Columbus City Diversity and Comparison to Peers




In the 2nd post related to the recently-released Census demographic data, I’ll look at city diversity and how it’s been changing since 2005.

Rank by City of Total White, non-Hispanic Population by Year
2005————————————–2010————————————-2017

1. Chicago, IL: 819,215————1. Chicago: 853,910—————1. Chicago: 879,334
2. Indianapolis, IN: 491,044——2. Indianapolis: 482,195———–2. Columbus: 490,149
3. Columbus: 442,958————-3. Columbus: 470,971————-3. Indianapolis: 468,665
4. Portland, OR: 382,033———-4. Portland: 417,876—————4. Austin: 453,801
5. San Antonio, TX: 356,420—–5. Austin: 384,065——————5. Portland: 452,132
6. Austin, TX: 347,013————-6. San Antonio: 351,420———6. San Antonio: 375,463
7. Nashville, TN: 314,518——–7. Nashville: 339,030————–7. Nashville: 368,195
8. Charlotte, NC: 302,789——-8. Charlotte: 331,357—————8. Charlotte: 360,270
9. Virginia Beach, VA: 290,891–9. Virginia Beach: 282,812——9. Omaha: 311,349
10. San Jose, CA: 281,822—–10. Las Vegas: 280,604———–10. Las Vegas: 280,201
11. Las Vegas, NV: 281,679—-11. Omaha: 277,606———–11. Virginia Beach: 277,338
12. Omaha, NE: 267,685——–12. San Jose: 265,311————12. Kansas City: 272,548
13. Kansas City, MO: 249,123—13. Kansas City: 247,473——13. San Jose: 267,315
14. Wichita, KS: 245,527———-14. Wichita: 245,146————14. Minneapolis: 252,304
15. Milwaukee, WI: 219,891——15. Minneapolis: 242,848——15. Wichita: 243,143
16. Minneapolis, MN: 216,975—16. Milwaukee: 221,514——–16. Lincoln: 226,297
17. Lincoln, NE: 197,287———-17. Lincoln: 216,076————-17. Milwaukee: 207,043
18. Toledo: 183,746—————-18. Pittsburgh: 203,622———18. Pittsburgh: 196,687
19. Pittsburgh, PA: 180,725——19. Fort Wayne: 179,646——-19. Madison: 187,566
20. Madison, WI: 161,631——–20. Madison: 178,307————20. Fort Wayne: 166,912
21. St. Paul, MN: 161,329——–21. Toledo: 177,341————–21. Toledo: 164,104
22. Sacramento, CA: 160,599—22. Sacramento: 165,610——22. Sacramento: 159,291
23. Fort Wayne, IN: 157,672—–23. St. Paul: 159,704———–23. St. Paul: 152,558
24. Des Moines, IA: 149,786—–24. Des Moines: 145,937——24. Cincinnati: 143,028
25. Cleveland: 147,359———–25. Cincinnati: 143,120———25. Des Moines: 137,235
26. St. Louis, MO: 143,590——26. Cleveland: 137,977———26. St. Louis: 134,471
27. Cincinnati: 138,486———–27. St. Louis: 134,146———–27. Cleveland: 126,714
28. Akron: 128,976—————-28. Akron: 120,800————–28. Grand Rapids: 114,349
29. Grand Rapids, MI: 113,791—29. Grand Rapids: 104,636—29. Akron: 113,951
30. Orlando, FL: 92,326———–30. Orlando: 96,867————-30. Orlando: 95,876
31. Detroit, MI: 77,163————-31. Dayton: 72,663————–31. Dayton: 71,094
32. Dayton: 67,581—————–32. Providence: 64,284——–32. Detroit: 70,931
33. Providence, RI: 64,223——-33. Detroit: 55,298————–33. Providence: 59,321

Columbus moved from 3rd to 2nd over the period.

Rank by City of Total Black, non-Hispanic Population by Year
2005—————————————–2010———————————2017

1. Chicago: 938,097—————–1. Chicago: 895,294———–1. Chicago: 797,253
2. Detroit: 683,999——————–2. Detroit: 587,707————-2. Detroit: 529,593
3. Milwaukee: 222,040————–3. Charlotte: 251,274———-3. Charlotte: 292,104
4. Cleveland: 221,797—————4. Milwaukee: 230,473——–4. Columbus: 248,476
5. Charlotte: 205,216—————-5. Indianapolis: 226,314——-5. Indianapolis: 236,606
6. Indianapolis: 193,948————6. Columbus: 216,486———6. Milwaukee: 228,720
7. Columbus: 179,197—————7. Cleveland: 208,528———7. Cleveland: 186,073
8. St. Louis: 168,768—————-8. Nashville: 171,104———–8. Nashville: 180,830
9. Nashville: 148,051—————-9. St. Louis: 157,382———–9. St. Louis: 143,761
10. Kansas City: 131,694———-10. Kansas City: 138,461—–10. Kansas City: 138,346
11. Cincinnati: 131,010————-11. Cincinnati: 131,909——–11. Cincinnati: 127,589
12. Pittsburgh: 81,758————–12. Virginia Beach: 79,583—-12. San Antonio: 97,925
13. Virginia Beach: 80,004——–13. San Antonio: 79,307——13. Virginia Beach: 82,181
14. Orlando: 73,736—————–14. Toledo: 75,033————-14. Minneapolis: 75,006
15. Toledo: 72,190——————-15. Pittsburgh: 71,539——–15. Toledo: 74,906
16. Sacramento: 71,452————16. Orlando: 70,988————16. Orlando: 72,796
17. San Antonio: 70,723————17. Minneapolis: 63,749——17. Austin: 69,860
18. Dayton: 60,196——————-18. Sacramento: 61,976——18. Sacramento: 67,305
19. Akron: 59,810——————–19. Austin: 61,833————–19. Las Vegas: 65,663
20. Las Vegas: 59,780————–20. Dayton: 61,402————-20. Pittsburgh: 65,268
21. Austin: 59,583——————-21. Akron: 60,653—————-21. Akron: 61,461
22. Minneapolis: 57,499————22. Las Vegas: 60,187———22. Dayton: 57,043
23. Omaha: 50,333——————23. Omaha: 55,086————-23. Omaha: 56,098
24. Grand Rapids: 40,408———24. Wichita: 42,662————-24. St. Paul: 51,737
25. Wichita: 39,165—————–25. Grand Rapids: 41,848—–25. Wichita: 40,756
26. Fort Wayne: 35,221———–26. St. Paul: 41,923————-26. Grand Rapids: 38,130
27. St. Paul: 34,903—————-27. Fort Wayne: 39,016——–27. Fort Wayne: 37,941
28. Portland: 30,828—————28. Portland: 37,355————28. Portland: 34,624
29. San Jose: 27,446————–29. San Jose: 29,831———-29. San Jose: 28,126
30. Providence: 18,794———–30. Des Moines: 19,962——-30. Providence: 27,274
31. Des Moines: 16,709———-31. Providence: 19,265——–31. Des Moines: 22,170
32. Madison: 12,660————–32. Madison: 17,560————32. Madison: 14,185
33. Lincoln: 7,082——————33. Lincoln: 9,023—————33. Lincoln: 11,487

Columbus moved up from 7th to 4th in total Black, non-Hispanic during the period. Surprisingly, quite a few cities have actually been losing this demographic since 2010 at least.

Rank by City of Total Asian, non-Hispanic Population by Year
2005————————————-2010——————————————2017

1. San Jose: 269,186————–1. San Jose: 303,227—————–1. San Jose: 366,134
2. Chicago: 127,686—————-2. Chicago: 148,280——————2. Chicago: 179,176
3. Sacramento: 80,307————3. Sacramento: 84,556————-3. Sacramento: 93,476
4. Portland: 36,278—————–4. Austin: 46,575———————-4. Austin: 71,539
5. Austin: 35,239——————–5. Portland: 43,185——————-5. St. Paul: 61,082
6. St. Paul: 35,184——————6. St. Paul: 41,989——————-6. Charlotte: 55,142
7. Columbus: 27,125—————7. Las Vegas: 37,406—————7. Columbus: 53,027
8. Las Vegas: 25,077————–8. Charlotte: 37,181—————–8. Portland: 52,219
9. Charlotte: 23,356—————-9. Columbus: 35,468—————-9. Las Vegas: 44,735
10. Virginia Beach: 22,501——10. San Antonio: 29,200———–10. San Antonio: 38,119
11. San Antonio: 20,492———11. Virginia Beach: 27,303—–11. Virginia Beach: 29,735
12. Minneapolis: 20,189———12. Milwaukee: 22,670————–12. Minneapolis: 26,833
13. Milwaukee: 19,596———–13. Minneapolis: 21,426————13. Indianapolis: 26,548
14. Nashville: 16,943————-14. Wichita: 19,420——————14. Milwaukee: 25,624
15. Wichita: 15,417—————15. Indianapolis: 17,137————15. Madison: 24,455
16. Madison: 12,708————–16. Nashville: 17,045—————16. Nashville: 24,034
17. Indianapolis: 12,312———17. Madison: 16,671—————-17. Wichita: 19,548
18. Providence: 10,751———-18. Pittsburgh: 12,036————–18. Pittsburgh: 19,357
19. Pittsburgh: 10,727————19. Providence: 11,497————19. Omaha: 17,412
20. Kansas City: 10,674———20. Lincoln: 10,452——————20. Des Moines: 17,143
21. Detroit: 9,577——————21. Kansas City: 10,263———–21. Kansas City: 15,213
22. Des Moines: 8,796———–22. Des Moines: 8,867————-22. Fort Wayne: 14,039
23. Lincoln: 7,513—————–23. St. Louis: 8,717—————–23. Lincoln: 13,992
24. St. Louis: 7,046—————24. Omaha: 8,397——————-24. Orlando: 11,852
25. Omaha: 6,971—————–25. Orlando: 7,870——————25. Detroit: 11,790
26. Cincinnati: 6,874————-26. Fort Wayne: 6,945————–26. St. Louis: 10,404
27. Cleveland: 6,289————27. Detroit: 6,549———————27. Providence: 9,361
28. Orlando: 5,528—————28. Cincinnati: 5,938—————-28. Cleveland: 9,217
29. Fort Wayne: 4,241———-29. Cleveland: 5,392—————-29. Akron: 8,007
30. Toledo: 4,150—————-30. Akron: 4,567———————30. Cincinnati: 7,906
31. Akron: 3,497—————–31. Grand Rapids: 3,695———–31. Grand Rapids: 7,056
32. Grand Rapids: 2,847——32. Toledo: 3,125——————–32. Toledo: 3,679
33. Dayton: 1,827—————33. Dayton: 1,231——————–33. Dayton: 848

Columbus maintained its rank since 2005.

Rank by City of Total Hispanic Population by Year

2005——————————————–2010————————————2017

1. Chicago: 778,234—————1. San Antonio: 853,654———-1. San Antonio: 969,065
2. San Antonio: 735,458———–2. Chicago: 763,968—————2. Chicago: 787,978
3. San Jose: 279,420————–3. San Jose: 318,389————–3. San Jose: 332,603
4. Austin: 223,361——————4. Austin: 288,130——————4. Austin: 324,973
5. Las Vegas: 153,813————5. Las Vegas: 181,923————-5. Las Vegas: 219,220
6. Sacramento: 111,559———6. Sacramento: 124,461———–6. Sacramento: 141,752
7. Milwaukee: 80,945————-7. Milwaukee: 104,619————-7. Milwaukee: 133,812
8. Providence: 60,008————-8. Charlotte: 96,246—————-8. Charlotte: 122,904
9. Charlotte: 58,466—————9. Indianapolis: 78,467————-9. Indianapolis: 93,042
10. Wichita: 49,928—————10. Providence: 76,645————10. Orlando: 86,305
11. Indianapolis: 47,764———11. Nashville: 61,212—————11. Providence: 77,893
12. Detroit: 46,993—————-12. Wichita: 59,823——————12. Nashville: 69,574
13. Orlando: 43,978————–13. Portland: 58,986—————–13. Wichita: 68,389
14. Portland: 43,324————–14. Orlando: 56,061—————–14. Portland: 67,551
15. Omaha: 39,674—————15. Omaha: 53,661——————15. Omaha: 66,056
16. Nashville: 37,463————-16. Kansas City: 49,800————16. Columbus: 55,782
17. Minneapolis: 37,017———17. Detroit: 45,580——————-17. Detroit: 48,328
18. Kansas City: 35,995———18. Columbus: 43,276————–18. Cleveland: 47,962
19. Grand Rapids: 32,368——19. Cleveland: 36,067————–19. Minneapolis: 46,375
20. Cleveland: 32,085———–20. Minneapolis: 34,504———–20. Kansas City: 45,975
21. Columbus: 24,607———–21. Grand Rapids: 30,659——21. Virginia Beach: 36,723
22. St. Paul: 22,402————–22. Virginia Beach: 29,206—–22. Grand Rapids: 32,016
23. Virginia Beach: 20,803—–23. St. Paul: 28,725————–23. Des Moines: 31,333
24. Des Moines: 18,952——–24. Des Moines: 23,832———-24. St. Paul: 30,007
25. Toledo: 18,404————–25. Toledo: 21,346——————25. Fort Wayne: 24,724
26. Fort Wayne: 16,438——-26. Fort Wayne: 19,576————26. Toledo: 22,796
27. Madison: 11,997———–27. Lincoln: 16,007——————27. Lincoln: 21,921
28. Lincoln: 9,672—————28. Madison: 14,062—————28. Madison: 20,741
29. St. Louis: 8,268————-29. St. Louis: 11,207————–29. St. Louis: 12,447
30. Pittsburgh: 5,018———-30. Cincinnati: 8,710—————30. Cincinnati: 11,787
31. Cincinnati: 3,855———–31. Pittsburgh: 7,282————–31. Pittsburgh: 9,212
32. Akron: 3,485—————-32. Akron: 3,990——————–32. Dayton: 5,765
33. Dayton: 1,693————–33. Dayton: 3,180——————-33. Akron: 5,536

Columbus moved up from 21st to 16th in the total Hispanic population.

Rank by City of Total Other, non-Hispanic Population by Year

2005——————————————-2010—————————————–2017

1. Chicago: 38,694—————1. Chicago: 37,379——————–1. Chicago: 58,721
2. San Jose: 29,456————2. San Jose: 32,439——————–2. Portland: 41,595
3. Sacramento: 21,370———-3. Sacramento: 30,900—————3. San Jose: 41,175
4. Portland: 21,164————–4. Portland: 28,027———————4. Sacramento: 40,066
5. Indianapolis: 20,242———-5. Las Vegas: 24,521—————–5. Columbus: 34,467
6. Columbus: 20,096————-6. Columbus: 23,738—————–6. Indianapolis: 32,525
7. San Antonio: 19,130———-7. San Antonio: 20,778————–7. Las Vegas: 31,889
8. Minneapolis: 18,580———-8. Minneapolis: 20,753————–8. San Antonio: 31,341
9. Detroit: 18,324—————–9. Virginia Beach: 20,268———-9. Austin: 30,541
10. Las Vegas: 18,304———-10. Indianapolis: 20,086———-10. Charlotte: 28,632
11. Virginia Beach: 16,685—-11. Charlotte: 18,360————–11. Virginia Beach: 24,458
12. Milwaukee: 14,476———-12. Detroit: 16,776—————–12. Nashville: 23,334
13. Kansas City: 13,399——–13. Milwaukee: 16,311———–13. Minneapolis: 21,808
14. Austin: 13,261—————-14. Wichita: 16,091—————14. Milwaukee: 20,166
15. Charlotte: 11,771————-15. Omaha: 15,519————–15. Wichita: 18,763
16. Wichita: 11,545—————16. Austin: 14,915—————-16. Kansas City: 16,743
17. Omaha: 8,552—————–17. Kansas City: 14,668——–17. Omaha: 15,988
18. St. Paul: 7,741—————-18. Nashville: 14,227————18. Cleveland: 15,586
19. Toledo: 7,447—————–19. St. Paul: 13,098————–19. Orlando: 13,429
20. Cincinnati: 7,315————-20. Pittsburgh: 11,280———–20. Detroit: 12,461
21. Cleveland: 7,004————-21. Toledo: 10,134—————21. Pittsburgh: 11,890
22. Providence: 6,488———–22. Akron: 9,020——————22. St. Paul: 11,220
23. Pittsburgh: 6,138————23. Fort Wayne: 8,513———–23. Fort Wayne: 11,180
24. St. Louis: 6,058————–24. Cleveland: 8,276————-24. Lincoln: 11,037
25. Fort Wayne: 5,774———-25. St. Louis: 7,704————–25. Toledo: 11,009
26. Orlando: 5,731—————26. Lincoln: 7,483—————-26. Cincinnati: 10,995
27. Nashville: 5,687————-27. Grand Rapids: 7,376——–27. Des Moines: 9,627
28. Madison: 4,708————–28. Orlando: 7,251—————28. Akron: 8,894
29. Lincoln: 4,508—————-29. Cincinnati: 7,230————29. Madison: 8,292
30. Akron: 4,431—————–30. Madison: 7,177————–30. St. Louis: 7,543
31. Grand Rapids: 4,154——31. Providence: 6,471———–31. Grand Rapids: 7,260
32. Des Moines: 2,674———32. Des Moines: 5,598———-32. Providence: 6,539
33. Dayton: 1,382—————33. Dayton: 3,025—————-33. Dayton: 5,629

Finally, Columbus moved up from 6th to 5th in the total of Other, non-Hispanic population. Overall, Columbus ranks fairly well in totals vs. its peers, as one might expect given that it is one of the largest cities in the grouping. However, to truly find out how it compares with these other cities, you have to look at percentages, which tells how much of the city’s population is made up of each group.


Columbus ranks in the middle of the pack for its % of Non-Hispanic White population. Like in most cities, even while this demographic is growing in total numbers in Columbus, the % of total population continues to fall.


Columbus ranked in the top 3rd of peer cities for its % of Non-Hispanic Black population.


Columbus also ranked in the top 3rd for its Non-Hispanic Asian population.


Columbus ranks poorly with Hispanics in the group, ranking near the bottom.


Finally, Columbus ranks in the middle for its Non-Hispanic Other population.

So what’s the final ranking for where Columbus is with diversity compared to its peers in 2017? To find out, I assigned points based on ranked position in each 5 racial categories and took the average of the positions in each 5. The result is that the higher the average number, the lower the overall diversity.

So based on this, Columbus ranks in the top half of national and Midwest peers for diversity.

*Note: Normally, Youngstown would be included, but the data was not available.




The Recovery of Downtown vs Cleveland and Cincinnati Part #1- Update




**Updated with 2016 data, originally posted 2013.

Columbus’ downtown has seen many many changes, especially over the last decade. Developments like the Arena District, Columbus Commons, the Scioto Mile and more have brought new life to the area. Dozens of new restaurants have opened the past year or two alone, and a new grocery store will be opening for area residents in February. More developments coming up include the Scioto River restoration project that will create acres of new Downtown park space and pathways, and the redevelopment of the Scioto Peninsula behind COSI should connect the two sides of the river. All of this had led to rising population, now approaching 8,500. Nearly 3,000 residential units are currently under construction or planned. So the question I was wondering is how has population been changing not only in Columbus’ downtown, but in comparison to Cleveland and Cincinnati. Both of those cities have also seen major projects in their downtown cores and are seeing an uptick in their downtown populations.

First, I examined the 1950 city limits for all three cities. This was the last census year before sprawl really took hold and changed the city dynamics and growth patterns. 1950 is also when most cities in Ohio reached their peak urban population, so I thought it would be interesting to see how those old boundaries had changed over the years. I went to the US census website and began to look up all the census tracts that existed in each city in 1950. Those would represent my base area that I would use to see the changes in the city core. All of the 3-Cs have grown beyond those 1950 boundaries, especially Columbus, but these areas were the hardest hit when the urban decline came the last 50-60 years while the suburbs grew. The results are both sobering and hopeful.

1950 Boundary Population Change 1950-2016
Cincinnati: -224,119
Cleveland: -540,935
Columbus: -138,491

1950 Boundary Population Change 2010-2016
Cincinnati: +1,370
Cleveland: -7,028
Columbus: +2,637

1950 Boundary Population % Change 1950-2016
Cincinnati: -44.5%
Cleveland: -59.1.%
Columbus: -36.9%

1950 Boundary Population % Change 2010-2016
Cincinnati: +0.5%
Cleveland: -1.9%
Columbus: +1.1%

So what do these numbers show? Well, it’s clear that all 3 cities had urban core population declines the past 65+ years just like just about every other city in the nation did. This was mostly a result of the suburban movement.
In Cleveland, the rate of loss had gradually been slowing down since the 1970s, but suddenly skyrocketed again in the 2000s. I’m not sure what exactly caused this. The double recessions made it more difficult for people to move, so if anything, the losses should’ve not accelerated. Cleveland lost over 90,000 people in its urban core from 2000-2010, the highest lost by % and total of any Ohio city.
In Cincinnati, population loss had peaked in the 1970s and the rate of loss fell substantially the following decade. However, the past 2 decades have actually seen a gradual acceleration of losses. The 2000-2010 period saw the second biggest total loss for the urban core, but there has been a significant turnaround (if estimates are correct) and the city is seeing growth now.
For Columbus, it’s been the opposite picture. Like the other 2-Cs, losses peaked in the 1970s. Since then, the urban core losses have been in gradual decline. The 2000-2010 period had the smallest rate and total loss of any decade the past 65+ years, and since 2010, there has been net growth.

So interesting results, but these numbers don’t show any trends of what’s going on inside the 1950 boundaries, especially not the relatively small part that would be the downtowns. So let’s break the numbers down to the tract level.

# of Tracts in 1950*
Cincinnat: 107
Cleveland: 201
Columbus: 48

*The number of tracts changed from 1950 on as some were split or consolidated. This made it more complicated, but luckily the Census gives lists on how tracts changed over time, so one can figure out what tract became what and reasonably keep up with the same boundaries that existed in 1950.

So with this breakdown, we can see more of the trends within the 1950 boundaries. In Cincinnati, a long decline was followed by a recovery in 1990, only to have the next 20 years show an increasing decline. The 2010 census showed the fewest number of tracts growing on record. This is the worst performance of the 3-Cs. Cleveland also had a steep decline followed by a recovery, but it too declined more at the last census, but not nearly to the low point it reached in the 1970s and 1980s.

Meanwhile, Columbus also faced an initial steep decline and barely had any tracts growing during the 1970s. Since then, the trend has been up. The 16 growing tracts in 2010 were the highest since the 1940s. This is the best performance of the 3-Cs, and Columbus had the highest % of growing tracts in its core. Still, those 16 represent less than 1/3rd of the total tracts within the 1950 boundaries. However, in the case of all 3 cities, the 2010-2016 has greatly increased the number of growing tracts, again if we are to believe the Census estimates.




Young Professionals: A Comparison

**Updated 11/22/2017.

Millennials and Young Professionals are big news these days. Millennials are the largest generation ever in terms of total numbers (exceeding 76 million), and their choices are already having big impacts on everything from housing to the economy, and Young Professionals have long been an important urban demographic. I wanted to look at Columbus and its peers to see where it ranks in terms of attracting the 25-34 age group that include these demographics.

For the comparison, I looked at metro areas of 1.5-2.5 million as well as major Midwest metros and then used their core cities to get the numbers.

Rank of Total Population Aged 25-34

2005_______________________2010___________________2016

1. Chicago: 463,236_______1. Chicago: 510,042________1. Chicago: 532,349
2. San Antonio: 180,981_____2. San Antonio: 200,645____2. San Antonio: 241,783
3. Austin: 137,523_________3. Austin: 162,247_________3. Austin: 214,687
4. San Jose, CA: 133,144___4. Columbus: 147,584______4. Columbus: 180,685
5. Columbus: 131,641______5. San Jose, CA: 142,551___5. San Jose, CA: 165,408
6. Indianapolis: 114,532_____6. Indianapolis: 133,088____6. Charlotte, NC: 149,024
7. Detroit: 110,759_________7. Charlotte, NC: 127,539___7. Indianapolis: 143,328
8. Charlotte, NC: 100,025____8. Portland, OR: 113,210___8. Nashville: 130,593
9. Portland, OR: 90,023_____9. Nashville: 110,882______9. Portland: 127,557
10. Las Vegas: 84,418______10. Milwaukee: 97,359____10. Milwaukee: 101,449
11. Milwaukee: 82,060______11. Detroit: 85,023_______11. Detroit: 101,246
12. Sacramento, CA: 75,497___12. Minneapolis: 81,532__12. Sacramento: 92,883
13. Minneapolis: 74,208___13. Las Vegas: 81,212______13. Minneapolis: 90,022
14. Kansas City, MO: 68,060__14. Sacramento: 78,527__14. Las Vegas: 84,756
15. Virginia Beach: 60,749__15. Kansas City: 73,872____15. Kansas City: 81,532
16. Omaha, NE: 56,248____16. Virginia Beach: 67,614__16. Virginia Beach: 75,365
17. Wichita, KS: 52,426____17. Omaha: 62,396________17. Omaha: 72,055
18. Cleveland: 50,558_____18. St. Louis: 57,627_______18. Orlando: 63,947
19. St. Louis: 48,137______19. Wichita: 56,737________19. Pittsburgh: 62,515
20. Cincinnati: 44,945_____20. Cleveland: 54,428______20. St. Louis: 61,777
21. Toledo: 43,134_______21. Pittsburgh: 51,109______21. Cleveland: 58,773
22. Orlando: 40,846______22. St. Paul: 50,107________22. Wichita: 57,869
23. St. Paul, MN: 39,676__23. Cincinnati: 49,067_______23. St. Paul: 55,306
24. Lincoln, NE: 38,893___24. Orlando: 48,102________24. Cincinnati: 54,754
25. Madison, WI: 38,826___25. Madison: 44,662_______25. Madison: 48,759
26. Pittsburgh: 38,744____26. Lincoln: 42,034_________26. Lincoln: 43,882
27. Grand Rapids: 35,287__27. Toledo: 41,580________27: Toledo: 42,888
28. Des Moines: 32,640__28. Fort Wayne: 35,193______28. Grand Rapids: 39,829
29. Fort Wayne, IN: 31,738__29. Providence: 31,044____29. Fort Wayne: 37,372
30. Akron: 30,436_______30. Grand Rapids: 30,963____30. Des Moines: 34,961
31. Providence, RI: 29,307__31. Des Moines: 30,376____31. Providence: 30,630
32. Dayton: 18,591_______32. Akron: 27,446_________32. Akron: 29,786
33. Youngstown: 8,505____33. Dayton: 20,278________33. Dayton: 22,930
34. Nashville, TN: N/A___34. Youngtown: 8,484_______34. Youngstown: 7,621

So Columbus ranks highly among total population in the 25-34 age group. But what about growth?

Total Growth Rank in 25-34 Population 2005-2016

1. Austin, TX: 77,164
2. Chicago: 69,113
3. San Antonio, TX: 60,802
4. Columbus: 49,044
5. Charlotte, NC: 48,999
6. Portland, OR: 37,534
7. San Jose, CA: 32,264
8. Indianapolis, IN: 28,796
9. Pittsburgh, PA: 23,771
10. Orlando, FL: 23,101
11. Milwaukee, WI: 19,389
12. Sacramento, CA: 17,386
13. Minneapolis, MN: 15,814
14. Omaha, NE: 15,807
15. St. Paul, MN: 15,630
16. Virginia Beach, VA: 14,616
17. St. Louis, MO: 13,642
18. Kansas City, MO: 13,472
19. Madison, WI: 9,933
20. Cincinnati: 9,809
21. Cleveland: 8,215
22. Fort Wayne, IN: 5,634
23. Wichita, KS: 5,443
24. Lincoln, NE: 4,989
25. Grand Rapids, MI: 4,542
26. Dayton: 4,339
27. Des Moines, IA: 2,321
28. Providence, RI: 1,323
29. Las Vegas, NV: 338
30. Toledo: -246
31. Akron: -650
32. Youngstown: -884
33. Detroit, MI: -9,513
34. Nashville: N/A

Again, Columbus ranks near the top during this period. What about more recently, since 2010?

Total Growth Rank of 25-34 Population 2010-2016

1. Austin: 52,440
2. San Antonio: 41,138
3. Columbus: 33,101
4. San Jose: 22,857
5. Chicago: 22,307
6. Charlotte: 21,485
7. Nashville: 19,711
8. Detroit: 16,223
9. Orlando: 15,845
10. Sacramento: 14,356
11. Portland: 14,347
12. Pittsburgh: 11,406
13. Indianapolis: 10,240
14. Omaha: 9,659
15. Grand Rapids: 8,866
16. Minneapolis: 8,490
17. Virginia Beach: 7,751
18. Kansas City: 7,660
19. Cincinnati: 5,687
20. St. Paul: 5,199
21. Des Moines: 4,585
22. Cleveland: 4,345
23. St. Louis: 4,152
24. Madison: 4,097
25. Milwaukee: 4,090
26. Las Vegas: 3,544
27. Dayton: 2,652
28. Akron: 2,340
29. Fort Wayne: 2,179
30. Lincoln: 1,848
31. Toledo: 1,308
32. Wichita: 1,132
33. Providence: -414
34. Youngstown: -863

So Columbus is also doing well since 2010 and attracts significantly more people in the 25-34 age group than cities often cited for this very metric.

Finally, now that we know the totals and the growth, what is the % of total city population that the 25-34 age group makes up?

25-34 % of Total City Population 2016

1. Orlando: 23.1%
2. Austin: 22.6%
3. Minneapolis: 21.8%
4. Columbus: 20.9%
5. Pittsburgh: 20.6%
6. Grand Rapids: 20.3%
7. Portland: 19.9%
8. Nashville: 19.8%
9. St. Louis: 19.8%
10. Chicago: 19.7%
11. Madison: 19.3%
12. Sacramento: 18.8%
13. Cincinnati: 18.3%
14. St. Paul: 18.3%
15. Charlotte: 17.7%
16. Providence: 17.1%
17. Milwaukee: 17.0%
18. Kansas City: 16.9%
19. Indianapolis: 16.8%
20. Virginia Beach: 16.7%
21. Des Moines: 16.2%
22. San Antonio: 16.2%
23. Omaha: 16.1%
24. San Jose: 16.1%
25. Lincoln: 15.7%
26. Toledo: 15.4%
27. Cleveland: 15.2%
28. Akron: 15.1%
29. Detroit: 15.0%
30. Wichita: 14.8%
31. Fort Wayne: 14.3%
32. Las Vegas: 13.4%
33. Youngstown: 11.9%
34. Dayton: 8.2%

Columbus has an existing large population of the 25-34 age demographic, and looks to be one of the strongest performers into the near future.
Some would ask why that would be considering that Columbus transit is woefully lacking and has a reputation (very undeservedly, in my opinion) of being suburban- characteristics that Millennials/YPers supposedly almost universally reject. Perhaps the bottom line is that economics trump all other desires. Cost of living and employment tend to be higher up the list than rail lines, and Columbus has both a strong economy and relatively low COL. Whatever the case may be, Columbus seems to be doing something right.

For more information on demographics, go to: Columbus Demographics
And for Franklin County racial and economic maps, go to: Census Tract and Zip Code Maps

Columbus Slowly Becoming Ohio’s Largest Job Market- In One Graph

The Columbus metro has long been Ohio’s 3rd largest labor market, but that seems to be changing over time.

The January 2015 labor force jumped to a record high, and if trends hold, may pass the other 2 Cs by the end of the year.

Columbus Metro Density vs. Peer and Midwest Metros

No, this is not a repost. Awhile back, I did a post on population by mile marker from “City Hall”. You can find that post here: http://allcolumbusdata.com/?p=1079
In the post, I compared Columbus with the 14 other largest Midwest metros.

Over the years, I’ve learned that Columbus has a very suburban reputation, meaning that it is perceived to have very low density throughout, especially because it aggressively annexed suburban areas into the city limits decades ago. With those claims, I wondered what the density would be if Columbus’ area size was scaled down to others to find out if it really deserves the suburban reputation. Bare with me, because there is a lot to look at.

First, I used Columbus’ 18 peer metros (population 1.5-2.5 million) as well as the 14 large Midwest metros. Since there was some overlap in the 2 groups, it made for a total group comparison of 27. So a fairly sizeable group. Next, I used the mile marker population, which in the City Hall census analysis is made up of circles going out from the center. So it’s just a matter of finding the area of each circle and dividing the population into that. What’s left is the density by area.

Density at Mile Marker 1, with an Area of 3.14 Square Miles.

2000———————————-2010
1. Chicago: 42,492.4______________________ 1. Chicago:57,870.7
2. Minneapolis: 36,801.6__________________ 2. Minneapolis: 39,339.5
3. Providence, RI: 36,476.1_______________ 3. Providence, RI: 36,693.0
4. San Jose, CA: 31,854.8_________________ 4. San Jose, CA: 33,438.9
5. Las Vegas: 27,618.8____________________ 5. Milwaukee: 27,471.7
6. Milwaukee: 26,755.1____________________ 6. Portland, OR: 25,987.6
7. Grand Rapids, MI: 25,748.1_____________ 7. Las Vegas: 25,069.1
8. Pittsburgh: 25,570.7___________________ 8. Grand Rapids, MI: 24,080.6
9. Cincinnati: 22,728.0___________________ 9. Pittsburgh: 23,464.3
10. Portland, OR: 21,256.1________________ 10. Austin, TX: 23,149.4
11. Toledo: 20,973.6______________________ 11. Cincinnati: 20,781.5
12. Austin, TX: 20,301.9__________________ 12. San Antonio, TX: 18,596.8
13. San Antonio, TX: 20,156.7_____________ 13. Omaha: 17,905.7
14. Akron: 19,946.2_______________________ 14. Toledo: 17,751.3
15. Omaha: 17,922.6_______________________ 15. Akron: 17,106.7
16. Dayton: 16,311.5______________________ 16. Columbus: 15,817.5
17. Columbus: 16,151.6____________________ 17. Nashville: 15,529.3
18. Indianapolis: 15,865.6________________ 18. Sacramento, CA: 15,512.7
19. Nashville: 15,554.4___________________ 19. Charlotte, NC: 14,873.9
20. Sacramento, CA: 15,385.7______________ 20. Indianapolis: 14,356.4

Density at Mile Marker 2, with an Area of 12.57 Square Miles.
2000————————————–2010
1. Chicago: 22,808.1______________________ 1. Chicago: 25,339.9
2. San Jose, CA: 18,854.7_________________ 2. San Jose, CA: 19,696.3
3. Minneapolis: 17,936.8__________________ 3. Minneapolis: 18,212.2
4. Milwaukee: 16,799.9____________________ 4. Milwaukee: 16,609.1
5. Providence, RI: 16,134.9_______________ 5. Providence, RI: 16,457.6
6. Las Vegas: 16,016.4____________________ 6. Las Vegas: 15,331.4
7. Pittsburgh: 13,232.7___________________ 7. Austin, TX: 12,524.4
8. San Antonio, TX: 12,427.0______________ 8. Pittsburgh: 12,123.2
9. Cincinnati: 12,250.1___________________ 9. Portland, OR: 11,881.0
10. Austin, TX: 12,152.8__________________ 10. San Antonio, TX: 11,690.5
11. Columbus: 11,203.7____________________ 11. Sacramento, CA: 11,324.8
12. Akron: 10,999.9_______________________ 12. Cincinnati: 10,997.2
13. Grand Rapids, MI: 10,884.2____________ 13. Columbus: 10,726.0
14. Sacramento, CA: 10,606.1______________ 14. Grand Rapids, MI: 10,146.0
15. Dayton: 9,756.8_______________________ 15. Akron: 9,737.1
16. Indianapolis: 9,383.0_________________ 16. Omaha: 8,993.2
17. Omaha: 8,960.7________________________ 17. Indianapolis: 8,147.3
18. Toledo: 8,816.9_______________________ 18. Dayton: 8,100.0
19. Orlando: 8,212.5______________________ 19. Charlotte: 8,086.8
20. Charlotte: 8,095.5____________________ 20. Nashville: 7,777.6

Density at Mile Marker 3, with an Area of 28.27 Square Miles
2000————————————2010
1. Chicago: 17,528.7_____________________ 1. Chicago: 18,003.2
2. San Jose, CA: 13,883.0________________ 2. San Jose, CA: 14,549.2
3. Las Vegas: 11,646.0___________________ 3. Las Vegas: 11,576.2
4. Minneapolis: 11,494.2_________________ 4. Minneapolis: 11,503.3
5. Milwaukee: 11,448.9___________________ 5. Milwaukee: 11,288.0
6. Providence: 11,173.7__________________ 6. Providence, RI: 11,240.2
7. Pittsburgh: 10,594.4__________________ 7. Pittsburgh: 9,738.7
8. San Antonio. TX: 9,234.3______________ 8. Portland, OR: 8,973.6
9. Portland, OR: 8,257.0_________________ 9. San Antonio, TX: 8,846.8
10. Cincinnati: 8,141.9__________________ 10. Columbus: 7,834.0
11. Columbus: 8,134.9____________________ 11. Sacramento, CA: 7,668.7
12. Sacramento, CA: 7,261.5______________ 12. Austin, TX: 7,534.0
13. Austin, TX: 7,232.3__________________ 13. Cincinnati: 7,273.6
14. Akron: 6,925.4_______________________ 14. Grand Rapids, MI: 6,540.0
15. Grand Rapids, MI: 6,852.0____________ 15. Akron: 6,284.9
16. Indianapolis: 6,727.9________________ 16. Orlando: 6,055.1
17. Toledo: 6,651.5______________________ 17. Omaha: 5,968.3
18. Dayton: 6,382.8______________________ 18. Toledo: 5,982.1
19. St. Louis: 6,093.7___________________ 19. Indianapolis: 5,879.9
20. Kansas City: 6,025.1_________________ 20. St. Louis: 5,663.8

Density at Mile Marker 4, with an Area of 50.27 Square Miles
2000———————————2010
1. Chicago: 15,447.2____________________ 1. Chicago: 15,205.9
2. San Jose, CA: 12,209.3_______________ 2. San Jose, CA: 12,629.6
3. Las Vegas: 9,788.0___________________ 3. Las Vegas: 10,022.2
4. Minneapolis: 8,874.4_________________ 4. Minneapolis: 8,921.8
5. Milwaukee: 8,823.8___________________ 5. Milwaukee: 8,725.5
6. Providence, RI: 8,454.3______________ 6. Providence, RI: 8,483.8
7. Pittsburgh: 8,216.0__________________ 7. Portland, OR: 7,785.5
8. Portland, OR: 7,282.9________________ 8. Pittsburgh: 7,602.6
9. San Antonio, TX: 7,208.6_____________ 9. San Antonio, TX: 6,995.5
10. Cincinnati: 6,922.8_________________ 10. Cincinnati: 6,279.4
11. Columbus: 6,449.3___________________ 11. Columbus: 6,257.4
12. Sacramento, CA: 5,744.7_____________ 12. Sacramento, CA: 6,138.5
13. Austin, TX: 5,541.5_________________ 13. Austin, TX: 5,847.2
14. St. Louis: 5,447.5__________________ 14. Omaha: 5,047.2
15. Cleveland: 5,356.2__________________ 15. St. Louis: 5,001.6
16. Indianapolis: 5,348.8_______________ 16. Grand Rapids, MI: 4,922.9
17. Detroit: 5,163.1____________________ 17. Orlando: 4,911.7
18. Omaha: 5,019.8______________________ 18. Indianapolis: 4,793.5
19. Akron: 4,900.7______________________ 19. Akron: 4,532.0
20. Dayton: 4,889.3_____________________ 20. Cleveland: 4,521.8

Density at Mile Marker 5, with an Area of 78.54 Square Miles

Note that this area size is about the current city size of Cincinnati and Cleveland.
2000————————————2010
1. Chicago: 14,213.6___________________ 1. Chicago: 13,591.0
2. San Jose, CA: 10,464.0______________ 2. San Jose, CA: 11,037.1
3. Las Vegas: 8,521.9__________________ 3. Las Vegas: 9,062.8
4. Minneapolis: 7,443.0________________ 4. Minneapolis: 7,455.9
5. Milwaukee: 7,081.2__________________ 5. Milwaukee: 7,029.1
6. Pittsburgh: 7,009.9_________________ 6. Pittsburgh: 6,492.7
7. San Antonio, TX: 6,326.6____________ 7. Portland, OR: 6,442.3
8. Providence, RI: 6,048.3_____________ 8. San Antonio, TX: 6,223.4
9. Portland, OR: 5,950.1_______________ 9. Providence, RI: 6,055.8
10. Cincinnati: 5,588.9________________ 10. Sacramento, CA: 5,664.2
11. Cleveland: 5,494.6_________________ 11. Orlando: 5,274.1
12. Columbus: 5,252.9__________________ 12. Columbus: 5,152.1
13. Sacramento, CA: 5,104.0____________ 13. Cincinnati: 5,096.2
14. Orlando: 4,993.7___________________ 14. Austin, TX: 4,993.7
15. Austin, TX: 4,786.5________________ 15. Cleveland: 4,602.4
16. Detroit: 4,748.7___________________ 16. St. Louis: 4,285.4
17. St. Louis: 4,731.5_________________ 17. Indianapolis: 4,086.1
18. Indianapolis: 4,447.7______________ 18. Omaha: 3,962.2
19. Akron: 4,025.9_____________________ 19. Grand Rapids, MI: 3,887.3
20. Grand Rapids, MI: 3,990.6__________ 20. Akron: 3,778.8

So if Columbus was the same size as Cincinnati and Cleveland, it would be the most dense city of the 3. And it’s generally in the top half of the grouping in its most urban areas.

But what about further out, past the urban core?

Density at Mile Marker 10, with an Area of 314.16 Square Miles.

This area size is much larger than the city limits of Columbus, but it gives an idea of the larger area’s density and not just within the city limits.
2000———————————–2010
1. Chicago: 9,344.3______________________ 1. Chicago: 8,795.0
2. San Jose, CA: 4,563.2_________________ 2. San Jose, CA: 4,809.8
3. Minneapolis: 4,183.2__________________ 3. Las Vegas: 4,794.2
4. Detroit: 4,117.4______________________ 4. Portland, OR: 4,230.3
5. Las Vegas: 3,877.3____________________ 5. Minneapolis: 4,178.3
6. Portland: 3,780.8_____________________ 6. San Antonio, TX: 3,454.9
7. Cleveland: 3,308.4____________________ 7. Detroit: 3,354.7
8. Pittsburgh: 3,279.8___________________ 8. Columbus: 3,163.9
9. San Antonio, TX: 3,217.8______________ 9. Pittsburgh: 3,080.4
10. Milwaukee: 3,013.7___________________ 10. Orlando: 3,055.0
11. Columbus: 2,973.3____________________ 11. Sacramento, CA: 3,016.4
12. St. Louis: 2,937.6___________________ 12. Milwaukee: 3,006.2
13. Cincinnati: 2,873.4__________________ 13. Cleveland: 2,923.7
14. Orlando: 2,783.9_____________________ 14. Indianapolis: 2,772.6
15. Sacramento, CA: 2,736.7______________ 15. St. Louis: 2,751.3
16. Indianapolis: 2,652.6________________ 16. Cincinnati: 2,746.8
17. Kansas City: 2,599.0_________________ 17. Kansas City: 2,538.3
18. Providence, RI: 2,360.0______________ 18. Austin, TX: 2,439.6
19. Austin, TX: 2,111.3__________________ 19. Providence, RI: 2,375.1
20. Dayton: 1,920.7______________________ 20. Charlotte, NC: 2,332.7

So what does all this tell us? That while Columbus is not the most dense city of its peer group, or within the Midwest group, it probably does not wholly deserve its low-density, suburban reputation. Most of the measurements are in the top half of the grouping for density, yes, but it is clearly the most weak in the urban core closest to Downtown, as that ranking is the lowest for it. The Mile 0 population, for example, is down near the very bottom, and that is a good reason why densities are not as high as they should/could be. Currently, Downtown and surrounding neighborhoods are seeing a residential development boom, so that will help, but the city needs to think a lot bigger if it wants that stereotype to truly go away. The recent abandonment of the Convention Center mixed-use project is not a good way to go about that goal… and it should be a goal.