2017 County/Metro Population Estimates Part 2




In part 2, I am going to examine metro areas, not only in Ohio, but also Columbus’ peer group that includes Midwest and national metro areas. Midwest peers (outside Ohio) used would be any metro with a population greater than 500,000. National peers would be metros that either started or ended the period 2010-2017 with a population between 1.5-2.5 Million.

As with counties, I am going to start this look with a comparison of overall population.

Total Metro Area Population Census 2010, July 1, 2016 and July 1, 2017

Census 2010——————————-July 1, 2016————————July 1, 2017
1. Chicago, IL: 9,461,104————-1. Chicago: 9,546,326———–1. Chicago: 9,533,040
2. Detroit, MI: 4,296,250—————2. Detroit: 4,305,869————-2. Detroit: 9,313,002
3. Minneapolis, MN: 3,348,8459—3. Minneapolis: 3,557,276–3. Minneapolis: 3,600,618
4. St. Louis, MO: 2,787,701———4. St. Louis: 2,806,782———4. St. Louis: 2,807,338
5. Pittsburgh, PA: 2,356,285——–5. Charlotte: 2,475,519———5. Charlotte: 2,525,305
6. Portland, OR: 2,226,009———-6. Orlando: 2,453,333———-6. Orlando: 2,509,831
7. Charlotte: 2,217,012———–7. San Antonio: 2,426,211—–7. San Antonio: 2,473,974
8. Sacramento, CA: 2,149,127—–8. Portland: 2,423,102——–8. Portland: 2,453,168
9. San Antonio, TX: 2,142,516—–9. Pittsburgh: 2,341,536——9. Pittsburgh: 2,333,367
10. Orlando, FL: 2,134,411—–10. Sacramento: 2,295,233—10. Sacramento: 2,324,884
11. Cincinnati: 2,114,580———-11. Cincinnati: 2,166,029—–11. Las Vegas: 2,204,079
12. Cleveland: 2,077,240————12. Las Vegas: 2,156,724—-12. Cincinnati: 2,179,082
13. Kansas City, MO: 2,009,342-13. Kansas City: 2,106,382-13. Kansas City: 2,128,912
14. Las Vegas, NV: 1,951,269——–14. Austin: 2,060,558——–14. Austin: 2,115,827
15. Columbus: 1,901,974———-15. Cleveland: 2,060,065——15. Columbus: 2,078,725
16. Indianapolis, IN: 1,887,877——16. Columbus: 2,046,977—16. Cleveland: 2,058,844
17. San Jose, CA: 1,836,911—17. Indianapolis: 2,005,612—17. Indianapolis: 2,028,614
18. Austin, TX: 1,716,289————18. San Jose: 1,990,910—-18. San Jose: 1,998,463
19. Virginia Beach, VA: 1,676,822—19. Nashville: 1,868,855—-19. Nashville: 1,903,045
20. Nashville: 1,670,890—20. Virginia Beach: 1,722,766–20. Virginia Beach: 1,725,246
21. Providence, RI: 1,600,852—-21. Providence: 1,615,878—21. Providence: 1,621,122
22. Milwaukee, WI: 1,555,908—–22. Milwaukee: 1,576,143—22. Milwaukee: 1,576,236
23. Jacksonville, FL: 1,345,596-23. Jacksonville: 1,476,503–23. Jacksonville: 1,504,980
24. Grand Rapids: 988,938–24. Grand Rapids: 1,048,826-24. Grand Rapids: 1,059,113
25. Omaha, NE: 865,350————–25. Omaha: 924,003—-25. Omaha: 933,316
26. Dayton: 799,232——————–26. Dayton: 800,886—–26. Dayton: 803,416
27. Akron: 703,200———————27. Akron: 702,556——–27. Akron: 703,505
28. Wichita, KS: 630,919————-28. Madison: 647,432—28. Madison: 654,230
29. Toledo: 610,001——————29. Wichita: 644,680——29. Des Moines: 645,911
30. Madison, WI: 605,435———–30. Des Moines: 634,740—-30. Wichita: 645,628
31. Des Moines, IA: 569,633——-31. Toledo: 604,591——31. Toledo: 603,668
32. Youngstown: 565,773——32. Youngstown: 544,543—32. Youngstown: 541,926
33. Canton: 404,422——————33. Canton: 401,165—-33. Canton: 399,927

Columbus passed up Cleveland to become Ohio’s 2nd largest metro.

Metro Area Total Growth Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017—————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Austin, TX: +399,507———————————–1. Orlando: +56,498
2. Orlando, FL: +375,432———————————2. Austin: +55,269
3. San Antonio, TX: +331,458—————————3. Charlotte: +49,786
4. Charlotte, NC: +308,313——————————-4. San Antonio: +47,763
5. Las Vegas, NV: +252,810—————————–5. Las Vegas: +47,355
6. Minneapolis, MN: +251,760————————–6. Minneapolis: +43,342
7. Nashville, TN: +232,162——————————-7. Nashville: +34,190
8. Portland, OR: +227,167——————————-8. Columbus: +31,748
9. Columbus: +176,724———————————–9. Portland: +30,066
10. Sacramento, CA: +175,740————————10. Sacramento: +29,651
11. San Jose, CA: +161,523—————————-11. Jacksonville: +28,477
12. Jacksonville, FL: +159,382————————-12. Indianapolis: +23,002
13. Indianapolis, IN: +140,524————————-13. Kansas City: +22,530
14. Kansas City, MO: +119,574————————14. Cincinnati: +13,053
15. Des Moines, IA: +76,278—————————15. Des Moines: +11,171
16. Chicago, IL: +71,499——————————–16. Grand Rapids: +10,287
17. Grand Rapids, MI: +70,173————————17. Omaha: +9,313
18. Omaha, NE: +67,960——————————–18. San Jose: +7,533
19. Cincinnati: +64,396———————————–19. Detroit: +7,133
20. Madison, WI: +48,802——————————-20. Madison: +6,798
21. Virginia Beach, VA: +48,429———————-21. Providence: +5,244
22. Milwaukee, WI: +20,282—————————22. Dayton: +2,530
23. Providence, RI: +19,912————————–23. Virginia Beach: +2,480
24. St. Louis, MO: +19,575—————————24. Akron: +949
25. Detroit, MI: +16,685——————————-25. Wichita: +948
26. Wichita, KS: +14,704——————————26. St. Louis: +556
27. Dayton: +4,165————————————-27. Milwaukee: +93
28. Akron: +302—————————————–28. Toledo: -923
29. Canton: -4,501————————————-29. Cleveland: -1,221
30. Toledo: -6,334————————————-30. Canton: -1,238
31. Cleveland: -18,427——————————-31. Youngstown: -2,617
32. Pittsburgh, PA: -22,924————————-32. Pittsburgh: -8,169
33. Youngstown: -23,873—————————-33. Chicago: -13,286

Now, as done with counties, let’s look at the components of population change for metro areas.

Total Births By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Chicago: +869,178—————————————-1. Chicago: +115,915
2. Detroit: +364,121———————————————-2. Detroit: +49,940
3. Minneapolis: +331,430————————————–3. Minneapolis: +45,810
4. St. Louis: +246,280——————————————4. San Antonio: +34,318
5. San Antonio: +236,348————————————–5. St. Louis: +33,143
6. Charlotte: +217,525——————————————6. Charlotte: +31,315
7. Portland: +201,872——————————————-7. Orlando: +29,173
8. Orlando: +200,843——————————————-8. Portland: +28,220
9. Kansas City: +200,535————————————–9. Columbus: +27,663
10. Sacramento: +198,466————————————10. Kansas City: +27,565
11. Columbus: +197,185—————————————11. Las Vegas: +27,449
12. Cincinnati: +196,146—————————————12. Austin: +27,400
13. Las Vegas: +194,083————————————–13. Sacramento: +27,148
14. Indianapolis: +193,599————————————14. Cincinnati: +26,855
15. Austin: +188,961——————————————–15. Indianapolis: +26,769
16. San Jose: +176,224—————————————-16. Nashville: +24,690
17. Pittsburgh: +173,472—————————————17. San Jose: +23,826
18. Nashville: +170,824—————————————–18. Pittsburgh: +23,614
19. Cleveland: +168,361—————————————19. Cleveland: +22,873
20. Virginia Beach: +163,787———————————20. Milwaukee: +19,474
21. Milwaukee: +144,429————————————–21. Jacksonville: +18,748
22. Jacksonville: +130,339————————————22. Providence: +16,542
23. Providence: +120,526————————————-23. Grand Rapids: +13,548
24. Grand Rapids: +98,214———————————–24. Omaha: +13,421
25. Omaha: +96,558——————————————-25. Dayton: +9,615
26. Dayton: +69,855——————————————-26. Des Moines: +9,172
27. Wichita: +65,873——————————————27. Wichita: +8,694
28. Des Moines: +63,958————————————28. Madison: +7,400
29. Akron: +54,644——————————————–29. Toledo: +7,345
30. Toledo: +54,309——————————————-30. Akron: +7,342
31. Madison: +53,718—————————————-31. Virginia Beach: +5,935
32. Youngstown: +40,696———————————–32. Youngstown: +5,551
33. Canton: +32,199——————————————33. Canton: +4,434

Total Deaths By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Chicago: -501,469—————————————1. Chicago: -72,491
2. Detroit: -293,091—————————————–2. Detroit: -41,075
3. Pittsburgh: -197,572————————————3. Pittsburgh: -27,439
4. St. Louis: -186,111————————————–4. St. Louis: -26,755
5. Minneapolis: -161,913———————————5. Minneapolis: -23,527
6. Cleveland: -153,138———————————–6. Cleveland: -21,068
7. Cincinnati: -135,975———————————–7. Cincinnati: -19,515
8. Charlotte: -127,523————————————-8. Charlotte: -19,009
9. Portland: -120,590————————————–9. Orlando: -18,268
10. Sacramento: -120,429——————————10. Sacramento: -18,081
11. Kansas City: -119,748——————————11. Portland: -17,875
12. Orlando: -117,771———————————–12. San Antonio: -17,679
13. San Antonio: -117,289——————————13. Kansas City: -17,106
14. Indianapolis: -113,742——————————14. Las Vegas: -16,867
15. Columbus: -108,704——————————–15. Indianapolis: -16,081
16. Las Vegas: -108,003——————————–16. Columbus: -15,833
17. Providence: -107,920——————————-17. Providence: -15,031
18. Nashville: -99,415———————————–18. Nashville: -14,723
19. Virginia Beach: -97,935—————————-19. Milwaukee: -13,399
20. Milwaukee: -95,601———————————20. Jacksonville: -13,288
21. Jacksonville: -86,920——————————-21. San Jose: -11,360
22. San Jose: -73,507———————————–22. Austin: -10,609
23. Austin: -67,704—————————————23. Dayton: -8,359
24. Dayton: -59,736————————————-24. Grand Rapids: -7,674
25. Grand Rapids: -53,725—————————-25. Akron: -7,138
26. Akron: -50,948—————————————26. Youngstown: -6,821
27. Youngstown: -50,302——————————27. Omaha: -6,667
28. Omaha: -47,763————————————-28. Toledo: -5,968
29. Toledo: -42,313————————————-29. Wichita: -5,686
30. Wichita: -40,647————————————30. Des Moines: -4,631
31. Canton: -31,722————————————31. Canton: -4,366
32. Des Moines: -31,563——————————32. Madison: -4,252
33. Madison: -30,385———————————-33. Virginia Beach: -3,280

Total Net Natural Change (Births vs. Deaths) By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Chicago: +367,709—————————————1. Chicago: +43,424
2. Minneapolis: +169,517———————————–2. Minneapolis: +22,283
3. Austin: +121,257——————————————3. Austin: +16,791
4. San Antonio: +119,059———————————-4. San Antonio: +16,639
5. San Jose: +102,717————————————–5. San Jose: +12,466
6. Charlotte: +90,002—————————————-6. Charlotte: +12,306
7. Columbus: +88,481————————————–7. Columbus: +11,830
8. Las Vegas: +86,080————————————-8. Orlando: +10,905
9. Orlando: +83,072—————————————-9. Indianapolis: +10,688
10. Portland: +81,282————————————-10. Las Vegas: +10,582
11. Kansas City: +80,787———————————11. Kansas City: +10,459
12. Indianapolis: +79,857——————————–12. Portland: +10,345
13. Sacramento: +78,037——————————–13. Nashville: +9,967
14. Nashville: +71,409————————————14. Sacramento: +9,067
15. Detroit: +71,030—————————————15. Detroit: +8,865
16. Virginia Beach: +65,852—————————–16. Virginia Beach: +7,762
17. Cincinnati: +60,171———————————–17. Cincinnati: +7,340
18. St. Louis: +60,169————————————-18. Omaha: +6,754
19. Milwaukee: +48,828———————————-19. St. Louis: +6,388
20. Omaha: +48,795————————————–20. Grand Rapids: +5,874
21. Grand Rapids: +44,489—————————–21. Jacksonville: +5,460
22. Jacksonville: +43,419——————————-22. Des Moines: +4,541
23. Des Moines: +32,395——————————-23. Madison: +3,148
24. Wichita: +25,226————————————-24. Milwaukee: +6,075
25. Madison: +23,333———————————–25. Wichita: +3,008
26. Cleveland: +15,223——————————–26. Cleveland: +1,805
27. Providence: +12,606——————————27. Providence: +1,511
28. Toledo: +11,996———————————–28. Toledo: +1,377
29. Dayton: +10,119———————————-29. Dayton: +1,256
30. Akron: +3,696————————————–30. Akron: +204
31. Canton: +477—————————————31. Canton: +68
32. Youngstown: -9,606——————————-32. Youngstown: -1,270
33. Pittsburgh: -24,100——————————–33. Pittsburgh: -3,825

Total Domestic Migration By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Austin: +224,351—————————————–1. Charlotte: +31,102
2. Charlotte: +177,484————————————-2. Austin: +30,120
3. San Antonio: +169,684——————————–3. Las Vegas: +29,414
4. Orlando: +155,498————————————–4. San Antonio: +24,891
5. Nashville: +126,142————————————-5. Orlando: +23,321
6. Las Vegas: +119,742———————————-6. Jacksonville: +18,921
7. Portland: +106,839————————————-7. Nashville: +18,708
8. Jacksonville: +87,040———————————8. Portland: +13,384
9. Sacramento: +49,262———————————9. Sacramento: +12,888
10. Columbus: +42,932———————————10. Columbus: +12,562
11. Des Moines: +32,042——————————-11. Kansas City: +8,531
12. Indianapolis: +30,772——————————-12. Minneapolis: +8,095
13. Kansas City: +16,802——————————-13. Indianapolis: +7,763
14. Madison: +13,224————————————14. Des Moines: +4,812
15. Grand Rapids: +12,355—————————-15. Grand Rapids: +2,217
16. Omaha: +5,265—————————————16. Madison: +1,706
17. Minneapolis: +432———————————–17. Cincinnati: +1,541
18. Canton: -5,797—————————————-18. Omaha: +383
19. Akron: -13,427—————————————-19. Dayton: -346
20. Youngstown: -16,228——————————-20. Akron: -877
21. Dayton: -16,864————————————–21. Canton: -1,469
22. Wichita: -18,452————————————–22. Youngstown: -1,711
23. Cincinnati: -21,259———————————-23. Providence: -2,588
24. Toledo: -23,102————————————–24. Toledo: -3,070
25. Pittsburgh: -24,397———————————25. Wichita: -3,235
26. Providence: -33,335——————————-26. Virginia Beach: -4,706
27. Milwaukee: -50,575——————————–27. Cleveland: -8,008
28. Virginia Beach: -51,916—————————28. Pittsburgh: -8,633
29. Cleveland: -64,353——————————–29. Milwaukee: -9,635
30. St. Louis: -67,560———————————30. St. Louis: -8,828
31. San Jose: -73,026——————————–31. Detroit: -14,863
32. Detroit: -141,006———————————-32. San Jose: -25,729
33. Chicago: -479,482——————————–33. Chicago: -85,177

Total International Migration By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Chicago: +183,162—————————————1. Chicago: +28,302
2. Orlando: +135,860—————————————2. Orlando: +22,207
3. San Jose: +132,938————————————-3. San Jose: +20,747
4. Detroit: +86,366——————————————4. Detroit: +13,214
5. Minneapolis: +83,552———————————-5. Minneapolis: +13,107
6. Sacramento: +49,560———————————-6. Austin: +8,185
7. Austin: +49,311——————————————7. Sacramento: +7,722
8. Las Vegas: +46,411————————————8. Columbus: +7,350
9. Columbus: +45,744————————————9. Las Vegas: +7,221
10. Providence: +41,325——————————–10. Providence: +6,381
11. San Antonio: +40,953——————————-11. Portland: +6,335
12. Charlotte: +39,380———————————–12. Charlotte: +6,279
13. Portland: +38,542————————————13. San Antonio: +6,173
14. Virginia Beach: +34,619—————————-14. Nashville: +5,510
15. Nashville: +33,169———————————–15. Cleveland: +5,045
16. Cleveland: +31,236———————————-16. Indianapolis: +4,603
17. Indianapolis: +30,329——————————-17. Pittsburgh: +4,359
18. Jacksonville: +28,593——————————-18. Cincinnati: +4,285
19. St. Louis: +27,666————————————19. Jacksonville: +4,043
20. Pittsburgh: +27,300———————————20. St. Louis: +4,032
21. Cincinnati: +26,502———————————21. Milwaukee: +3,689
22. Kansas City: +23,098——————————22. Kansas City: +3,572
23. Milwaukee: +22,616——————————–23. Grand Rapids: +2,233
24. Omaha: +14,383————————————24. Omaha: +2,213
25. Grand Rapids: +13,800—————————25. Madison: +1,949
26. Madison: +12,367———————————-26. Des Moines: +1,807
27. Des Moines: +11,592—————————–27. Dayton: +1,654
28. Dayton: +11,230———————————–28. Akron: +1,647
29. Akron: +10,413————————————-29. Wichita: +1,187
30. Wichita: +8,117————————————-30. Virginia Beach: +1,077
31. Toledo: +4,627————————————-31. Toledo: +769
32. Youngstown: +2,171——————————32. Youngstown: +381
33. Canton: +1,118————————————33. Canton: +174

Total Net Migration By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Orlando: +291,358————————————–1. Orlando: +45,528
2. Austin: +273,662—————————————-2. Austin: +38,305
3. Charlotte: +216,864————————————3. Charlotte: +37,381
4. San Antonio: +210,637——————————–4. Las Vegas: +36,635
5. Las Vegas: +166,153———————————-5. San Antonio: +31,064
6. Nashville: +159,311————————————6. Nashville: +24,218
7. Portland: +145,381————————————7. Jacksonville: +22,964
8. Jacksonville: +115,633——————————-8. Minneapolis: +21,202
9. Sacramento: +98,822——————————–9. Sacramento: +20,610
10. Columbus: +88,676——————————–10. Columbus: +19,912
11. Minneapolis: +83,984——————————11. Portland: +19,719
12. Indianapolis: +61,101——————————12. Indianapolis: +12,366
13. San Jose: +59,912———————————-13. Kansas City: +12,103
14. Des Moines: +43,634——————————14. Des Moines: +6,619
15. Kansas City: +39,900——————————15. Cincinnati: +5,826
16. Grand Rapids: +26,155—————————16. Grand Rapids: +4,450
17. Madison: +25,591———————————-17. Providence: +3,793
18. Omaha: +19,648————————————18. Madison: +3,655
19. Providence: +7,990———————————19. Omaha: +2,596
20. Cincinnati: +5,243———————————-20. Dayton: +1,308
21. Pittsburgh: +2,903———————————-21. Akron: +770
22. Akron: -3,014—————————————-22. Canton: -1,295
23. Canton: -4,679————————————–23. Youngstown: -1,330
24. Dayton: -5,634————————————–24. Detroit: -1,649
25. Wichita: -10,335————————————25. Wichita: -2,048
26. Youngstown: -14,057—————————–26. Toledo: -2,301
27. Virginia Beach: -17,297————————–27. Cleveland: -2,963
28. Toledo: -18,475————————————28. Virginia Beach: -3,629
29. Milwaukee: -27,959——————————29. Pittsburgh: -4,274
30. Cleveland: -33,117——————————-30. San Jose: -4,982
31. St. Louis: -39,894———————————31. St. Louis: -5,796
32. Detroit: -54,640————————————32. Milwaukee: -5,946
33. Chicago: -296,320——————————-33. Chicago: -56,875




2017 Ohio County/Metro Population Estimates Part 1




Early this morning, the Census released the most recent population figures for counties, Metropolitan Statistical Areas and Consolidated Statistical Areas. The estimates cover the year from July 1, 2016 to July 1, 2017. For Part 1, we are going to take a look at counties.

Here are Ohio’s 88 counties and their population Census 2010, July 1, 2016 and July 1, 2017. The counties highlighted by color are as follows:
Akron Metro Counties
Canton  Metro Counties
Cincinnati Metro Counties (Ohio Only)
Cleveland Metro Counties
Columbus Metro Counties
Dayton Metro Counties
Toledo Metro Counties
Youngstown Metro Counties
Black are non-metro counties.

Census 2010——————————July 1, 2016————————-July 1, 2017
1. Cuyahoga: 1,280,122———–1. Franklin: 1,269,998———–1. Franklin: 1,291,981
2. Franklin: 1,163,414————2. Cuyahoga: 1,253,454——–2. Cuyahoga: 1,248,514
3. Hamilton: 802,374 ————–3. Hamilton: 810,087————-3. Hamilton: 813,822
4. Summit: 541,781—————-4. Summit: 540,394—————4. Summit: 541,228
5. Montgomery: 535,153——5. Montgomery: 531,395——–5. Montgomery: 530,604
6. Lucas: 441,815——————6. Lucas: 432,562—————–6. Lucas 430,887
7. Stark: 375,586——————-7. Butler: 377,933——————7. Butler: 380,604
8. Butler: 368,130——————8. Stark: 373,528——————8. Stark: 372,542
9. Lorain: 301,356—————–9. Lorain: 306,590——————9. Lorain: 307,924
10. Mahoning: 238,823———10. Mahoning: 230,169————10. Lake: 230,117
11. Lake: 230,041—————–11. Lake: 229,270——————11. Mahoning: 229,796
12. Warren: 212,693————-12. Warren: 226,476—————12. Warren: 228,882
13. Trumbull: 210,312———–13. Clermont: 203,016————13. Clermont: 204,214
14. Clermont: 197,363———–14. Trumbull: 201,701————-14. Delaware: 200,464
15. Delaware: 174,214———–15. Delaware: 196,777————15. Trumbull: 200,380
16. Medina: 172,332————-16. Medina: 176,903—————16. Medina: 178,371
17. Licking: 166,492————–17. Licking: 171,822—————17. Licking: 173,448
18. Greene: 161,573————–18. Greene: 165,109—————-18. Greene: 166,752
19. Portage: 161,419————-19. Portage: 162,162—————19. Portage: 162,277
20. Fairfield: 146,156————20. Fairfield: 152,681—————-20. Fairfield: 154,733
21. Clark: 138,333—————–21. Clark: 134,621——————–21. Clark: 134,557
22. Wood: 125,488—————22. Wood: 129,704——————-22. Wood: 130,492
23. Richland: 124,475————23. Richland: 121,167—————-23. Richland: 120,589
24. Wayne: 114,520————–24. Wayne: 116,422——————24. Wayne: 116,038
25. Columbiana: 107,841——-25. Miami: 104,382——————–25. Miami: 105,122
26. Allen: 106,331—————-26. Columbiana: 103,744————26. Allen: 103,198
27. Miami: 102,506————–27. Allen: 103,626——————27. Columbiana: 103,077
28. Ashtabula: 101,497———28. Ashtabula: 98,169————–28. Ashtabula: 97,807
29. Geauga: 93,389————-29. Geauga: 93,848—————–29. Geauga: 93,918
30. Tuscarawas: 92,582——–30. Tuscarawas: 92,485————30. Tuscarawas: 92,297
31. Muskingum: 86,074———31. Muskingum: 85,929————-31. Muskingum: 86,149
32. Scioto: 79,499—————-32. Ross: 76,910———————32. Ross: 77,313
33. Ross: 78,064—————–33. Scioto: 76,240——————–33. Scioto: 75,929
34. Erie: 77,079——————34. Hancock: 75,590—————–34. Hancock: 75,754
35. Hancock: 74,782————35. Erie: 74,944———————–35. Erie: 74,817
36. Belmont: 70,400————-36. Belmont: 68,568—————–36. Belmont: 68,029
37. Jefferson: 69,709————37. Jefferson: 66,914—————37. Athens: 66,597
38. Marion: 66,501—————38. Athens: 66,320——————38. Jefferson: 66,359
39. Athens: 64,757—————39. Marion: 65,334——————39. Marion: 64,967
40. Lawrence: 62,450———–40. Knox: 60,832———————40. Knox: 61,261
41. Washington: 61,778———41. Lawrence: 60,729————–41. Washington: 60,418
42. Sandusky: 60,944————42. Washington: 60,535———–42. Lawrence: 60,249
43. Knox: 60,921——————43. Sandusky: 59,281————–43. Sandusky: 59,195
44. Huron: 59,626—————–44. Huron: 58,391——————-44. Huron: 58,494
45. Seneca: 56,745—————45. Pickaway: 57,530—————45. Pickaway: 57,830
46. Pickaway: 55,698————-46. Union: 55,456——————-46. Union: 56,741
47. Ashland: 53,139—————47. Seneca: 55,357—————–47. Seneca: 55,243
48. Darke: 53,139—————–48. Ashland: 53,417—————–48. Ashland: 53,628
49. Union: 52,300——————49. Darke: 51,636——————-49. Darke: 51,536
50. Shelby: 49,423—————–50. Shelby: 48,726—————–50. Shelby: 48,759
51. Auglaize: 45,949————–51. Auglaize: 45,797—————-51. Auglaize: 45,778
52. Logan: 45,858—————–52. Logan: 45,171——————-52. Logan: 45,325
53. Brown: 44,846—————–53. Holmes: 43,832—————–53. Madison: 44,036
54. Crawford: 43,784————-54. Brown: 43,644——————-54. Holmes: 43,957
55. Highland: 43,589————-55. Madison: 43,354—————–55. Brown: 43,576
56. Madison: 43,435————-56. Highland: 42,993—————–56. Highland: 42,971
57. Fulton: 42,698—————-57. Fulton: 42,325——————–57. Fulton: 42,289
58. Holmes: 42,366————–58. Crawford: 42,037—————–58. Clinton: 42,009
59. Preble: 42,270—————-59. Clinton: 41,881——————-59. Crawford: 41,746
60. Clinton: 42,040—————60. Preble: 41,105——————–60. Preble: 41,120
61. Ottawa: 41,428—————61. Mercer: 40,710——————-61. Mercer: 40,873
62. Mercer: 40,814—————62. Ottawa: 40,495——————-62. Ottawa: 40,657
63. Champaign: 40,097———63. Guernsey: 39,200—————63. Guernsey: 39,093
64. Guernsey: 40,087———–64. Champaign: 38,737————-64. Champaign: 38,840
65. Defiance: 39,037————65. Defiance: 38,121—————–65. Defiance: 38,156
66. Williams: 37,642————66. Williams: 36,921——————66. Williams: 36,784
67. Coshocton: 36,901———-67. Coshocton: 36,644————-67. Coshocton: 36,544
68. Perry: 36,058—————–68. Perry: 36,019——————–68. Perry: 36,024
69. Morrow: 34,827————–69. Morrow: 34,827——————69. Morrow: 34,994
70. Putnam: 34,499————–70. Putnam: 34,016—————–70. Putnam: 33,878
71. Jackson: 33,225————-71. Jackson: 32,534—————–71. Jackson: 32,449
72. Hardin: 32,058—————72. Hardin: 31,407——————-72. Hardin: 31,364
73. Gallia: 30,934—————-73. Gallia: 29,996———————73. Gallia: 29,973
74. Hocking: 29,380————-74. Fayette: 28,662——————74. Fayette: 28,752
75. Fayette: 29,030————–75. Hocking: 28,386—————–75. Hocking: 28,474
76. Carroll: 28,836—————76. Pike: 28,237———————–76. Pike: 28,270
77. Van Wert: 28,744————77. Van Wert: 28,166—————-77. Van Wert: 28,217
78. Pike: 28,709——————-78. Adams: 27,832——————-78. Adams: 27,726
79. Adams: 28,550—————79. Carroll: 27,637——————–79. Carroll: 27,385
80. Henry: 28,215—————-80. Henry: 27,269———————80. Henry: 27,185
81. Meigs: 23,770—————-81. Meigs: 23,177———————81. Meigs: 23,080
82. Wyandot: 22,615————-82. Wyandot: 22,042—————-82. Wyandot: 22,029
83. Paulding: 19,614————83. Paulding: 18,839——————83. Paulding: 18,845
84. Harrison: 15,864————-84. Harrison: 15,257——————84. Harrison: 15,216
85. Morgan: 15,054————–85. Morgan: 14,762——————-85. Morgan: 14,709
86. Noble: 14,645—————–86. Noble: 14,443———————86. Noble: 14,406
87. Monroe: 14,642————–87. Monroe: 14,097——————–87. Monroe: 13,946
88. Vinton: 13,435—————-88. Vinton: 13,021———————88. Vinton: 13,092

Columbus’ counties tended to move up in the rankings 2010-2017.




Let’s now take a look at total growth for the periods July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017 and Census 2010 to July 1, 2017.

Census 2010-July 1, 2017————————-July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +128,452—————————–1. Franklin: +21,983
2. Delaware: +26,275—————————–2. Hamilton: +3,735
3. Warren: +16,049——————————–3. Delaware: +3,687
4. Butler: +12,474———————————-4. Butler: +2,671
5. Hamilton: +11,435——————————5. Warren: +2,406
6. Fairfield: +8,556——————————–6. Fairfield: +2,052
7. Licking: +6,956———————————7. Greene: +1,643
8. Clermont: +6,862——————————-8. Licking: +1,626
9. Lorain: +6,555———————————–9. Medina: +1,468
10. Medina: +6,038——————————-10. Lorain: +1,334
11. Greene: +5,178——————————-11. Union: +1,285
12. Wood: +5,003———————————12. Clermont: +1,198
13. Union: +4,482———————————13. Lake: +847
14. Miami: +2,621———————————14. Summit: +834
15. Pickaway: +2,152—————————–15. Wood: +788
16. Athens: +1,833——————————–16. Miami: +740
17. Holmes: +1,593——————————–17. Madison: +682
18. Wayne: +1,522———————————18. Knox: +429
19. Hancock: +965———————————19. Ross: +403
20. Portage: +856———————————-20. Pickaway: +300
21. Madison: +598———————————21. Athens: +277
22. Geauga: +508———————————-22. Muskingum: +220
23. Ashland: +489———————————23. Ashland: +211
24. Knox: +331————————————-24. Hancock: +164
25. Morrow: +167———————————25. Mercer: +163
26. Lake: +67————————————–26. Ottawa: +162
27. Muskingum: +63—————————–27. Logan: +154
28. Mercer: +59———————————-28. Montgomery: +147
29. Perry: -15————————————-29. Clinton: +128
30. Clinton: -28———————————–30. Holmes: +125
31. Auglaize: -171——————————-31. Portage: +115
32. Noble: -239———————————–32. Champaign: +103
33. Fayette: -273——————————–33. Huron: +103
34. Tuscarawas: -285————————–34. Fayette: +90
35. Vinton: -338———————————35. Hocking: +88
36. Morgan: -347——————————-36. Vinton: +71
37. Coshocton: -354—————————37. Geauga: +70
38. Fulton: -409———————————38. Van Wert: +51
39. Pike: -432———————————–39. Morrow: +40
40. Van Wert: -526—————————-40. Defiance: +35
41. Logan: -529———————————41. Pike: +33
42. Summit: -554——————————-42. Shelby: +33
43. Wyandot: -586——————————43. Preble: +15
44. Putnam: -618——————————-44. Paulding: +6
45. Highland: -629—————————–45. Perry: +5
46. Harrison: -646——————————46. Wyandot: -13
47. Shelby: -659——————————–47. Auglaize: -19
48. Meigs: -687———————————48. Highland: -22
49. Hardin: -696——————————–49. Gallia: -23
50. Monroe: -696——————————-50. Fulton: -36
51. Ross: -752———————————-51. Noble: -37
52. Paulding: -770——————————52. Harrison: -41
53. Jackson: -777——————————53. Hardin: -43
54. Ottawa: -777——————————-54. Morgan: -53
55. Adams: -826——————————-55. Clark: -64
56. Williams: -864—————————–56. Brown: -68
57. Defiance: -875—————————-57. Henry: -84
58. Hocking: -899—————————–58. Jackson: -85
59. Gallia: -973——————————–59. Sandusky: -86
60. Guernsey: -998————————–60. Meigs: -97
61. Henry: -1,030—————————–61. Coshocton: -100
62. Huron: -1,131—————————–62. Darke: -100
63. Preble: -1,139—————————-63. Adams: -106
64. Champaign: -1,253———————64. Guernsey: -107
65. Brown: -1,267—————————-65. Seneca: -114
66. Washington: -1,360———————66. Washington: -117
67. Darke: -1,433—————————-67. Erie: -127
68. Carroll: -1,451—————————68. Williams: -137
69. Seneca: -1,499————————-69. Putnam: -138
70. Marion: -1,534————————–70. Monroe: -151
71. Sandusky: -1,751———————-71. Tuscarawas: -188
72. Crawford: -2,039———————–72. Carroll: -252
73. Lawrence: -2,199———————-73. Crawford: -291
74. Erie: -2,249—————————–74. Scioto: -311
75. Belmont: -2,373————————75. Ashtabula: -362
76. Stark: -3,050—————————-76. Marion: -367
77. Allen: -3,128—————————-77. Mahoning: -373
78. Jefferson: -3,350———————-78. Wayne: -384
79. Scioto: -3,568————————–79. Allen: -428
80. Montgomery: -3,634——————80. Lawrence: -480
81. Ashtabula: -3,681———————81. Belmont: -539
82. Clark: -3,790—————————82. Jefferson: -555
83. Richland: -3,887———————-83. Richland: -578
84. Columbiana: -4,764——————84. Columbiana: -667
85. Mahoning: -9,011———————85. Stark: -986
86. Trumbull: -9,938———————-86. Trumbull: -1,321
87. Lucas: -10,928————————87. Lucas: -1,675
88. Cuyahoga: -31,595——————88. Cuyahoga: -4,940

Finally, let’s examine the components of population change, but top 15 only.

Top 15 Counties with the Most Births Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +134,9580———————————–1. Franklin: +19,039
2. Cuyahoga: +107,949———————————-2. Cuyahoga: +14,637
3. Hamilton: +79,087————————————-3. Hamilton: +10,787
4. Montgomery: +48,275——————————–4. Montgomery: +6,576
5. Summit: +44,151—————————————5. Summit: +5,945
6. Lucas: +40,874—————————————–6. Lucas: +5,494
7. Butler: +32,888—————————————–7. Butler: +4,531
8. Stark: +30,188——————————————8. Stark: +4,163
9. Lorain: +24,497—————————————-9. Lorain: +3,329
10. Warren: +17,492————————————-10. Mahoning: +2,382
11. Mahoning: +17,312———————————11. Warren: +2,376
12. Clermont: +16,980———————————-12. Clermont: +2,307
13. Lake: +16,465—————————————–13. Lake: +2,244
14. Delaware: +15,662———————————-14. Delaware: +2,146
15. Trumbull: +15,153———————————–15. Trumbull: +2,059

Top 15 Counties with the Fewest Births Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Noble: +1,020——————————————-1. Noble: +131
2. Morgan: +1,050—————————————–2. Monroe: +135
3. Vinton: +1,051——————————————-3. Morgan: +139
4. Monroe: +1,083—————————————–4. Vinton: +144
5. Harrison: +1,150—————————————-5. Harrison: +149
6. Paulding: +1,595—————————————-6. Paulding: +213
7. Meigs: +1,762——————————————-7. Meigs: +228
8. Wyandot: +1,849—————————————8. Wyandot: +240
9. Carroll: +2,011—————————————–9. Carroll: +271
10. Hocking: +2,282————————————-10. Henry: +291
11. Henry: +2,295—————————————–11. Hocking: +309
12. Van Wert: +2,373————————————-12. Adams: +322
13. Adams: +2,431—————————————-13. Pike: +328
14. Ottawa: +2,489—————————————-14. Van Wert: +328
15. Pike: +2,504——————————————–15. Ottawa: +334

Top 15 Counties with the Most Deaths Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Cuyahoga: -98,692———————————–1. Cuyahoga: -13,439
2. Franklin: -65,458————————————–2. Franklin: -9,542
3. Hamilton: -56,157————————————-3. Hamilton: -7,768
4. Montgomery: -42,353——————————-4. Montgomery: -5,883
5. Summit: -40,895————————————–5. Summit: -5,735
6. Lucas: -31,778—————————————-6. Lucas: -4,465
7. Stark: -29.531—————————————–7. Stark: -4,077
8. Butler: -22,747—————————————-8. Butler: -3,347
9. Mahoning: -22,021———————————–9. Lorain: -2,947
10. Lorain: -21,265————————————-10. Mahoning: -2,920
11. Trumbull: -18,189———————————-11. Trumbull: -2,459
12. Lake: -17,265—————————————-12. Lake: -2,444
13. Clark: -12,267—————————————-13. Warren: -1,785
14. Clermont: -11,924———————————-14. Clermont: -1,706
15. Warren: -11,411————————————-15. Clark: -1,680

Top 15 Counties with the Fewest Deaths Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Noble: -916————————————————1. Noble: -131
2. Vinton: -1,025———————————————2. Vinton: -147
3. Morgan: -1,215——————————————-3. Morgan: -152
4. Monroe: -1,260——————————————-4. Harrison: -186
5. Paulding: -1,405—————————————–5. Paulding: -186
6. Harrison: -1,449——————————————6. Monroe: -189
7. Wyandot: -1,756—————————————–7. Wyandot: -246
8. Meigs: -2,004———————————————8. Henry: -249
9. Henry: -2,007———————————————9. Carroll: -289
10. Hocking: -2,131—————————————10. Meigs: -290
11. Putnam: -2,153—————————————–11. Hocking: -294
12. Carroll: -2,191—————————————–12. Putnam: -303
13. Holmes: -2,191—————————————–13. Van Wert: -306
14. Van Wert: -2,275—————————————14. Morrow: -308
15. Hardin: -2,284——————————————-15. Fayette: -318

Top 15 Counties with the Highest Natural Increase (Births vs. Deaths) Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +69,500————————————-1. Franklin: +9,497
2. Hamilton: +22,930————————————2. Hamilton: +3,019
3. Butler: +10,141—————————————-3. Cuyahoga: +1,198
4. Cuyahoga: +9,257————————————4. Butler: +1,184
5. Lucas: +9,096——————————————5. Lucas: +1,029
6. Delaware: +8,339————————————-6. Delaware: +1,013
7. Warren: +6,081—————————————-7. Montgomery: +693
8. Montgomery: +5,922——————————–8. Clermont: +601
9. Clermont: +5,056————————————-9. Warren: +591
10. Holmes: +3,410————————————–10. Holmes: +445
11. Fairfield: +3,380————————————-11. Guernsey: +414
12. Wayne: +3,313—————————————12. Licking: +408
13. Summit: +3,256————————————-13. Wayne: +406
14. Lorain: +3,232—————————————14. Lorain: +382
15. Licking: +3,173————————————–15. Fairfield: +378

Top 15 Counties with the Lowest Natural Increase (Births vs. Deaths) Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Mahoning: -4,709—————————————1. Mahoning: -538
2. Trumbull: -3,036—————————————-2. Trumbull: -400
3. Jefferson: -2,097—————————————–3. Jefferson: -276
4. Belmont: -1,370——————————————4. Lake: -200
5. Erie: -990————————————————–5. Belmont: -197
6. Ottawa: -977———————————————-6. Ottawa: -171
7. Columbiana: -891—————————————7. Washington: -134
8. Washington: -829—————————————8. Erie: -132
9. Lake: -800———————————————–9. Columbiana: -130
10. Clark: -694———————————————10. Clark: -119
11. Scioto: -493——————————————–11. Scioto: -68
12. Crawford: -363—————————————-12.  Lawrence: -67
13. Ashtabula: -354—————————————13. Meigs: -62
14. Harrison: -299—————————————–14. Monroe: -54
15. Lawrence: -285—————————————15. Harrison: -37

Top 15 Counties with the Most Domestic Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +18,270———————————-1. Franklin: +5,861
2. Delaware: +15,671———————————2. Delaware: +2,346
3. Warren: +6,996————————————-3. Fairfield: +1,491
4. Fairfield: +4,106————————————4. Warren: +1,332
5. Licking: +3,332————————————-5. Licking: +1,137
6. Medina: +2,900————————————-6. Medina: +1,058
7. Union: +1,953—————————————7. Union: +871
8. Pickaway: +1,489———————————-8. Greene: +763
9. Wood: +1,447—————————————9. Lake: +748
10. Clermont: +1,372——————————–10. Butler: +668
11. Miami: +1,293————————————-11. Madison: +639
12. Ottawa: +224————————————–12. Miami: +547
13. Madison: +177————————————13. Clermont: +515
14. Morgan: -186————————————–14. Ross: +379
15. Lorain: -271—————————————-15. Ottawa: +337

Top 15 Counties with the Least Domestic Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Cuyahoga: -65,672————————————-1. Cuyahoga: -10,087
2. Hamilton: -25,292—————————————2. Lucas: -3,249
3. Lucas: -23,401——————————————-3. Montgomery: -1,656
4. Montgomery: -16,752———————————-4. Hamilton: -1,533
5. Summit: -10,630—————————————–5. Stark: -1,232
6. Trumbull: -6,852—————————————–6. Trumbull: -923
7. Mahoning: -6,113—————————————7. Wayne: -897
8. Allen: -4,673———————————————–8. Allen: -618
9. Stark: -4,510———————————————-9. Richland: -613
10. Richland: -4,240—————————————-10. Columbiana: -528
11. Columbiana: -3,802————————————11. Portage: -425
12. Ashtabula: -3,779—————————————12. Ashtabula: -412
13. Scioto: -3,267——————————————–13. Lawrence: -392
14. Clark: -3,198———————————————14. Marion: -389
15. Portage: -2,797—————————————–15. Tuscarawas: -382

Top 15 Counties with the Most International Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +40,914—————————————1. Franklin: +6,584
2. Cuyahoga: +24,799————————————2. Cuyahoga: +3,961
3. Hamilton: +14,063————————————–3. Hamilton: +2,288
4. Montgomery: +7,418————————————4. Montgomery: +1,131
5. Summit: +7,132——————————————5. Summit: +1,101
6. Butler: +5,226——————————————–6. Butler: +839
7. Lorain: +3,810——————————————–7. Lorain: +641
8. Greene: +3,443——————————————8. Portage: +546
9. Portage: +3,281—————————————–9. Lucas: +539
10. Lucas: +3,247——————————————10. Warren: +499
11. Warren: +3,140—————————————-11. Greene: +473
12. Delaware: +2,178————————————-12. Delaware: +336
13. Athens: +2,081—————————————–13. Athens: +326
14. Mahoning: +1,917————————————-14. Mahoning: +326
15. Lake: +1,740——————————————–15. Lake: +314

Top 15 Counties with the Least International Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Lawrence: -168——————————————1. Lawrence: -19
2. Belmont: -113——————————————–2. Belmont: -18
3. Jefferson: -108——————————————-3. Jefferson: -16
4. Columbiana: -44—————————————–4. Columbiana: -7
5. Williams: -40———————————————-5. Williams: -6
6. Brown: -39————————————————6. Brown: -4
7. Holmes: -16———————————————–7. Holmes: -3
8. Monroe: -5————————————————8. Monroe: -1
9. Vinton: -2————————————————–9. Van Wert: -1
10. Meigs: 0————————————————10. Harrison: 0
11. Trumbull: +2——————————————-11. Ottawa: 0
12. Harrison: +4——————————————-12. Vinton: 0
13. Adams: +7———————————————13. Meigs: +1
14. Van Wert: +10—————————————-14. Noble: +1
15. Noble: +10——————————————–15. Pike: +1
16. Morgan: +10

Top 15 Counties with the Most Net Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +59,184—————————————1. Franklin: +12,445
2. Delaware: +17,849————————————–2. Delaware: +2,682
3. Warren: +10,136—————————————-3. Warren: +1,831
4. Fairfield: +5,274—————————————–4. Fairfield: +1,686
5. Licking: +3,928——————————————5. Butler: +1,507
6. Lorain: +3,539——————————————–6. Greene: +1,236
7. Medina: +3,492——————————————-7. Licking: +1,225
8. Wood: +2,720———————————————8. Medina: +1,142
9. Butler: +2,527——————————————–9. Lake: +1,062
10. Union: +2,415—————————————–10. Lorain: +969
11. Greene: +2,038—————————————-11. Union: +952
12. Clermont: +1,975————————————-12. Hamilton: +755
13. Miami: +1,662——————————————-13. Madison: +679
14. Pickaway: +1,556————————————-14. Summit: +649
15. Athens: +1,285——————————————15. Clermont +609

Top 15 Counties with the Least Net Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Cuyahoga: -40,873————————————1. Cuyahoga: -6,126
2. Lucas: -20,154——————————————2. Lucas: -2,710
3. Hamilton: -11,229————————————–3. Stark: -1,061
4. Montgomery: -9,334———————————–4. Trumbull: -918
5. Trumbull: -6,850—————————————-5. Wayne: -794
6. Allen: -4,504———————————————6. Allen: -596
7. Mahoning: -4,196————————————–7. Richland: -587
8. Richland: -4,087—————————————-8. Columbiana: -535
9. Columbiana: -3,846————————————9. Montgomery: -525
10. Summit: -3,496—————————————-10. Lawrence: -411
11. Stark: -3,408——————————————-11. Marion: -379
12. Ashtabula: -3,327————————————-12. Belmont: -341
13. Scioto: -3,064——————————————13. Ashtabula: -336
14. Clark: -3,032——————————————–14. Tuscarawas: -326
15. Huron: -2,359——————————————-15. Holmes: -319

So there you have it for counties.  Part 2 on Metro and CSAs will be coming soon!




Winter 2017-2018




The winter of 2017-2018 featured some wild swings, from a very cold late December-early January to one of the warmest Februarys of all time. Let’s take a closer look at this volatile season, specifically December to February.

December 2017
Average High: 38.6 36th Coldest
Average Low: 23.7 33rd Coldest
Mean: 31.2 37th Coldest
Coldest High: 17 on 12/27/17
Coldest Low: 2 on 12/31/17
Warmest High: 60 on 12/4/17
Warmest Low: 47 on 12/22/17
32 or Below Highs: 10 11th Highest
32 or Below Lows: 27 5th Highest
Total Precipitation: 1.76″ 28th Driest
Total Snowfall: 8.1″ 23rd Snowiest
Average Snow Depth: 0.3″ 4th Lowest
Largest Daily Precipitation: 0.72″ on 12/23/17 31st Largest
Largest Daily Snowfall: 2.1″ on 12/30/17 32nd Largest
Highest Snow Depth: 3″ on 12/30-12/31/17 4th Lowest
Precipitation Days: 20 8th Highest
Snowfall Days: 15 8th Highest

December Records
Record High Minimum: 47 on 12/22/17. Tied for #1 Warmest Low for December 22nd. Tied with 2015.

January 2018
Average High: 35.4 39th Coldest
Average Low: 19.3 39th Coldest
Mean: 27.3 39th Coldest
Coldest High: 10 on 1/2/18
Coldest Low: -4 on 1/2/18
Warmest High: 60 on 1/11 and 1/22/18
Warmest Low: 52 on 1/11/18
32 or Below Highs: 14 11th Highest
32 or Below Lows: 26 6th Highest
Total Precipitation: 2.39″ 56th Driest
Total Snowfall: 10.5″ 38th Snowiest
Average Snow Depth: 1.4″ 15th Lowest
Largest Daily Precipitation: 0.66″ on 1/12/18 35th Lowest
Largest Daily Snowfall: 3.5″ on 1/12/18 29th Highest
Highest Snow Depth: 5″ on 1/16-1/17/18 6th Lowest
Precipitation Days: 26 4th Highest
Snowfall Days: 19 6th Highest

January Records
Record Low Maximum: 10 on 1/2/2018. Coldest High for January 2nd, beating the old record of 11, set in 1928.

February 2018
Average High: 47.3 7th Warmest
Average Low: 30.3 10th Warmest
Mean: 38.8 7th Warmest
Coldest High: 22 on 2/2/18
Coldest Low: 10 on 2/5/18
Warmest High: 77 on 2/20/18
Warmest Low: 60 on 2/20/18
32 or Below Highs: 5 6th Lowest
32 or Below Lows: 17 5th Lowest
Total Precipitation: 5.25″ 7th Highest
Total Snowfall: 6.0″ 43rd Highest
Largest Daily Precipitation: 1.23″ on 2/24/18 20th Highest
Largest Daily Snowfall: 4.4″ on 2/7/18. 17th Highest
Highest Snow Depth: 4″ on 2/7/18. 5th Lowest
Precipitation Days: 20 7th Highest
Snowfall Days: 10 13th Highest

February Records
Record Daily Snowfall: 4.4″ on 2/7/2018. Most snowfall for February 7th, beating the old record of 3.6″ set in 1895.
Record High Minimum: 55 on 2/15/2018. Warmest Low for February 15th, beating the old record of 53 set in 1954.
Record High Maximum: 77 on 2/20/2018. Warmest High for February 20th, beating the old record of 68 set in 1891 and 2016.
Record High Minimum: 60 on 2/20/2018. Warmest Low for February 20th, beating the old record of 49 set in 1930.

Winter (DJF only) 2017-2018
Average High: 40.4 28th Warmest
Average Low: 24.4 38th Warmest
Mean: 32.4 33rd Warmest
32 or Below Highs: 29 21st Highest
32 or Below Lows: 70 18th Lowest
Precipitation: 9.40″ 31st Wettest
Snowfall: 24.6″ 36th Snowiest
Average Snow Depth: 0.7″ 17th Highest (since 1948)

So overall, the winter was definitely warmer than normal, but not record-breaking, even with the extremely warm February. It was also wetter and snowier than normal as well.

Near white-out conditions on the evening of January 12th, 2018

Oh Clintonville… The Queen of NIMBYism




Clintonville has long been making news for its near hysterical opposition to any change whatsoever. The fight over the North Broadway turn lane has become something of legend, and the neighborhood freak outs over everything from the Indianola Avenue road diet to the Olympic Pool saga have become nearly standard procedure.
This week, Clintonville’s notorious NIMBYism once again popped its ugly head in the news, this time about Columbus’ plan to install rain gardens in the neighborhood.

The story is a classic.

First, let’s look at some of the backstory to this outrage. All the way back in 2005, Columbus submitted a plan to the Ohio EPA called the Wet Weather Management Plan. The gist of the plan was the actions the city would take to reduce sewage overflows into rivers and streams during heavy rains, as well as reducing pollution runoff. For years, heavy rains would cause sewers to back up into the Scioto and Olentangy rivers, as well as causing pollution runoff from streets, parking lots and other surfaces. At times, this pollution would cause very unpleasant odors throughout the Downtown area, as well as along the rivers themselves. Coinciding with the city’s desire to create a more inviting riverfront (which it would later do with the Scioto Mile and Scioto Greenways projects), it had to create infrastructure to solve the pollution issues.
One of the biggest ways this was accomplished was by drilling a 5.4 mile tunnel under Downtown that would fully prevent all of the sewage overflows. Begun in 2007, the project took 8 years and $371 million to complete. You can read a bit more about that project here: http://www.dispatch.com/article/20150912/NEWS/309129781
In 2015, when the overflow problem was solved, the city came up with an updated plan called Blueprint Columbus. This plan continued to address runoff problems, specifically with the creation of a network of rain gardens throughout the city. If you’re unaware, rain gardens are basically special, landscaped ditches that function as water filters. They block runoff and help prevent flooding, and would potentially save the city millions of dollars in the long run. Check out the Blueprint Columbus plan here: https://www.columbus.gov/utilities/projects/blueprint/ There’s a ton of information there, including the locations of many of the proposed rain gardens… which brings us back to Clintonville. In 2016, Clintonville found out it would be hosting as many as 500 rain gardens in the initial pilot rollout that will eventually include 17 areas of the city: http://www.dispatch.com/article/20160110/NEWS/301109834
Almost immediately, the complaints began to pour in. At meetings during the summer of 2015, residents had already begun the fear-mongering outrage. It wasn’t until this year, however, that Clintonville really began to earn that long-standing reputation. Construction of the rain gardens began over the summer, and they not only were built in the grassy easements in front of houses, but some were built right into the street, removing parking spaces and creating zones where traffic would be forced to slow down. Residents were apoplectic.

Keep in mind, these are some examples of a typical rain garden:

Not so bad, right? And if they help clean the water, reduce flooding costs and beautify the neighborhood, what’s the problem? Plenty, according to Clintonville residents.

http://stagenc.build.dispatch.com/news/20171016/some-residents-dont-like-them-but-columbus-says-rain-gardens-are-working
In the Dispatch article, residents called them everything from “unsightly” to “toxic dumps”, while another article, http://www.thisweeknews.com/news/20171016/over-my-dead-body-rain-garden-rage-continues called them an outrageous example of big government overreach, as well as a potential danger to toddlers.

My favorite comment, however, was this one:
“That’s a real problem, that this is an experiment,” he said. “If they want to do an experiment, do it somewhere else — not on these homes. I am seriously considering moving.”

If that isn’t the epitome of irrational NIMBYism, I don’t know what is. Ironically, should that resident move, he’d have absolutely no trouble selling it. Clintonville is an urban neighborhood in a growing, desirable city. Given the record low housing inventory for sale in the area, he’d probably get top dollar for it.

As for why Clintonville is so irrationally opposed to any and all change? Perhaps because it has long been an insular community. Demographics there have been one of the steadiest in the county, let alone the city. It is among the least diverse and has one of the highest median ages of neighborhood populations in the city by far, even including suburbs. Things simply don’t change there, and many seem to vehemently want it to stay that way. However, change is always inevitable. Perhaps Clintonville should save its energy for *actual* nefarious practices, not imagined ones.

Happy Eclipse Day! A History of Eclipses in Columbus

In honor of today’s historic “Great American Eclipse”, I thought it might be interesting to take a look at both eclipses that have affected the area in years past, as well as those that will come long into the future.

Solar eclipses are not as unusual as people think, but to have the sun mostly or completely covered in any particular area IS relatively rare. In Columbus, that is no exception. Looking back in time to 1900, here are Columbus’ greatest solar eclipses. Only those solar eclipses with at least 75% coverage will be detailed. For maps, animated recreations, etc., follow the links.

1900-1909
Total Solar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 4
Total Solar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 1
Total Solar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 0
Total Lunar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 15
Total Lunar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 5
Total Lunar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 4

May 28, 1900 Solar Eclipse: 7:43AM-10:07AM
This eclipse was the most significant of the 1900-1909 decade for Columbus. The path of totality entered the United States around Brownsville, Texas, crossed New Orleans, went just south of Atlanta and left the country at Virginia Beach, Virginia. In Columbus, maximum coverage reached 82.58%.
https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/in/usa/columbus?iso=19000528

1910-1919
Total Solar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 6
Total Solar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 0
Total Solar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 0
Total Lunar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 15
Total Lunar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 7
Total Lunar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 5

June 8, 1918 Solar Eclipse: 6:28PM-8:22PM
This eclipse’s path of totality is somewhat similar to August 21, 2017, only a few hundred miles to further south. Path of totality entered the US in southern Washington state, moved across Denver, just north of Oklahoma City to central Mississippi and northern Florida. In Columbus, maximum coverage reached 72.58%, making this the most significant solar eclipse of the 1910s.
https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/in/usa/columbus?iso=19180608

1920-1929
Total Solar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 3
Total Solar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 1
Total Solar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 0
Total Lunar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 16
Total Lunar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 5
Total Lunar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 4

January 24, 1925 Solar Eclipse: 7:52AM-10:12AM
Path of totality for this eclipse began in northern Minnesota, crossed northern Michigan, Buffalo and then over Long Island, New York. In Columbus, coverage reached 92.79%, the highest of any solar eclipse in the 20th Century.
https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/in/usa/columbus?iso=19250124

1930-1939
Total Solar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 4
Total Solar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 1
Total Solar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 0
Total Lunar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 13
Total Lunar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 4
Total Lunar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 3

August 31, 1932 Solar Eclipse: 3:15PM-5:36PM
The path of totality on this eclipse was somewhat unusual, moving south out of northern Canada over Montreal and then just east of Boston. In Columbus, coverage reached 79.31%, the highest during the 1930s.
https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/in/usa/columbus?iso=19320831

1940-1949
Total Solar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 4
Total Solar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 0
Total Solar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 0
Total Lunar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 14
Total Lunar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 6
Total Lunar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 5

April 7, 1940 Solar Eclipse: 3:39PM-6:12PM
While there were no solar eclipses during the 1940s that reached at least 75% coverage in Columbus, the most significant during the decade did reach 61.86% coverage. The path of totality for this eclipse was in the Deep South, crossing into the US in central Texas and then riding along the Gulf Coast until it exited around Jacksonville, Florida.
https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/in/usa/columbus?iso=19400407

1950-1959
Total Solar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 3
Total Solar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 2
Total Solar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 0
Total Lunar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 15
Total Lunar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 4
Total Lunar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 4

September 1, 1951 Solar Eclipse: 6:01AM-8:05AM
Because this eclipse began in the morning, the first half was not visible, and the maximum coverage in Columbus, at 81.58% and the greatest during the decade, occurred just as the sun was rising on the horizon, so it was poor viewing overall. Path of totality began in far eastern Tennessee and moved out of the US at Virginia Beach, Virginia.
https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/in/usa/columbus?iso=19510901

June 30, 1954 Solar Eclipse: 6:06AM-7:56AM
As with the eclipse in 1951, this one began early in the morning, so the first half was not visible. Viewing was slightly better than in 1951, as maximum occurred while the sun was over the horizon, but because it was still low, one needed a clear eastern view to really see it. In Columbus, maximum reached 76.59%, second best of the decade. Path of totality for this eclipse began in north-central Nebraska and moved northeast over Minneapolis and then into Canada and off northern Newfoundland.
https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/in/usa/columbus?iso=19540630

1960-1969
Total Solar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 4
Total Solar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 0
Total Solar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 0
Total Lunar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 16
Total Lunar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 9
Total Lunar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 8

July 20, 1963 Solar Eclipse: 4:34PM-6:49PM
This eclipse’s totality path was almost entirely in Canada, only entering the US briefly in Maine. In Columbus, coverage reached 72.41%, the maximum of any solar eclipse during the 1960s.
https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/in/usa/columbus?iso=19630720

1970-1979
Total Solar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 6
Total Solar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 1
Total Solar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 0
Total Lunar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 13
Total Lunar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 5
Total Lunar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 5

March 7, 1970 Solar Eclipse: 12:12PM-2:43PM
Path of totality moved north through the panhandle of Florid and then along the East Coast before exiting the US at Virginia Beach, Virginia (they seem to be in a lot of eclipse paths). In Columbus, maximum reached 79.10%, the most in the 1970s.
https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/in/usa/columbus?iso=19700307

1980-1989
Total Solar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 2
Total Solar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 1
Total Solar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 0
Total Lunar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 13
Total Lunar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 3
Total Lunar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 3

May 30, 1984 Solar Eclipse: 11:09AM-2:08PM
The 1980s had very few solar eclipses, but it did have one of the 20th Century’s best for Columbus. Path of totality was unusually narrow for this eclipse, but the 90%+ coverage was very wide. Totality went from just north of New Orleans over Atlanta and off the coast of Maryland. In Columbus, coverage reached 82.44%, a top 5 of the century.
https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/in/usa/columbus?iso=19840530

1990-1999
Total Solar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 3
Total Solar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 1
Total Solar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 0
Total Lunar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 16
Total Lunar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 5
Total Lunar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 4

May 10, 1994 Solar Eclipse: 11:28AM-3:00PM
For me, this is the only eclipse I can remember experiencing. Path of totality went northeast from southern New Mexico through northern Ohio and off of Maine and Nova Scotia. In Columbus, coverage reached 87.48% and was the 2nd highest of the 20th Century. This was also the only solar eclipse of the century where the path of totality entered Ohio.
https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/in/usa/columbus?iso=19940510

2000-2009
Total Solar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 4
Total Solar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 0
Total Solar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 0
Total Lunar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 14
Total Lunar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 7
Total Lunar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 7

No significant eclipses occurred in Columbus during the 2000s. The most significant was December 25, 2000, when coverage reached just 42.42%

2010-2019
Total Solar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 3
Total Solar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 1
Total Solar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 0
Total Lunar Eclipses that affected Columbus: 15
Total Lunar Eclipses with at least 75% coverage: 6
Total Lunar Eclipses with 100% coverage: 5

August 21, 2017 Solar Eclipse: 1:04PM-3:52PM
The most significant eclipse so far this century, the “Great American Eclipse” is the first one to transit across the US west to east since 1898. Path of totality enters the US in Oregon and crosses Kansas City, St. Louis and Nashville before exiting the country over Charleston, South Carolina. In Columbus, it will be the most significant solar eclipse since 1994 and the 3rd best since 1900, with 86.55% coverage.
https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/in/usa/columbus?iso=20170821

Significant Future Solar Eclipses

April 8, 2024 Solar Eclipse: 1:55PM-4:26PM
This eclipse will be Columbus’ greatest at any time in the next 200 years. In the city itself, coverage will reach 99.88%, and one wouldn’t have to go very far northwest to see 100%.
https://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/in/usa/columbus?iso=20240408

After 2024, there are no eclipses that reach even 75% coverage until June 11, 2048, and none 80% or higher until May 11, 2078, and none over 90% until July 23, 2093. So enjoy today’s and the one 7 years from now, because after that, you’ll be waiting a very long time for another.