Cool Link of the Day: NWS Wilmington’s Winter Weather Page

Given today’s 4-6″ of snow and ice, I thought it’d be good to give this link: NWS ILN Winter

This link provides information on radar, snow chances, current conditions, etc.

Also, check out the historic weather records for February here: February Weather

This link gives data on February weather from 1879 through 2017, and includes records on snowfall, cold, heat, rainfall, etc., along with charts giving historic averages by decade.

2014: Year in Review- February

Development
February was not a super busy month for residential development, as is often the case during the dead of winter, but still offered plenty to be excited about.
-Local business Café Brioso announced plans to expand to Franklinton, in another showing of the newfound popularity of the the downtrodden neighborhood. http://www.columbusunderground.com/cafe-brioso-expanding-to-east-franklinton-cw2014
-Strongwater Food and Spirits opened up in Franklinton as well.
http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/business/2014/02/11/dining-spot-emerges-in-young-arts-complex.html
-Work continued on revitalizing the long-declined Metro West apartment complex on the West Side behind Westland Mall.
http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2014/02/11/demolition-of-408-metro-west-apartment.html
-A new 4-story, 16-unit apartment building was first proposed for 40-42 W. 3rd Avenue in Victorian Village. As part of the development, the 19th century home on the site would be renovated as well. The site is here: http://goo.gl/maps/y5M1I
-The first renderings for the 7-story, multi-building Hubbard Park Place project in Victorian Village were released here: http://www.columbusunderground.com/wood-companies-unveils-hubbard-park-place-renderings-bw1
-And we heard about the task force that would begin a study to determine the feasibility of a Downtown-Port Columbus passenger rail line. Yay! http://www.columbusunderground.com/new-task-force-will-explore-airport-downtown-rail-connection
-Also on the transportation end, Lyft announced it would begin car-sharing service in Columbus. http://www.columbusunderground.com/lyft-launching-in-columbus-bw1
-Dublin’s Bridge Street Corridor plan got another boost with the announcement of the 392-unit Tuller Flats residential development. http://www.columbusunderground.com/castos-bridge-street-district-proposal-calls-for-392-units-bw1

Economy/Other
-It was announced that 2013 had been a busy year in terms of housing construction.
http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/business/2014/02/05/central-ohio-builders-were-busier-in-2013.html
-The Columbus Metro posted an unemployment rate for the month at 5.5%, down half a point from January and down 1.1 points from February 2013.

Weather
February continued the historic winter of 2013-2014. The 15.9″ of snow that fell during the month was the 6th snowiest on record, and the 7.1″ that fell on the 4th was the 7th highest daily February total since 1879. Even more, the 7.1″ daily was part of a 2-day single storm that produced the 3rd largest February snowstorm at 10.6″.
Temperatures for the month were also cold, coming in 6.9 degrees below normal. This was the 20th coldest February of all time.

February 2010 Snowstorms x4 Part #2




February 2010’s second snowstorm came just 3 days after the major event on the 5th-6th. This second low pressure system tracked from Louisville, Kentucky and then up along I-71 to Cleveland. Even though the track was through the heart of the state, the majority of the precipitation in most areas was snowfall. This storm followed so closely on the heels of the February 5th storm that the cold air it had brought down was still in place on the 9th. This allowed for snow despite the far north track.

Snow began in Columbus in the early morning hours of the 5th and continued into the 6th. Snowfall rates reached their peak in the late morning hours of the 5th, falling at 1/2″ per hour at times, but never quite reached the intensities of Storm #1. While some parts of the state had 7-8″, the Columbus area had 5-6″, about half of what it got in Storm #1. Still, cleanup from the first storm was still ongoing, and this latest snowfall severely complicated the process. Traffic and airport delays were common, and many schools were cancelled. Snow depths in Franklin County reached 10-16″ after the storm.

For a look at February 2010’s first storm, go here: February 5-6, 2010
For more February weather records, go here: February Weather
For more general weather records, go here: Columbus All-Time Weather




February 2010- Snowstorms x4 Part #1




The winter of 2009-2010 will go down as one of the best ever (if you like winter, that is). The biggest reason for that is February 2010.

Snowstorm #1: February 5-6, 2010

The first event started in the morning on February 5th. Forecasts in the days leading up to this event were mixed. Models were showing a lot of precipitation, but also a strong push of upper-level warm air into Ohio. How far north this warm layer reached was the point of contention. In most years, the WTOD, or the “Warm Tongue of Death” as some Ohio weather enthusiasts like to refer to it, is a constant threat each and every winter. When a storm is moving north or northeast south of the state, they tend to pull warm air north, and the Appalachian Mountains act like a funnel directing this warm air straight into Ohio. During winter events, it presents itself as a layer of warm air above the surface, often turning snow to ice, sleet or just plain rain, even if the surface itself is relatively cold. It’s a constant source of frustration for winter weather lovers. It was this phenomenon that was predicted to strike again and the dividing line, as it so often is, was predicted to be along I-70. North of there, mostly or all snow was predicted, while south was more mix, ice and rain. The I-70 corridor, including Columbus, was to be the northern extent of this mixing, limiting snowfall accumulations. Still, even with the mix predicted, a solid 4-6″ was predicted, which is a decent event by itself and about typical for any winter.

Precipitation began as snow across southern counties by dawn and spread north, reaching the Columbus area between 9 and 9:30AM. It started out as flurries, but the flakes were already fairly large. Within 15 minutes, the flurries had turned to very heavy, wet snow. Flakes were as large as quarters at times and stayed large, accumulating quickly despite the above freezing temperatures. Visibility quickly dropped to a half mile or less at times, and traffic quickly snarled with accidents as plows could not keep up with the pace of the inch-per-hour snowfall rates. Between 4PM and 5PM, there was a respite as snowfall lightened and there was a mix of sleet and ice pellets, but all snow resumed once heavier precipitation moved in, concluding the only and very short period of mixing I-70 had. Snow continued through the night of the 5th and into the 6th, finally ending before noon.

Snowfall totals were impressive, especially along and north of I-70, where little mixing took place, but also in pockets to the southeast of Columbus, like Lancaster. For Columbus, the 9.9″ that fell was good enough to be a top 15 largest snowfall for the city. It would not, however, be the largest snowfall of the month.

Greenville: 14.8″
Lancaster: 13.0″
Akron: 12.1″
Bellefontaine: 12.0″
Urbana: 12.0″
Westerville: 11.4″
Dayton: 11.1″
Springfield: 11.0″
Columbus: 9.9″
Youngstown: 8.4″
Delaware: 8.0″
Cleveland: 5.9″
Cincinnati: 4.5″
Circleville: 3.0″
Toledo: 3.0″

Snowfall for February 5-6, 2010

For February 2010’s 2nd storm, go here: February 9-10, 2010
For more February weather records, go here: February Weather
For more general weather records, go here: Columbus All-Time Weather