463
15. Cincinnati: +3,268— 15. Cincinnati: +3,326
16. Kansas City: +3,164— 16. Kansas City: +3,119
17. Pittsburgh: +2,767— 17. Pittsburgh: +2,778
18. Milwaukee: +2,179— 18. Milwaukee: +2,233

Net In-Migration Total 2012 vs. 2013
2012—————-2013
1. Orlando: +37,173— 1. Orlando: +32,041
2. Austin: +36,240— 2. Austin: +31,230
3. San Antonio: +25,949— 3. Charlotte: +26,378
4. Charlotte: +22,573— 4. San Antonio: +25,861
5. Las Vegas: +18,921— 5. Nashville: +21,428
6. Nashville: +18,251— 6. Las Vegas: +17,030
7. Portland: +16,876— 7. Portland: +13,181
8. San Jose: +11,424— 8. Indianapolis: +12,998
9. Indianapolis: +8,104— 9. San Jose: +12,727
10. Columbus: +7,929— 10. Columbus: +10,438
11. Sacramento: +7,223— 11. Sacramento: +9,400
12. Pittsburgh: +4,730— 12. Kansas City: +3,890
13. Kansas City: +2,103— 13. Pittsburgh: +3,368
14. Virginia Beach: +1,612— 14. Providence: +842
15. Providence: -573— 15. Cincinnati: -568
16. Milwaukee: -2,112— 16. Virginia Beach: -883
17. Cincinnati: -2,756— 17. Cleveland: -1,883
18. Cleveland: -6,343— 18. Milwaukee: -3,430