2012 Development Projects Completed

Major Projects Completed in 2012

1. Downtown Hilton Hotel
This was a 12-story, 532 room hotel built on a surface lot directly across from the Columbus Convention Center. It was built at a cost of about $150 million and took about 18 months to complete. Along with the hotel, a glass skywalk was added connecting the hotel to the convention center. Here is the link to their website that contains rate information along with a photo gallery: http://www.hiltoncolumbusdowntown.com/default-en.html

2. Nationwide’s Office Building
Built at the corner of North Front and West Nationwide Blvd on a surface lot, this was a $26 million, 5-story office building built to allow Nationwide to bring back 1,000 workers from the suburbs. Along with the building, a pocket park with paths was installed connecting High Street with the building. Follow the construction of this building here: http://www.columbusunderground.com/forums/topic/nationwide-building-5-story-office-building-at-front-and-nationwide

3. Columbus Casino
This $400 million casino was built on the former Delphi Plant site at West Broad and Georgesville Road. It is the largest casino in Ohio and opened in October. Find out more here: http://www.hollywoodcolumbus.com/

4. Nationwide Children’s Hospital Expansion
The hospital added a 12-story tower along with a parking garage and research center along Parsons Avenue just outside of Downtown. The $840 million project allowed NCH to become the 2nd largest pediatrics center in the country. Follow its construction here: http://www.columbusunderground.com/forums/topic/nationwide-childrens-hospital-news-discussion

5. Rich Street Bridge
The new Rich Street Bridge replaced the one on Town Street. It was the second new bridge to span the Scioto River after the Main Street Bridge opened in 2011. Both connect Downtown to Franklinton. The $32 million bridge opened in July.

Completed Project #3- 2001- Polaris Fashion Place

Polaris Fashion Place
The rush to the suburbs had been going on for the better part of 60 years by the late 1990s, and seemed to show no real signs of ending. Although the 1990s had been somewhat of an improvement over previous decades for cities and urban life, suburbia was still by far the expected destination for most. Sprawl had exploded during the 1990s and most suburbs had experiened record growth. Southern Delaware county, especially, saw massive building as the population there climbed quickly. Polaris Fashion Place was built to take advantage of the suburban trends. Built largely on farmland, Polaris was to be one of the largest malls in the state and offer high-end fashion names like Lord & Taylor and Saks Fifth Avenue. Planning began in the mid-1990s and construction began in 1999, finishing up in 2001…and just in time. Polaris is one of the last enclosed malls built in the entire United States, as they quickly fell out of favor once the town-center concept, like Easton, became popular. Malls, and retail in general, also suffered from the double recessions during the 2000s. Polaris itself continues to be a popular mall, and development in the area, while not quite at the same pace, has continued.

Polaris Fashion Place Stats

Start of Construction: 1999
Opened: 2001
Current Status: Complete
Cost: $200 Million
# of Stores: 200

From this 1995 aerial, the Polaris site is just one big farm.  I-71 is on the right, but otherwise there are almost no roads through the area.

From this 1995 aerial, the Polaris site is just one big farm. I-71 is on the right, but otherwise there are almost no roads through the area.

Fast forward to 2002 and suddenly the farms are gone.  A new exit off 71 is Polaris Parkway.

Fast forward to 2002 and suddenly the farms are gone. A new exit off 71 is Polaris Parkway.

The Polaris area has continued to add new development through this 2011 aerial.

The Polaris area has continued to add new development through this 2011 aerial.

Completed Project #2- 2000- Miranova

On November 16, 1995, Developer Ron Pizzuti announced plans for a residential and office complex on the Scioto River shore on the southwestern edge of Downtown. In 1995, this area was a large vacant lot and a handful of small buildings. Originally, the $150 million plan called for replacing this whole area with two 25-story condominium towers, 14 luxury townhomes on the river, a 5-story office building and a pair of restaurants, all with construction to begin in 1996. 200 residential units were planned for the towers. This was all supposed to be part of a new series of Downtown developments including a new COSI, a new soccer stadium across the river on the Scioto Peninsula and a residential development on the Whittier Peninsula west of the Brewery District.

On May 12th, 1996, it was reported that the project would not actually break ground until sometime in 1997, already another year later than originally planned. The two towers remained on the agenda, as did the townhomes and restaurants, but the office building had gained a floor and would now be 6 stories.

By July 8th, 1996, the project had gotten larger still. The # of townhomes had more than doubled to 30 and the office building had risen to 7 stories.

On December 16, 1996, the office building once again grew, this time to 8 stories.

By February 4, 1997, the number of towers had fallen to just one, and mention of townhomes had disappeared, yet the price tag remained $150 million.

Further changes came on December 12, 1997. The single tower would be 28 stories and the office tower had grown to 16 stories. Groundbreaking was pushed back to sometime in 1998.

February 11, 1998, still a single 28 story condo tower, but now two 16-story office towers.

May 8, 1998, and back to just one office tower. Still no groundbreaking.

September 19, 1998, more changes. Condo tower down to 26 stories and the office building down to 15. But work has begun on pouring foundations.

Rendering of the Miranova project in 1998.

Miranova condo tower was completed in the early spring of 2000. By July, 79 of the 112 condos had sold. The office building, down to a final height of 12 stories, would not be finished until 2001. The last condo sale would not happen for several years, as the 2000s saw the market crash for these residences.

Miranova Project Stats
Began Construction in 1999
Completed in 2001
Cost: $150 Million
Height: 26 Stories
# of Residential Units: 112

Photo of 1 and 2 Miranova Place.  The photo also shows the old Main Street bridge prior to the construction of the Scioto Mile park.

Photo of 1 and 2 Miranova Place. The photo also shows the old Main Street bridge prior to the construction of the Scioto Mile park.

Completed Project #1- 2011- National Road Condos

The Olde Towne East neighborhood, especially along E. Main Street, has long been in the sights of developers and urban revitalization advocates. Gentrification began in the early 1980s, but for the most part, occurred structure by structure, so it was only very gradually that the area changed. That has changed somewhat in recent years with more investment from larger sources, such as the collaboration between Ohio State and the City to invest millions in infrastructure and housing improvements. Larger-scale developers have also stepped into the game. National Road Condos was one of those types of investments.

Located at 1023-1059 E. Main Street, 4 19th century homes as well as a commercial building were renovated. The 4 homes had been abandoned for decades and the commercial building was mostly empty, save for a small convenience store. After many months of work, all five buildings emerged as updated gems in a neighborhood growing with them. 8 new residential units, all condos, were opened up and the commercial building gained new tenants. While certainly not the largest project completed in the neighborhood, it does represent the potential of the Near East Side neighborhoods and their abundance of great housing stock just waiting for new life.

Project Stats
Began Construction: 2010
End of Construction: 2011
Cost: $3.5 Million
# of Units: 8

Some great before and after photos of the project.

1023-1025 E. Main is the westernmost house.  Here is the BEFORE photo.

1023-1025 E. Main is the westernmost house. Here is the BEFORE photo.


1023-1025 E. Main AFTER

1023-1025 E. Main AFTER


379 S. Ohio Avenue BEFORE.  The easternmost house and in very poor condition.

379 S. Ohio Avenue BEFORE. The easternmost house and in very poor condition.


879 S. Ohio Avenue AFTER.  Huge difference.  Even the lot at Ohio and E. Main has been cleaned up.

879 S. Ohio Avenue AFTER. Huge difference. Even the lot at Ohio and E. Main has been cleaned up.


1051. E. Main Commercial building BEFORE.

1051. E. Main Commercial building BEFORE.


1051 E. Main Commercial building AFTER..

1051 E. Main Commercial building AFTER..