The Week in Review #2

So last week, the FBI finally released the full crime numbers for 2017 for all cities. How did Columbus fare? Well, it was a decidedly mixed bag. Total murders were their highest ever, at 143, but the rate fell quite short of the record set back in 1991. So far for 2018, murder is behind 2017’s rate by about 22%, so it’s a good improvement, but still not even close to where it should be.

Other violent crime figures 2016 to 2017
-Rape continued its multi-year rise in the city, reaching 919 incidents. This was a 6% increase over 2016.
-Assaults were up 4% over 2016, but in the context of still being one of the lowest totals in the past 30 years.
-Robberies were down almost 8.5% over 2016.
-Despite the rises in most types of violent crime, the drop in robberies meant overall violent crime dropped by about 0.5%.
Property crime figures 2016 to 2017
-Burglaries were down more than 8%.
-Larceny thefts were down about 2.9%
-Motor vehicle thefts were up 17.6%, so not a good trend, but still less than half the rate it was 15-20 years ago.
-Overall property crime was down about 2% versus 2016.

And if you think this year’s been particularly wet, you are right! Through October 1st, Columbus is having its 3rd wettest year on record. Only 1882 and 1890 are ahead of 2018 at this point, and by barely 1″. 2018 at this point is running almost 14″ above normal.
Top 10 Wettest Years Through October 1st
1. 1882: 44.55″
2. 1890: 43.56″
3. 2018: 43.31″
4. 1979: 42.17″
5. 2003: 41.58″
6. 2011: 41.12″
7. 1990: 39.10″
8. 1949: 38.54″
9. 2004: 38.46″
10. 1996: 37.46″
It is surprising how many recent years are on this list. Still with 3 months to go, the pattern could break, but it’s very unlikely that 2018 doesn’t end up in the top 10. Here are the top 10 wettest full years.
1. 2011: 54.96″
2. 1990: 53.16″
3. 1882: 51.30″
4. 1890: 50.73″
5. 2004: 49.27″
6. 1979: 49.17″
7. 2003: 49.03″
8. 1883: 48.88″
9. 1881: 46.99″
10. 2017: 46.61″

Guess it could always be worse.

August’s Missed (and Gained) Opportunities of the Month




Instead of focusing on a single project this month, I wanted to do a rundown of a few projects- this time both good and bad.

First, the bad.

High and Cherry Street Project
In what’s becoming a tradition for Downtown, yet another project there has been inexplicably downsized. Originally approved back in 2016, the project required the demolition of a historic building.

This was generally considered okay because the proposed 11-story project was a significant improvement in density that would’ve added more vibrancy to this part of Downtown.

The original proposal.


2 years later and, beyond the demolition, there had been no movement on the site, which was itself a little concerning because that typically means that something’s gone wrong or there are about to be big changes for the project. So it was no surprise when, toward the end of July, we received the bad news. Not only was the project going to be reduced in size by a full 4 stories, but all aspects of the project were getting worse. Parking spaces doubled, bike parking spaces were reduced by 70% to just 18, the ground floor retail was completely eliminated and overall residential units fell by 50 to just 70 total. Worse still, even the design of the building became just another bland box.

So what happened? Crawford-Hoying, the developer, made some reference to rising material costs that made its plan to include affordable, micro-unit apartments too expensive, hence the reduction in project size. However, this excuse seems suspicious at best. If higher material costs were a detriment to building the affordable component, why not simply lower the number of micro units or change to a market-rate project altogether? Furthermore, what would that have to do with eliminating the retail space or increasing parking? It wouldn’t. In fact, building parking is actually very expensive, and it’s why many cities nationally are reducing or eliminating parking requirements for new projects, as it is often prohibitively expensive to build and can derail quality urban proposals. If finances were tight, the last thing a developer would do with a new project is add MORE parking rather than trying to maximize potential income with residential units or retail space. Meanwhile, in the month since the project reduction was announced, we have seen other new projects announced or previously-announced projects move forward that have seen no reduction. The company also didn’t make any changes to its 10-story Moxy Hotel project at 800 N. High street, which is currently under construction. Overall, this just feels like a bait and switch. The 11-story proposal was approved, which allowed for the demolition, and now it’s coming in smaller and of a lower quality.
Regardless of the real reasons why this project was suburbanized and reduced, it continues the long-standing pattern of Downtown projects being underwhelming. Downtown should be receiving the the statement makers, so to speak. Instead, we continue to see other neighborhoods get them.

Speaking of, let’s look at the good with a couple of proposals that have matched, if not exceeded, their potential.

Upper Arlington’s Arlington Gateway
Proposed back in 2016 as a 7-story mixed-use building, the project has gone through many revisions. Over the course of the last 2 years, the project has only grown in size to its final iteration, an 11-story with more than 200 apartments, office space and retail. The $100 million project is the largest ever proposed for Upper Arlington, which has long been a more traditional suburban-style inner suburb. It has resisted the urban densification movement until recently. Being landlocked, the only way that it can increase population and maintain tax levels is to build up. Its city leadership seems to understand this, and though there was neighborhood opposition to the project, the city approved it almost unanimously.

The project will replace suburban development, including a strip center and Pizza Hut, as seen below.

Quality urbanism, increased walkability… this is a solid addition to Upper Arlington.

Franklinton’s Gravity 2.0
Franklinton is seeing a revival these days, particularly east of 315. Multiple projects have been proposed, and the upcoming Scioto Peninsula redevelopment is on the horizon. Kaufman Development, highlighted in last month’s Missed Opportunity for having to abandon a project in Victorian Village due to NIMBYism, has been on somewhat of a roll lately. It spearheaded a significant renovation of the famed LeVeque Tower, it built both of Downtown’s largest recent projects- 250 High and 80 on the Commons (the latter of which was, of course, downsized)- and it’s heavily investing in the future of Franklinton with a stunning, out-of-the-box development named Gravity.
Gravity 1.0 was proposed back in 2016 as a 6-story, mixed-use development at 500 W. Broad Street in Franklinton. Innovative in design, the project included amenities like a climbing wall, outdoor movie theater, yoga plaza, lots of public art, a dog park, biergarten and more.

Gravity 1.0



Replacing a few single-story, non-historic buildings and some parking lots (as seen above), the project was designed to drastically change the existing streetscape. It began construction in late 2016 and is nearing completion now. Few anticipated a second phase of the project, however, dubbed Gravity 2.0
Announced last week, Gravity 2.0 would be much more massive in scale than 1.0. Proposed for the entire block directly across the street between W. Broad and W. State, the project would include the following:
– A 12-story mixed-use building at the northeast corner of the site, directly to the west of the railroad tracks.
– A 6-story residential building on the Stat Street.
– A 5-story parking garage.
– A 6-story mixed-use addition to the existing Murphy building, which will be renovated.
– A 5-story townhouse building along McDowell Street.
– A renovation to the existing Solazzo Building at the southwest corner.
Like Gravity 1.0, the project will include different types of amenities than would be typically found. These include a green roof on the parking garage with a “city view overlook”, as well as an art walk through the lower floor of the garage. Along Broad Street, a retail plaza will be constructed out of shipping containers. Co-living will be included in the southern residential building. A food hall, brewery and restaurants are also potentially in the works. Overall, the architecture will match the funky modernism of Gravity 1.0.
There is no word yet on exactly how many residential units the entire site will include, or how much retail and office space. Those details should be released in the coming months.



This project is poised to become a serious game-changer for Franklinton. While there was already ongoing redevelopment in this area, a mid-rise development like this pushes the envelope and raises the prospects of future development coming in bigger, and the pace of the redevelopment will likely accelerate. This also increases the likelihood that the Scioto Peninsula to the east will see larger scale development, as well. Originally, the city wanted a couple 30+ story buildings there, with a mix of other mid-rise buildings. That plan was abandoned when an Indianapolis developer was chosen for the site and proposed mostly low-rise. That developer was let go from the project a few months ago, and the Peninsula will now be developed piece by piece. With large development occurring in Franklinton itself, the high-rises may be about to make a return, making the entire eastern section of Franklinton an extension of Downtown.

So there are a few great projects that are definitely NOT missed opportunities. Take note, Downtown developers- a lot of you are getting embarrassed.

Columbus Area and Ohio City 2017 Population Estimates




So once again, city estimates came out today. As has been the case for a long time now, Columbus is rocketing upward at record pace. The 2016 comparison numbers have been adjusted by the Census for the 2017 update.

First, let’s take a look at the top 25 largest cities in Ohio on July 1, 2017.

Census 2010—————————-July 1, 2016——————-July 1, 2017
1. Columbus: 787,033——–1. Columbus: 863,741———–1. Columbus: 879,170
2. Cleveland: 396,815———2. Cleveland: 387,451———-2. Cleveland: 385,525
3. Cincinnati: 296,943———3. Cincinnati: 299,127———-3. Cincinnati: 301,301
4. Toledo: 287,208————-4. Toledo: 278,06—————4. Toledo: 276,491
5. Akron: 199,110————–5. Akron: 197,711—————5. Akron: 197,846
6. Dayton: 141,527————6. Dayton: 140,743————–6. Dayton: 140,371
7. Parma: 81,601————–7. Parma: 79,591—————–7. Parma: 79,167
8. Canton: 73,007————-8. Canton: 71,294—————-8. Canton: 70,909
9. Youngstown: 66,982——9. Youngstown: 64,360———9. Youngstown: 64,604
10. Lorain: 64,097————10. Lorain: 63,700—————-10. Lorain: 63,841
11. Hamilton: 62,477———11. Hamilton: 62,157————11. Hamilton: 62,092
12. Springfield: 60,608——-12. Springfield: 58,902———12. Springfield: 59,208
13. Kettering: 56,163———13. Kettering: 55,218————13. Kettering: 55,175
14. Elyria: 54,533————-14. Elyria: 53,880—————–14. Elyria: 53,883
15. Lakewood: 52,131——-15. Lakewood: 50,500———-15. Lakewood: 50,249
16. Cuyahoga Falls: 49,652–16. Cuyahoga Falls: 49,197–16. Newark: 49,423
17. Euclid: 48,920————-17. Newark: 48,899———-17. Cuyahoga Falls: 49,247
18. Middletown: 48,694——18. Middletown: 48,819——–18. Middletown: 48,823
19. Mansfield: 47,821——–19. Euclid: 47,464—————19. Dublin: 47,619
20. Newark: 47,573———–20. Mentor: 46,823————-20. Euclid: 47,201
21. Mentor: 47,159————21. Mansfield: 46,671———-21. Mentor: 47,121
22. Cleveland Heights: 46,121–22. Beavercreek: 46,393–22. Beavercreek: 46,948
23. Beavercreek: 45,193—–23. Dublin: 45,673————-23. Mansfield: 46,160
24. Strongsville: 44.750—–24. Cleveland Heights: 44,805–24. Strongsville: 44,744
25. Fairfield: 42,510———25. Strongsville: 44,713———25. Cleveland Heights: 44,562

So Columbus easily maintained #1, and Dublin and Newark are rapidly climbing the list.

Here are all of the Columbus Metro’s cities, towns and villages on July 1, 2017, and the total change from July 1, 2016.

1. Columbus: 879,170 +15,429
2. Newark: 49,423 +534
3. Dublin: 47,619 +1,937
4. Grove City: 41,022 +1,128
5. Lancaster: 40,280 +431
6. Westerville: 39,737 +671
7. Delaware: 39,267 +506
8. Reynoldsburg: 37,847 +345
9. Hilliard: 35,939 +938
10. Upper Arlington: 35,337 +217
11. Gahanna: 35,297 +241
12. Marysville: 23,912 +462
13. Pickerington: 20,402 +350
14. Whitehall: 18,913 +89
15. Pataskala: 15,566 +147
16. Worthington: 14,646 +71
17. Circleville: 13,930 +80
18. Bexley: 13,786 +48
19. Powell: 13,204 +400
20. New Albany: 10,718 +301
21. Heath: 10,713 +100
22. London: 10,138 +143
23. Canal Winchester: 8,294 +349
24. Grandview Heights: 7,778 +116
25. Logan: 7,069 +25
26. Granville: 5,773 +11
27. Groveport: 5,621 +26
28. Sunbury: 5,293 +57
29. Johnstown: 5,002 +43
30. Obetz: 4,967 +99
31. New Lexington: 4,704 -12
32. Plain City: 4,379 +32
33. West Jefferson: 4,355 +59
34. Ashville: 4,147 +29
35. Mount Gilead: 3,655 +1
36. Baltimore: 2,989 +15
37. Buckeye Lake: 2,816 +18
38. Crooksville: 2,491 -6
39. Hebron: 2,435 +23
40. Richwood: 2,372 +56
41. Utica: 2,211 +17
42. Cardington: 2,048 +2
43. South Bloomfield: 1,972 +19
44. Roseville: 1,839 -4
45. Mount Sterling: 1,767 +10
46. Commercial Point: 1,629 +13
47. Lithopolis: 1,573 +128
48. Ashley: 1,537 +26
49. Somerset: 1,462 -1
50. Bremen: 1,441 +6
51. Minerva Park: 1,321 +6
52. Hanover: 1,178 +15
53. Williamsport: 1,065 +6
54. Millersport: 1,055 +7
55. Urbancrest: 1,001 +6
56. Thornville: 999 +5
57. Pleasantville: 964 +3
58. Milford Center: 860 +20
59. New Holland: 840 +5
60. Junction City: 808 -2
61. Shawnee Hills: 787 +14
62. Amanda: 747 +4
63. Ostrander: 713 +13
64. New Straitsville: 711 -1
65. Marble Cliff: 683 +10
66. Galena: 682 +1
67. Shawnee: 643 -1
68. Valleyview: 638 +1
69. Thurston: 609 +4
70. Corning: 571 -1
71. Butchel: 568 +5
72. Stoutsville: 567 +3
73. Riverlea: 566 +2
74. Carroll: 560 +33
75. Kirkersville: 542 +3
76. Alexandria: 534 +3
77. Laurelville: 511 +2
78. Murray City: 441 +1
79. Edison: 438 +0
80. Sugar Grove: 426 +0
81. Hartford: 404 +2
82. St. Louisville: 380 +4
83. South Solon: 357 -1
84. Marengo: 338 -1
85. Harrisburg: 335 +4
86. Midway: 326 +1
87. Rushville: 310 +2
88. Magnetic Springs: 285 +8
89. Tarlton: 282 +1
90. Orient: 278 +1
91. Fulton: 258 +0
92. Lockbourne: 246 +0
93. Darbyville: 234 +1
94. Unionville Center: 232 -1
95. Chesterville: 227 +0
96. Gratiot: 222 +1
97. Glenford: 172 +0
98. Sparta: 158 -3
99. Hemlock: 152 +0
100. West Rushville: 135 +1
101. Brice: 119 +1
102. Rendville: 36 +0

Some milestones include Grove City and Lancaster passing 40,000 for the first time and Johnstown passing the 5,000 mark. 11 places lost population, 8 stayed the same and 83 gained population. The growing portions of the Columbus metro continue to encompass the vast majority of incorporated places.

Nationally, here were the top 20 fastest-growing cities by numerical change between July 1, 2016 and July 1, 2017

1. San Antonio, Texas: +24,208
2. Phoenix, Arizona: 24,036
3. Dallas, Texas: +18,935
4. Fort Worth, Texas: +18,664
5. Los Angeles: 18,643
6. Seattle, Washington: +17,490
7. Charlotte, North Carolina: +15,551
8. Columbus: +15,429
9. Frisco, Texas: +13,470
10. Atlanta, Georgia: +13,323
11. San Diego, California: +12,834
12. Austin, Texas: +12,515
13. Jacksonville, Florida: +11,169
14. Irvine, California: +11,068
15. Henderson, Nevada: +10,534
16. Las Vegas, Nevada: 9,966
17. Denver, Colorado: 9,844
18. Washington, DC: 9,636
19. Tampa, Florida: 9,383
20. Mesa, Arizona: 9,025

Columbus may in fact be an official boomtown now.




2017 County/Metro Population Estimates Part 2




In part 2, I am going to examine metro areas, not only in Ohio, but also Columbus’ peer group that includes Midwest and national metro areas. Midwest peers (outside Ohio) used would be any metro with a population greater than 500,000. National peers would be metros that either started or ended the period 2010-2017 with a population between 1.5-2.5 Million.

As with counties, I am going to start this look with a comparison of overall population.

Total Metro Area Population Census 2010, July 1, 2016 and July 1, 2017

Census 2010——————————-July 1, 2016————————July 1, 2017
1. Chicago, IL: 9,461,104————-1. Chicago: 9,546,326———–1. Chicago: 9,533,040
2. Detroit, MI: 4,296,250—————2. Detroit: 4,305,869————-2. Detroit: 9,313,002
3. Minneapolis, MN: 3,348,8459—3. Minneapolis: 3,557,276–3. Minneapolis: 3,600,618
4. St. Louis, MO: 2,787,701———4. St. Louis: 2,806,782———4. St. Louis: 2,807,338
5. Pittsburgh, PA: 2,356,285——–5. Charlotte: 2,475,519———5. Charlotte: 2,525,305
6. Portland, OR: 2,226,009———-6. Orlando: 2,453,333———-6. Orlando: 2,509,831
7. Charlotte: 2,217,012———–7. San Antonio: 2,426,211—–7. San Antonio: 2,473,974
8. Sacramento, CA: 2,149,127—–8. Portland: 2,423,102——–8. Portland: 2,453,168
9. San Antonio, TX: 2,142,516—–9. Pittsburgh: 2,341,536——9. Pittsburgh: 2,333,367
10. Orlando, FL: 2,134,411—–10. Sacramento: 2,295,233—10. Sacramento: 2,324,884
11. Cincinnati: 2,114,580———-11. Cincinnati: 2,166,029—–11. Las Vegas: 2,204,079
12. Cleveland: 2,077,240————12. Las Vegas: 2,156,724—-12. Cincinnati: 2,179,082
13. Kansas City, MO: 2,009,342-13. Kansas City: 2,106,382-13. Kansas City: 2,128,912
14. Las Vegas, NV: 1,951,269——–14. Austin: 2,060,558——–14. Austin: 2,115,827
15. Columbus: 1,901,974———-15. Cleveland: 2,060,065——15. Columbus: 2,078,725
16. Indianapolis, IN: 1,887,877——16. Columbus: 2,046,977—16. Cleveland: 2,058,844
17. San Jose, CA: 1,836,911—17. Indianapolis: 2,005,612—17. Indianapolis: 2,028,614
18. Austin, TX: 1,716,289————18. San Jose: 1,990,910—-18. San Jose: 1,998,463
19. Virginia Beach, VA: 1,676,822—19. Nashville: 1,868,855—-19. Nashville: 1,903,045
20. Nashville: 1,670,890—20. Virginia Beach: 1,722,766–20. Virginia Beach: 1,725,246
21. Providence, RI: 1,600,852—-21. Providence: 1,615,878—21. Providence: 1,621,122
22. Milwaukee, WI: 1,555,908—–22. Milwaukee: 1,576,143—22. Milwaukee: 1,576,236
23. Jacksonville, FL: 1,345,596-23. Jacksonville: 1,476,503–23. Jacksonville: 1,504,980
24. Grand Rapids: 988,938–24. Grand Rapids: 1,048,826-24. Grand Rapids: 1,059,113
25. Omaha, NE: 865,350————–25. Omaha: 924,003—-25. Omaha: 933,316
26. Dayton: 799,232——————–26. Dayton: 800,886—–26. Dayton: 803,416
27. Akron: 703,200———————27. Akron: 702,556——–27. Akron: 703,505
28. Wichita, KS: 630,919————-28. Madison: 647,432—28. Madison: 654,230
29. Toledo: 610,001——————29. Wichita: 644,680——29. Des Moines: 645,911
30. Madison, WI: 605,435———–30. Des Moines: 634,740—-30. Wichita: 645,628
31. Des Moines, IA: 569,633——-31. Toledo: 604,591——31. Toledo: 603,668
32. Youngstown: 565,773——32. Youngstown: 544,543—32. Youngstown: 541,926
33. Canton: 404,422——————33. Canton: 401,165—-33. Canton: 399,927

Columbus passed up Cleveland to become Ohio’s 2nd largest metro.

Metro Area Total Growth Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017—————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Austin, TX: +399,507———————————–1. Orlando: +56,498
2. Orlando, FL: +375,432———————————2. Austin: +55,269
3. San Antonio, TX: +331,458—————————3. Charlotte: +49,786
4. Charlotte, NC: +308,313——————————-4. San Antonio: +47,763
5. Las Vegas, NV: +252,810—————————–5. Las Vegas: +47,355
6. Minneapolis, MN: +251,760————————–6. Minneapolis: +43,342
7. Nashville, TN: +232,162——————————-7. Nashville: +34,190
8. Portland, OR: +227,167——————————-8. Columbus: +31,748
9. Columbus: +176,724———————————–9. Portland: +30,066
10. Sacramento, CA: +175,740————————10. Sacramento: +29,651
11. San Jose, CA: +161,523—————————-11. Jacksonville: +28,477
12. Jacksonville, FL: +159,382————————-12. Indianapolis: +23,002
13. Indianapolis, IN: +140,524————————-13. Kansas City: +22,530
14. Kansas City, MO: +119,574————————14. Cincinnati: +13,053
15. Des Moines, IA: +76,278—————————15. Des Moines: +11,171
16. Chicago, IL: +71,499——————————–16. Grand Rapids: +10,287
17. Grand Rapids, MI: +70,173————————17. Omaha: +9,313
18. Omaha, NE: +67,960——————————–18. San Jose: +7,533
19. Cincinnati: +64,396———————————–19. Detroit: +7,133
20. Madison, WI: +48,802——————————-20. Madison: +6,798
21. Virginia Beach, VA: +48,429———————-21. Providence: +5,244
22. Milwaukee, WI: +20,282—————————22. Dayton: +2,530
23. Providence, RI: +19,912————————–23. Virginia Beach: +2,480
24. St. Louis, MO: +19,575—————————24. Akron: +949
25. Detroit, MI: +16,685——————————-25. Wichita: +948
26. Wichita, KS: +14,704——————————26. St. Louis: +556
27. Dayton: +4,165————————————-27. Milwaukee: +93
28. Akron: +302—————————————–28. Toledo: -923
29. Canton: -4,501————————————-29. Cleveland: -1,221
30. Toledo: -6,334————————————-30. Canton: -1,238
31. Cleveland: -18,427——————————-31. Youngstown: -2,617
32. Pittsburgh, PA: -22,924————————-32. Pittsburgh: -8,169
33. Youngstown: -23,873—————————-33. Chicago: -13,286

Now, as done with counties, let’s look at the components of population change for metro areas.

Total Births By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Chicago: +869,178—————————————-1. Chicago: +115,915
2. Detroit: +364,121———————————————-2. Detroit: +49,940
3. Minneapolis: +331,430————————————–3. Minneapolis: +45,810
4. St. Louis: +246,280——————————————4. San Antonio: +34,318
5. San Antonio: +236,348————————————–5. St. Louis: +33,143
6. Charlotte: +217,525——————————————6. Charlotte: +31,315
7. Portland: +201,872——————————————-7. Orlando: +29,173
8. Orlando: +200,843——————————————-8. Portland: +28,220
9. Kansas City: +200,535————————————–9. Columbus: +27,663
10. Sacramento: +198,466————————————10. Kansas City: +27,565
11. Columbus: +197,185—————————————11. Las Vegas: +27,449
12. Cincinnati: +196,146—————————————12. Austin: +27,400
13. Las Vegas: +194,083————————————–13. Sacramento: +27,148
14. Indianapolis: +193,599————————————14. Cincinnati: +26,855
15. Austin: +188,961——————————————–15. Indianapolis: +26,769
16. San Jose: +176,224—————————————-16. Nashville: +24,690
17. Pittsburgh: +173,472—————————————17. San Jose: +23,826
18. Nashville: +170,824—————————————–18. Pittsburgh: +23,614
19. Cleveland: +168,361—————————————19. Cleveland: +22,873
20. Virginia Beach: +163,787———————————20. Milwaukee: +19,474
21. Milwaukee: +144,429————————————–21. Jacksonville: +18,748
22. Jacksonville: +130,339————————————22. Providence: +16,542
23. Providence: +120,526————————————-23. Grand Rapids: +13,548
24. Grand Rapids: +98,214———————————–24. Omaha: +13,421
25. Omaha: +96,558——————————————-25. Dayton: +9,615
26. Dayton: +69,855——————————————-26. Des Moines: +9,172
27. Wichita: +65,873——————————————27. Wichita: +8,694
28. Des Moines: +63,958————————————28. Madison: +7,400
29. Akron: +54,644——————————————–29. Toledo: +7,345
30. Toledo: +54,309——————————————-30. Akron: +7,342
31. Madison: +53,718—————————————-31. Virginia Beach: +5,935
32. Youngstown: +40,696———————————–32. Youngstown: +5,551
33. Canton: +32,199——————————————33. Canton: +4,434

Total Deaths By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Chicago: -501,469—————————————1. Chicago: -72,491
2. Detroit: -293,091—————————————–2. Detroit: -41,075
3. Pittsburgh: -197,572————————————3. Pittsburgh: -27,439
4. St. Louis: -186,111————————————–4. St. Louis: -26,755
5. Minneapolis: -161,913———————————5. Minneapolis: -23,527
6. Cleveland: -153,138———————————–6. Cleveland: -21,068
7. Cincinnati: -135,975———————————–7. Cincinnati: -19,515
8. Charlotte: -127,523————————————-8. Charlotte: -19,009
9. Portland: -120,590————————————–9. Orlando: -18,268
10. Sacramento: -120,429——————————10. Sacramento: -18,081
11. Kansas City: -119,748——————————11. Portland: -17,875
12. Orlando: -117,771———————————–12. San Antonio: -17,679
13. San Antonio: -117,289——————————13. Kansas City: -17,106
14. Indianapolis: -113,742——————————14. Las Vegas: -16,867
15. Columbus: -108,704——————————–15. Indianapolis: -16,081
16. Las Vegas: -108,003——————————–16. Columbus: -15,833
17. Providence: -107,920——————————-17. Providence: -15,031
18. Nashville: -99,415———————————–18. Nashville: -14,723
19. Virginia Beach: -97,935—————————-19. Milwaukee: -13,399
20. Milwaukee: -95,601———————————20. Jacksonville: -13,288
21. Jacksonville: -86,920——————————-21. San Jose: -11,360
22. San Jose: -73,507———————————–22. Austin: -10,609
23. Austin: -67,704—————————————23. Dayton: -8,359
24. Dayton: -59,736————————————-24. Grand Rapids: -7,674
25. Grand Rapids: -53,725—————————-25. Akron: -7,138
26. Akron: -50,948—————————————26. Youngstown: -6,821
27. Youngstown: -50,302——————————27. Omaha: -6,667
28. Omaha: -47,763————————————-28. Toledo: -5,968
29. Toledo: -42,313————————————-29. Wichita: -5,686
30. Wichita: -40,647————————————30. Des Moines: -4,631
31. Canton: -31,722————————————31. Canton: -4,366
32. Des Moines: -31,563——————————32. Madison: -4,252
33. Madison: -30,385———————————-33. Virginia Beach: -3,280

Total Net Natural Change (Births vs. Deaths) By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Chicago: +367,709—————————————1. Chicago: +43,424
2. Minneapolis: +169,517———————————–2. Minneapolis: +22,283
3. Austin: +121,257——————————————3. Austin: +16,791
4. San Antonio: +119,059———————————-4. San Antonio: +16,639
5. San Jose: +102,717————————————–5. San Jose: +12,466
6. Charlotte: +90,002—————————————-6. Charlotte: +12,306
7. Columbus: +88,481————————————–7. Columbus: +11,830
8. Las Vegas: +86,080————————————-8. Orlando: +10,905
9. Orlando: +83,072—————————————-9. Indianapolis: +10,688
10. Portland: +81,282————————————-10. Las Vegas: +10,582
11. Kansas City: +80,787———————————11. Kansas City: +10,459
12. Indianapolis: +79,857——————————–12. Portland: +10,345
13. Sacramento: +78,037——————————–13. Nashville: +9,967
14. Nashville: +71,409————————————14. Sacramento: +9,067
15. Detroit: +71,030—————————————15. Detroit: +8,865
16. Virginia Beach: +65,852—————————–16. Virginia Beach: +7,762
17. Cincinnati: +60,171———————————–17. Cincinnati: +7,340
18. St. Louis: +60,169————————————-18. Omaha: +6,754
19. Milwaukee: +48,828———————————-19. St. Louis: +6,388
20. Omaha: +48,795————————————–20. Grand Rapids: +5,874
21. Grand Rapids: +44,489—————————–21. Jacksonville: +5,460
22. Jacksonville: +43,419——————————-22. Des Moines: +4,541
23. Des Moines: +32,395——————————-23. Madison: +3,148
24. Wichita: +25,226————————————-24. Milwaukee: +6,075
25. Madison: +23,333———————————–25. Wichita: +3,008
26. Cleveland: +15,223——————————–26. Cleveland: +1,805
27. Providence: +12,606——————————27. Providence: +1,511
28. Toledo: +11,996———————————–28. Toledo: +1,377
29. Dayton: +10,119———————————-29. Dayton: +1,256
30. Akron: +3,696————————————–30. Akron: +204
31. Canton: +477—————————————31. Canton: +68
32. Youngstown: -9,606——————————-32. Youngstown: -1,270
33. Pittsburgh: -24,100——————————–33. Pittsburgh: -3,825

Total Domestic Migration By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Austin: +224,351—————————————–1. Charlotte: +31,102
2. Charlotte: +177,484————————————-2. Austin: +30,120
3. San Antonio: +169,684——————————–3. Las Vegas: +29,414
4. Orlando: +155,498————————————–4. San Antonio: +24,891
5. Nashville: +126,142————————————-5. Orlando: +23,321
6. Las Vegas: +119,742———————————-6. Jacksonville: +18,921
7. Portland: +106,839————————————-7. Nashville: +18,708
8. Jacksonville: +87,040———————————8. Portland: +13,384
9. Sacramento: +49,262———————————9. Sacramento: +12,888
10. Columbus: +42,932———————————10. Columbus: +12,562
11. Des Moines: +32,042——————————-11. Kansas City: +8,531
12. Indianapolis: +30,772——————————-12. Minneapolis: +8,095
13. Kansas City: +16,802——————————-13. Indianapolis: +7,763
14. Madison: +13,224————————————14. Des Moines: +4,812
15. Grand Rapids: +12,355—————————-15. Grand Rapids: +2,217
16. Omaha: +5,265—————————————16. Madison: +1,706
17. Minneapolis: +432———————————–17. Cincinnati: +1,541
18. Canton: -5,797—————————————-18. Omaha: +383
19. Akron: -13,427—————————————-19. Dayton: -346
20. Youngstown: -16,228——————————-20. Akron: -877
21. Dayton: -16,864————————————–21. Canton: -1,469
22. Wichita: -18,452————————————–22. Youngstown: -1,711
23. Cincinnati: -21,259———————————-23. Providence: -2,588
24. Toledo: -23,102————————————–24. Toledo: -3,070
25. Pittsburgh: -24,397———————————25. Wichita: -3,235
26. Providence: -33,335——————————-26. Virginia Beach: -4,706
27. Milwaukee: -50,575——————————–27. Cleveland: -8,008
28. Virginia Beach: -51,916—————————28. Pittsburgh: -8,633
29. Cleveland: -64,353——————————–29. Milwaukee: -9,635
30. St. Louis: -67,560———————————30. St. Louis: -8,828
31. San Jose: -73,026——————————–31. Detroit: -14,863
32. Detroit: -141,006———————————-32. San Jose: -25,729
33. Chicago: -479,482——————————–33. Chicago: -85,177

Total International Migration By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Chicago: +183,162—————————————1. Chicago: +28,302
2. Orlando: +135,860—————————————2. Orlando: +22,207
3. San Jose: +132,938————————————-3. San Jose: +20,747
4. Detroit: +86,366——————————————4. Detroit: +13,214
5. Minneapolis: +83,552———————————-5. Minneapolis: +13,107
6. Sacramento: +49,560———————————-6. Austin: +8,185
7. Austin: +49,311——————————————7. Sacramento: +7,722
8. Las Vegas: +46,411————————————8. Columbus: +7,350
9. Columbus: +45,744————————————9. Las Vegas: +7,221
10. Providence: +41,325——————————–10. Providence: +6,381
11. San Antonio: +40,953——————————-11. Portland: +6,335
12. Charlotte: +39,380———————————–12. Charlotte: +6,279
13. Portland: +38,542————————————13. San Antonio: +6,173
14. Virginia Beach: +34,619—————————-14. Nashville: +5,510
15. Nashville: +33,169———————————–15. Cleveland: +5,045
16. Cleveland: +31,236———————————-16. Indianapolis: +4,603
17. Indianapolis: +30,329——————————-17. Pittsburgh: +4,359
18. Jacksonville: +28,593——————————-18. Cincinnati: +4,285
19. St. Louis: +27,666————————————19. Jacksonville: +4,043
20. Pittsburgh: +27,300———————————20. St. Louis: +4,032
21. Cincinnati: +26,502———————————21. Milwaukee: +3,689
22. Kansas City: +23,098——————————22. Kansas City: +3,572
23. Milwaukee: +22,616——————————–23. Grand Rapids: +2,233
24. Omaha: +14,383————————————24. Omaha: +2,213
25. Grand Rapids: +13,800—————————25. Madison: +1,949
26. Madison: +12,367———————————-26. Des Moines: +1,807
27. Des Moines: +11,592—————————–27. Dayton: +1,654
28. Dayton: +11,230———————————–28. Akron: +1,647
29. Akron: +10,413————————————-29. Wichita: +1,187
30. Wichita: +8,117————————————-30. Virginia Beach: +1,077
31. Toledo: +4,627————————————-31. Toledo: +769
32. Youngstown: +2,171——————————32. Youngstown: +381
33. Canton: +1,118————————————33. Canton: +174

Total Net Migration By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Orlando: +291,358————————————–1. Orlando: +45,528
2. Austin: +273,662—————————————-2. Austin: +38,305
3. Charlotte: +216,864————————————3. Charlotte: +37,381
4. San Antonio: +210,637——————————–4. Las Vegas: +36,635
5. Las Vegas: +166,153———————————-5. San Antonio: +31,064
6. Nashville: +159,311————————————6. Nashville: +24,218
7. Portland: +145,381————————————7. Jacksonville: +22,964
8. Jacksonville: +115,633——————————-8. Minneapolis: +21,202
9. Sacramento: +98,822——————————–9. Sacramento: +20,610
10. Columbus: +88,676——————————–10. Columbus: +19,912
11. Minneapolis: +83,984——————————11. Portland: +19,719
12. Indianapolis: +61,101——————————12. Indianapolis: +12,366
13. San Jose: +59,912———————————-13. Kansas City: +12,103
14. Des Moines: +43,634——————————14. Des Moines: +6,619
15. Kansas City: +39,900——————————15. Cincinnati: +5,826
16. Grand Rapids: +26,155—————————16. Grand Rapids: +4,450
17. Madison: +25,591———————————-17. Providence: +3,793
18. Omaha: +19,648————————————18. Madison: +3,655
19. Providence: +7,990———————————19. Omaha: +2,596
20. Cincinnati: +5,243———————————-20. Dayton: +1,308
21. Pittsburgh: +2,903———————————-21. Akron: +770
22. Akron: -3,014—————————————-22. Canton: -1,295
23. Canton: -4,679————————————–23. Youngstown: -1,330
24. Dayton: -5,634————————————–24. Detroit: -1,649
25. Wichita: -10,335————————————25. Wichita: -2,048
26. Youngstown: -14,057—————————–26. Toledo: -2,301
27. Virginia Beach: -17,297————————–27. Cleveland: -2,963
28. Toledo: -18,475————————————28. Virginia Beach: -3,629
29. Milwaukee: -27,959——————————29. Pittsburgh: -4,274
30. Cleveland: -33,117——————————-30. San Jose: -4,982
31. St. Louis: -39,894———————————31. St. Louis: -5,796
32. Detroit: -54,640————————————32. Milwaukee: -5,946
33. Chicago: -296,320——————————-33. Chicago: -56,875




2017 Ohio County/Metro Population Estimates Part 1




Early this morning, the Census released the most recent population figures for counties, Metropolitan Statistical Areas and Consolidated Statistical Areas. The estimates cover the year from July 1, 2016 to July 1, 2017. For Part 1, we are going to take a look at counties.

Here are Ohio’s 88 counties and their population Census 2010, July 1, 2016 and July 1, 2017. The counties highlighted by color are as follows:
Akron Metro Counties
Canton  Metro Counties
Cincinnati Metro Counties (Ohio Only)
Cleveland Metro Counties
Columbus Metro Counties
Dayton Metro Counties
Toledo Metro Counties
Youngstown Metro Counties
Black are non-metro counties.

Census 2010——————————July 1, 2016————————-July 1, 2017
1. Cuyahoga: 1,280,122———–1. Franklin: 1,269,998———–1. Franklin: 1,291,981
2. Franklin: 1,163,414————2. Cuyahoga: 1,253,454——–2. Cuyahoga: 1,248,514
3. Hamilton: 802,374 ————–3. Hamilton: 810,087————-3. Hamilton: 813,822
4. Summit: 541,781—————-4. Summit: 540,394—————4. Summit: 541,228
5. Montgomery: 535,153——5. Montgomery: 531,395——–5. Montgomery: 530,604
6. Lucas: 441,815——————6. Lucas: 432,562—————–6. Lucas 430,887
7. Stark: 375,586——————-7. Butler: 377,933——————7. Butler: 380,604
8. Butler: 368,130——————8. Stark: 373,528——————8. Stark: 372,542
9. Lorain: 301,356—————–9. Lorain: 306,590——————9. Lorain: 307,924
10. Mahoning: 238,823———10. Mahoning: 230,169————10. Lake: 230,117
11. Lake: 230,041—————–11. Lake: 229,270——————11. Mahoning: 229,796
12. Warren: 212,693————-12. Warren: 226,476—————12. Warren: 228,882
13. Trumbull: 210,312———–13. Clermont: 203,016————13. Clermont: 204,214
14. Clermont: 197,363———–14. Trumbull: 201,701————-14. Delaware: 200,464
15. Delaware: 174,214———–15. Delaware: 196,777————15. Trumbull: 200,380
16. Medina: 172,332————-16. Medina: 176,903—————16. Medina: 178,371
17. Licking: 166,492————–17. Licking: 171,822—————17. Licking: 173,448
18. Greene: 161,573————–18. Greene: 165,109—————-18. Greene: 166,752
19. Portage: 161,419————-19. Portage: 162,162—————19. Portage: 162,277
20. Fairfield: 146,156————20. Fairfield: 152,681—————-20. Fairfield: 154,733
21. Clark: 138,333—————–21. Clark: 134,621——————–21. Clark: 134,557
22. Wood: 125,488—————22. Wood: 129,704——————-22. Wood: 130,492
23. Richland: 124,475————23. Richland: 121,167—————-23. Richland: 120,589
24. Wayne: 114,520————–24. Wayne: 116,422——————24. Wayne: 116,038
25. Columbiana: 107,841——-25. Miami: 104,382——————–25. Miami: 105,122
26. Allen: 106,331—————-26. Columbiana: 103,744————26. Allen: 103,198
27. Miami: 102,506————–27. Allen: 103,626——————27. Columbiana: 103,077
28. Ashtabula: 101,497———28. Ashtabula: 98,169————–28. Ashtabula: 97,807
29. Geauga: 93,389————-29. Geauga: 93,848—————–29. Geauga: 93,918
30. Tuscarawas: 92,582——–30. Tuscarawas: 92,485————30. Tuscarawas: 92,297
31. Muskingum: 86,074———31. Muskingum: 85,929————-31. Muskingum: 86,149
32. Scioto: 79,499—————-32. Ross: 76,910———————32. Ross: 77,313
33. Ross: 78,064—————–33. Scioto: 76,240——————–33. Scioto: 75,929
34. Erie: 77,079——————34. Hancock: 75,590—————–34. Hancock: 75,754
35. Hancock: 74,782————35. Erie: 74,944———————–35. Erie: 74,817
36. Belmont: 70,400————-36. Belmont: 68,568—————–36. Belmont: 68,029
37. Jefferson: 69,709————37. Jefferson: 66,914—————37. Athens: 66,597
38. Marion: 66,501—————38. Athens: 66,320——————38. Jefferson: 66,359
39. Athens: 64,757—————39. Marion: 65,334——————39. Marion: 64,967
40. Lawrence: 62,450———–40. Knox: 60,832———————40. Knox: 61,261
41. Washington: 61,778———41. Lawrence: 60,729————–41. Washington: 60,418
42. Sandusky: 60,944————42. Washington: 60,535———–42. Lawrence: 60,249
43. Knox: 60,921——————43. Sandusky: 59,281————–43. Sandusky: 59,195
44. Huron: 59,626—————–44. Huron: 58,391——————-44. Huron: 58,494
45. Seneca: 56,745—————45. Pickaway: 57,530—————45. Pickaway: 57,830
46. Pickaway: 55,698————-46. Union: 55,456——————-46. Union: 56,741
47. Ashland: 53,139—————47. Seneca: 55,357—————–47. Seneca: 55,243
48. Darke: 53,139—————–48. Ashland: 53,417—————–48. Ashland: 53,628
49. Union: 52,300——————49. Darke: 51,636——————-49. Darke: 51,536
50. Shelby: 49,423—————–50. Shelby: 48,726—————–50. Shelby: 48,759
51. Auglaize: 45,949————–51. Auglaize: 45,797—————-51. Auglaize: 45,778
52. Logan: 45,858—————–52. Logan: 45,171——————-52. Logan: 45,325
53. Brown: 44,846—————–53. Holmes: 43,832—————–53. Madison: 44,036
54. Crawford: 43,784————-54. Brown: 43,644——————-54. Holmes: 43,957
55. Highland: 43,589————-55. Madison: 43,354—————–55. Brown: 43,576
56. Madison: 43,435————-56. Highland: 42,993—————–56. Highland: 42,971
57. Fulton: 42,698—————-57. Fulton: 42,325——————–57. Fulton: 42,289
58. Holmes: 42,366————–58. Crawford: 42,037—————–58. Clinton: 42,009
59. Preble: 42,270—————-59. Clinton: 41,881——————-59. Crawford: 41,746
60. Clinton: 42,040—————60. Preble: 41,105——————–60. Preble: 41,120
61. Ottawa: 41,428—————61. Mercer: 40,710——————-61. Mercer: 40,873
62. Mercer: 40,814—————62. Ottawa: 40,495——————-62. Ottawa: 40,657
63. Champaign: 40,097———63. Guernsey: 39,200—————63. Guernsey: 39,093
64. Guernsey: 40,087———–64. Champaign: 38,737————-64. Champaign: 38,840
65. Defiance: 39,037————65. Defiance: 38,121—————–65. Defiance: 38,156
66. Williams: 37,642————66. Williams: 36,921——————66. Williams: 36,784
67. Coshocton: 36,901———-67. Coshocton: 36,644————-67. Coshocton: 36,544
68. Perry: 36,058—————–68. Perry: 36,019——————–68. Perry: 36,024
69. Morrow: 34,827————–69. Morrow: 34,827——————69. Morrow: 34,994
70. Putnam: 34,499————–70. Putnam: 34,016—————–70. Putnam: 33,878
71. Jackson: 33,225————-71. Jackson: 32,534—————–71. Jackson: 32,449
72. Hardin: 32,058—————72. Hardin: 31,407——————-72. Hardin: 31,364
73. Gallia: 30,934—————-73. Gallia: 29,996———————73. Gallia: 29,973
74. Hocking: 29,380————-74. Fayette: 28,662——————74. Fayette: 28,752
75. Fayette: 29,030————–75. Hocking: 28,386—————–75. Hocking: 28,474
76. Carroll: 28,836—————76. Pike: 28,237———————–76. Pike: 28,270
77. Van Wert: 28,744————77. Van Wert: 28,166—————-77. Van Wert: 28,217
78. Pike: 28,709——————-78. Adams: 27,832——————-78. Adams: 27,726
79. Adams: 28,550—————79. Carroll: 27,637——————–79. Carroll: 27,385
80. Henry: 28,215—————-80. Henry: 27,269———————80. Henry: 27,185
81. Meigs: 23,770—————-81. Meigs: 23,177———————81. Meigs: 23,080
82. Wyandot: 22,615————-82. Wyandot: 22,042—————-82. Wyandot: 22,029
83. Paulding: 19,614————83. Paulding: 18,839——————83. Paulding: 18,845
84. Harrison: 15,864————-84. Harrison: 15,257——————84. Harrison: 15,216
85. Morgan: 15,054————–85. Morgan: 14,762——————-85. Morgan: 14,709
86. Noble: 14,645—————–86. Noble: 14,443———————86. Noble: 14,406
87. Monroe: 14,642————–87. Monroe: 14,097——————–87. Monroe: 13,946
88. Vinton: 13,435—————-88. Vinton: 13,021———————88. Vinton: 13,092

Columbus’ counties tended to move up in the rankings 2010-2017.




Let’s now take a look at total growth for the periods July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017 and Census 2010 to July 1, 2017.

Census 2010-July 1, 2017————————-July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +128,452—————————–1. Franklin: +21,983
2. Delaware: +26,275—————————–2. Hamilton: +3,735
3. Warren: +16,049——————————–3. Delaware: +3,687
4. Butler: +12,474———————————-4. Butler: +2,671
5. Hamilton: +11,435——————————5. Warren: +2,406
6. Fairfield: +8,556——————————–6. Fairfield: +2,052
7. Licking: +6,956———————————7. Greene: +1,643
8. Clermont: +6,862——————————-8. Licking: +1,626
9. Lorain: +6,555———————————–9. Medina: +1,468
10. Medina: +6,038——————————-10. Lorain: +1,334
11. Greene: +5,178——————————-11. Union: +1,285
12. Wood: +5,003———————————12. Clermont: +1,198
13. Union: +4,482———————————13. Lake: +847
14. Miami: +2,621———————————14. Summit: +834
15. Pickaway: +2,152—————————–15. Wood: +788
16. Athens: +1,833——————————–16. Miami: +740
17. Holmes: +1,593——————————–17. Madison: +682
18. Wayne: +1,522———————————18. Knox: +429
19. Hancock: +965———————————19. Ross: +403
20. Portage: +856———————————-20. Pickaway: +300
21. Madison: +598———————————21. Athens: +277
22. Geauga: +508———————————-22. Muskingum: +220
23. Ashland: +489———————————23. Ashland: +211
24. Knox: +331————————————-24. Hancock: +164
25. Morrow: +167———————————25. Mercer: +163
26. Lake: +67————————————–26. Ottawa: +162
27. Muskingum: +63—————————–27. Logan: +154
28. Mercer: +59———————————-28. Montgomery: +147
29. Perry: -15————————————-29. Clinton: +128
30. Clinton: -28———————————–30. Holmes: +125
31. Auglaize: -171——————————-31. Portage: +115
32. Noble: -239———————————–32. Champaign: +103
33. Fayette: -273——————————–33. Huron: +103
34. Tuscarawas: -285————————–34. Fayette: +90
35. Vinton: -338———————————35. Hocking: +88
36. Morgan: -347——————————-36. Vinton: +71
37. Coshocton: -354—————————37. Geauga: +70
38. Fulton: -409———————————38. Van Wert: +51
39. Pike: -432———————————–39. Morrow: +40
40. Van Wert: -526—————————-40. Defiance: +35
41. Logan: -529———————————41. Pike: +33
42. Summit: -554——————————-42. Shelby: +33
43. Wyandot: -586——————————43. Preble: +15
44. Putnam: -618——————————-44. Paulding: +6
45. Highland: -629—————————–45. Perry: +5
46. Harrison: -646——————————46. Wyandot: -13
47. Shelby: -659——————————–47. Auglaize: -19
48. Meigs: -687———————————48. Highland: -22
49. Hardin: -696——————————–49. Gallia: -23
50. Monroe: -696——————————-50. Fulton: -36
51. Ross: -752———————————-51. Noble: -37
52. Paulding: -770——————————52. Harrison: -41
53. Jackson: -777——————————53. Hardin: -43
54. Ottawa: -777——————————-54. Morgan: -53
55. Adams: -826——————————-55. Clark: -64
56. Williams: -864—————————–56. Brown: -68
57. Defiance: -875—————————-57. Henry: -84
58. Hocking: -899—————————–58. Jackson: -85
59. Gallia: -973——————————–59. Sandusky: -86
60. Guernsey: -998————————–60. Meigs: -97
61. Henry: -1,030—————————–61. Coshocton: -100
62. Huron: -1,131—————————–62. Darke: -100
63. Preble: -1,139—————————-63. Adams: -106
64. Champaign: -1,253———————64. Guernsey: -107
65. Brown: -1,267—————————-65. Seneca: -114
66. Washington: -1,360———————66. Washington: -117
67. Darke: -1,433—————————-67. Erie: -127
68. Carroll: -1,451—————————68. Williams: -137
69. Seneca: -1,499————————-69. Putnam: -138
70. Marion: -1,534————————–70. Monroe: -151
71. Sandusky: -1,751———————-71. Tuscarawas: -188
72. Crawford: -2,039———————–72. Carroll: -252
73. Lawrence: -2,199———————-73. Crawford: -291
74. Erie: -2,249—————————–74. Scioto: -311
75. Belmont: -2,373————————75. Ashtabula: -362
76. Stark: -3,050—————————-76. Marion: -367
77. Allen: -3,128—————————-77. Mahoning: -373
78. Jefferson: -3,350———————-78. Wayne: -384
79. Scioto: -3,568————————–79. Allen: -428
80. Montgomery: -3,634——————80. Lawrence: -480
81. Ashtabula: -3,681———————81. Belmont: -539
82. Clark: -3,790—————————82. Jefferson: -555
83. Richland: -3,887———————-83. Richland: -578
84. Columbiana: -4,764——————84. Columbiana: -667
85. Mahoning: -9,011———————85. Stark: -986
86. Trumbull: -9,938———————-86. Trumbull: -1,321
87. Lucas: -10,928————————87. Lucas: -1,675
88. Cuyahoga: -31,595——————88. Cuyahoga: -4,940

Finally, let’s examine the components of population change, but top 15 only.

Top 15 Counties with the Most Births Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +134,9580———————————–1. Franklin: +19,039
2. Cuyahoga: +107,949———————————-2. Cuyahoga: +14,637
3. Hamilton: +79,087————————————-3. Hamilton: +10,787
4. Montgomery: +48,275——————————–4. Montgomery: +6,576
5. Summit: +44,151—————————————5. Summit: +5,945
6. Lucas: +40,874—————————————–6. Lucas: +5,494
7. Butler: +32,888—————————————–7. Butler: +4,531
8. Stark: +30,188——————————————8. Stark: +4,163
9. Lorain: +24,497—————————————-9. Lorain: +3,329
10. Warren: +17,492————————————-10. Mahoning: +2,382
11. Mahoning: +17,312———————————11. Warren: +2,376
12. Clermont: +16,980———————————-12. Clermont: +2,307
13. Lake: +16,465—————————————–13. Lake: +2,244
14. Delaware: +15,662———————————-14. Delaware: +2,146
15. Trumbull: +15,153———————————–15. Trumbull: +2,059

Top 15 Counties with the Fewest Births Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Noble: +1,020——————————————-1. Noble: +131
2. Morgan: +1,050—————————————–2. Monroe: +135
3. Vinton: +1,051——————————————-3. Morgan: +139
4. Monroe: +1,083—————————————–4. Vinton: +144
5. Harrison: +1,150—————————————-5. Harrison: +149
6. Paulding: +1,595—————————————-6. Paulding: +213
7. Meigs: +1,762——————————————-7. Meigs: +228
8. Wyandot: +1,849—————————————8. Wyandot: +240
9. Carroll: +2,011—————————————–9. Carroll: +271
10. Hocking: +2,282————————————-10. Henry: +291
11. Henry: +2,295—————————————–11. Hocking: +309
12. Van Wert: +2,373————————————-12. Adams: +322
13. Adams: +2,431—————————————-13. Pike: +328
14. Ottawa: +2,489—————————————-14. Van Wert: +328
15. Pike: +2,504——————————————–15. Ottawa: +334

Top 15 Counties with the Most Deaths Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Cuyahoga: -98,692———————————–1. Cuyahoga: -13,439
2. Franklin: -65,458————————————–2. Franklin: -9,542
3. Hamilton: -56,157————————————-3. Hamilton: -7,768
4. Montgomery: -42,353——————————-4. Montgomery: -5,883
5. Summit: -40,895————————————–5. Summit: -5,735
6. Lucas: -31,778—————————————-6. Lucas: -4,465
7. Stark: -29.531—————————————–7. Stark: -4,077
8. Butler: -22,747—————————————-8. Butler: -3,347
9. Mahoning: -22,021———————————–9. Lorain: -2,947
10. Lorain: -21,265————————————-10. Mahoning: -2,920
11. Trumbull: -18,189———————————-11. Trumbull: -2,459
12. Lake: -17,265—————————————-12. Lake: -2,444
13. Clark: -12,267—————————————-13. Warren: -1,785
14. Clermont: -11,924———————————-14. Clermont: -1,706
15. Warren: -11,411————————————-15. Clark: -1,680

Top 15 Counties with the Fewest Deaths Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Noble: -916————————————————1. Noble: -131
2. Vinton: -1,025———————————————2. Vinton: -147
3. Morgan: -1,215——————————————-3. Morgan: -152
4. Monroe: -1,260——————————————-4. Harrison: -186
5. Paulding: -1,405—————————————–5. Paulding: -186
6. Harrison: -1,449——————————————6. Monroe: -189
7. Wyandot: -1,756—————————————–7. Wyandot: -246
8. Meigs: -2,004———————————————8. Henry: -249
9. Henry: -2,007———————————————9. Carroll: -289
10. Hocking: -2,131—————————————10. Meigs: -290
11. Putnam: -2,153—————————————–11. Hocking: -294
12. Carroll: -2,191—————————————–12. Putnam: -303
13. Holmes: -2,191—————————————–13. Van Wert: -306
14. Van Wert: -2,275—————————————14. Morrow: -308
15. Hardin: -2,284——————————————-15. Fayette: -318

Top 15 Counties with the Highest Natural Increase (Births vs. Deaths) Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +69,500————————————-1. Franklin: +9,497
2. Hamilton: +22,930————————————2. Hamilton: +3,019
3. Butler: +10,141—————————————-3. Cuyahoga: +1,198
4. Cuyahoga: +9,257————————————4. Butler: +1,184
5. Lucas: +9,096——————————————5. Lucas: +1,029
6. Delaware: +8,339————————————-6. Delaware: +1,013
7. Warren: +6,081—————————————-7. Montgomery: +693
8. Montgomery: +5,922——————————–8. Clermont: +601
9. Clermont: +5,056————————————-9. Warren: +591
10. Holmes: +3,410————————————–10. Holmes: +445
11. Fairfield: +3,380————————————-11. Guernsey: +414
12. Wayne: +3,313—————————————12. Licking: +408
13. Summit: +3,256————————————-13. Wayne: +406
14. Lorain: +3,232—————————————14. Lorain: +382
15. Licking: +3,173————————————–15. Fairfield: +378

Top 15 Counties with the Lowest Natural Increase (Births vs. Deaths) Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Mahoning: -4,709—————————————1. Mahoning: -538
2. Trumbull: -3,036—————————————-2. Trumbull: -400
3. Jefferson: -2,097—————————————–3. Jefferson: -276
4. Belmont: -1,370——————————————4. Lake: -200
5. Erie: -990————————————————–5. Belmont: -197
6. Ottawa: -977———————————————-6. Ottawa: -171
7. Columbiana: -891—————————————7. Washington: -134
8. Washington: -829—————————————8. Erie: -132
9. Lake: -800———————————————–9. Columbiana: -130
10. Clark: -694———————————————10. Clark: -119
11. Scioto: -493——————————————–11. Scioto: -68
12. Crawford: -363—————————————-12.  Lawrence: -67
13. Ashtabula: -354—————————————13. Meigs: -62
14. Harrison: -299—————————————–14. Monroe: -54
15. Lawrence: -285—————————————15. Harrison: -37

Top 15 Counties with the Most Domestic Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +18,270———————————-1. Franklin: +5,861
2. Delaware: +15,671———————————2. Delaware: +2,346
3. Warren: +6,996————————————-3. Fairfield: +1,491
4. Fairfield: +4,106————————————4. Warren: +1,332
5. Licking: +3,332————————————-5. Licking: +1,137
6. Medina: +2,900————————————-6. Medina: +1,058
7. Union: +1,953—————————————7. Union: +871
8. Pickaway: +1,489———————————-8. Greene: +763
9. Wood: +1,447—————————————9. Lake: +748
10. Clermont: +1,372——————————–10. Butler: +668
11. Miami: +1,293————————————-11. Madison: +639
12. Ottawa: +224————————————–12. Miami: +547
13. Madison: +177————————————13. Clermont: +515
14. Morgan: -186————————————–14. Ross: +379
15. Lorain: -271—————————————-15. Ottawa: +337

Top 15 Counties with the Least Domestic Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Cuyahoga: -65,672————————————-1. Cuyahoga: -10,087
2. Hamilton: -25,292—————————————2. Lucas: -3,249
3. Lucas: -23,401——————————————-3. Montgomery: -1,656
4. Montgomery: -16,752———————————-4. Hamilton: -1,533
5. Summit: -10,630—————————————–5. Stark: -1,232
6. Trumbull: -6,852—————————————–6. Trumbull: -923
7. Mahoning: -6,113—————————————7. Wayne: -897
8. Allen: -4,673———————————————–8. Allen: -618
9. Stark: -4,510———————————————-9. Richland: -613
10. Richland: -4,240—————————————-10. Columbiana: -528
11. Columbiana: -3,802————————————11. Portage: -425
12. Ashtabula: -3,779—————————————12. Ashtabula: -412
13. Scioto: -3,267——————————————–13. Lawrence: -392
14. Clark: -3,198———————————————14. Marion: -389
15. Portage: -2,797—————————————–15. Tuscarawas: -382

Top 15 Counties with the Most International Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +40,914—————————————1. Franklin: +6,584
2. Cuyahoga: +24,799————————————2. Cuyahoga: +3,961
3. Hamilton: +14,063————————————–3. Hamilton: +2,288
4. Montgomery: +7,418————————————4. Montgomery: +1,131
5. Summit: +7,132——————————————5. Summit: +1,101
6. Butler: +5,226——————————————–6. Butler: +839
7. Lorain: +3,810——————————————–7. Lorain: +641
8. Greene: +3,443——————————————8. Portage: +546
9. Portage: +3,281—————————————–9. Lucas: +539
10. Lucas: +3,247——————————————10. Warren: +499
11. Warren: +3,140—————————————-11. Greene: +473
12. Delaware: +2,178————————————-12. Delaware: +336
13. Athens: +2,081—————————————–13. Athens: +326
14. Mahoning: +1,917————————————-14. Mahoning: +326
15. Lake: +1,740——————————————–15. Lake: +314

Top 15 Counties with the Least International Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Lawrence: -168——————————————1. Lawrence: -19
2. Belmont: -113——————————————–2. Belmont: -18
3. Jefferson: -108——————————————-3. Jefferson: -16
4. Columbiana: -44—————————————–4. Columbiana: -7
5. Williams: -40———————————————-5. Williams: -6
6. Brown: -39————————————————6. Brown: -4
7. Holmes: -16———————————————–7. Holmes: -3
8. Monroe: -5————————————————8. Monroe: -1
9. Vinton: -2————————————————–9. Van Wert: -1
10. Meigs: 0————————————————10. Harrison: 0
11. Trumbull: +2——————————————-11. Ottawa: 0
12. Harrison: +4——————————————-12. Vinton: 0
13. Adams: +7———————————————13. Meigs: +1
14. Van Wert: +10—————————————-14. Noble: +1
15. Noble: +10——————————————–15. Pike: +1
16. Morgan: +10

Top 15 Counties with the Most Net Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +59,184—————————————1. Franklin: +12,445
2. Delaware: +17,849————————————–2. Delaware: +2,682
3. Warren: +10,136—————————————-3. Warren: +1,831
4. Fairfield: +5,274—————————————–4. Fairfield: +1,686
5. Licking: +3,928——————————————5. Butler: +1,507
6. Lorain: +3,539——————————————–6. Greene: +1,236
7. Medina: +3,492——————————————-7. Licking: +1,225
8. Wood: +2,720———————————————8. Medina: +1,142
9. Butler: +2,527——————————————–9. Lake: +1,062
10. Union: +2,415—————————————–10. Lorain: +969
11. Greene: +2,038—————————————-11. Union: +952
12. Clermont: +1,975————————————-12. Hamilton: +755
13. Miami: +1,662——————————————-13. Madison: +679
14. Pickaway: +1,556————————————-14. Summit: +649
15. Athens: +1,285——————————————15. Clermont +609

Top 15 Counties with the Least Net Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Cuyahoga: -40,873————————————1. Cuyahoga: -6,126
2. Lucas: -20,154——————————————2. Lucas: -2,710
3. Hamilton: -11,229————————————–3. Stark: -1,061
4. Montgomery: -9,334———————————–4. Trumbull: -918
5. Trumbull: -6,850—————————————-5. Wayne: -794
6. Allen: -4,504———————————————6. Allen: -596
7. Mahoning: -4,196————————————–7. Richland: -587
8. Richland: -4,087—————————————-8. Columbiana: -535
9. Columbiana: -3,846————————————9. Montgomery: -525
10. Summit: -3,496—————————————-10. Lawrence: -411
11. Stark: -3,408——————————————-11. Marion: -379
12. Ashtabula: -3,327————————————-12. Belmont: -341
13. Scioto: -3,064——————————————13. Ashtabula: -336
14. Clark: -3,032——————————————–14. Tuscarawas: -326
15. Huron: -2,359——————————————-15. Holmes: -319

So there you have it for counties.  Part 2 on Metro and CSAs will be coming soon!