Columbus Area Housing Market- September

September continued one of the Columbus area’s longest positive streaks when it came to housing sales, although sales were down a bit from earlier this year. Overall, sales were up 13.1% and prices were up 4.2%.

For the housing report, I look at the 21 major areas of the Franklin County area (11 urban, 10 suburban). Here is what the September market looked like.

Top 10 September Sales Totals
1. Columbus: 820
2. Dublin: 72
3. Westerville: 59
4. Upper Arlington: 53
5. Grove City: 49
6. Hilliard: 49
7. Clintonville: 47
8. Gahanna: 45
9. Reynoldsburg: 34
10. Canal Winchester: 29

Top 10 September Sales Increases Over September 2012
1. Whitehall: +142.9%
2. Westerville: +96.7%
3. Obetz: +66.7%
4. Canal Winchester: +38.1%
5. Reynoldsburg: +36.0%
6. Pataskala: +35.7%
7. Grove City: +32.4%
8. Gahanna: +28.6%
9. New Albany: +28.6%
10. Minerva Park: +25.0%

Top 10 Total YTD Sales Through September
1. Columbus: 8,019
2. Dublin: 636
3. Upper Arlington: 588
4. Clintonville: 554
5. Westerville: 495
6. Grove City: 487
7. Hilliard: 460
8. Gahanna: 414
9. Reynoldsburg: 381
10. Pickerington: 254

Top 10 YTD Sales Increases Through over September 2012
1. Minerva Park: +47.6%
2. Whitehall: +45.9%
3. Hilliard: +36.1%
4. Pataskala: +33.1%
5. Westerville: +33.1%
6. Bexley: +32.4%
7. Gahanna: +31.8%
8. Reynoldsburg: +31.8%
9. Clintonville: +28.5%
10. German Village: +27.6%

Average Sales September 2013
Urban: 91.6
Suburban: 39.2
Urban without Columbus: 18.8

Average % Change September 2013 vs. September 2012
Urban: +10.6%
Suburban: +30.3%
Urban without Columbus: +10.5%

Average Sales YTD Through September
Urban: 923.2
Suburban: 370.1
Urban without Columbus: 213.6

Average % Change YTD vs. YTD 2012 (Through September)
Urban: +19.2
Suburban: +24.7%
Urban without Columbus: +18.5%

Top 10 Average Sales Price September 2013
1. New Albany: $512,564
2. Upper Arlington: $402,771
3. Dublin: $359,925
4. Bexley: $293,331
5. Downtown: $259,331
6. Grandview Heights: $244,433
7. German Village: $235,557
8. Worthington: $234,716
9. Hilliard: $220,823
10. Clintonville: $206,610

Top 10 Average Sales Price % Increases vs. September 2012
1. Whitehall: +99.3%
2. Obetz: +98.1%
3. Minerva Park: +51.3%
4. Upper Arlington: +20.6%
5. New Albany: +20.2%
6. Gahanna: +18.5%
7. Dublin: +13.5%
8. Hilliard: +10.5%
9. Pickerington: +10.2%
10. Reynoldsburg: +9.4%

Top 10 Average Sales Price YTD
1. New Albany: $543,445
2. Upper Arlington: $364,187
3. Bexley: $347,444
4. Dublin: $333,741
5. German Village: $302,753
6. Downtown: $281,729
7. Worthington: $246,663
8. Grandview Heights: $222,115
9. Hilliard: $219,302
10. Gahanna: $201,444

Top 10 Average YTD Sales Price % Change vs. YTD 2012
1. Whitehall: +23.2%
2. Minerva Park: +18.2%
3. Downtown: +13.5%
4. Upper Arlington: +13.3%
5. Gahanna: +12.9%
6. Reynoldsburg: +9.6%
7. New Albany: +9.4%
8. Canal Winchester: +6.6%
9. Bexley: +6.0%
10. Worthington: +5.7%

Average Price September 2013
Urban: $210,653
Suburban: $222,473
Urban without Columbus: $219,161

Average Price % Change vs. September 2012
Urban: +23.7%
Suburban: +7.7%
Urban without Columbus: +25.9%

Average Price YTD
Urban: $215,336
Suburban: $223,809
Urban without Columbus: $224,046

Average Price % Change YTD vs. YTD 2012
Urban: +6.2%
Suburban: +5.2%
Urban without Columbus: +6.4%

Top 10 Fastest Selling Markets September (based on # of Days listings sell)
1. Worthington: 26
2. Minerva Park: 29
3. Clintonville: 34
4. Obetz: 34
5. Upper Arlington: 34
6. Hilliard: 41
7. Westerville: 42
8. New Albany: 44
9. Pickerington: 45
10. Whitehall: 45

Top 10 Fastest Selling Markets YTD
1. Worthington: 37
2. Upper Arlington: 45
3. Grandview Heights: 48
4. Clintonville: 52
5. Hilliard: 53
6. Westerville: 53
7. Bexley: 58
8. Gahanna: 58
9. Dublin: 61
10. Grove City: 61

Average # of Days before Sale, September 2013
Urban: 48.0
Suburban: 51.8
Urban without Columbus: 47.1

Average # of Days before Sale, YTD
Urban: 60.7
Suburban: 61.1
Urban without Columbus: 60.3

Top 10 Lowest Housing Supplies (based on # of months to sell all listings), September 2013
1. Worthington: 1.9
2. Upper Arlington: 2.3
3. Bexley: 2.4
4. Hilliard: 2.6
5. Westerville: 2.6
6. Clintonville: 2.7
7. Grandview Heights: 2.9
8. Gahanna: 3.2
9. Dublin: 3.4
10. Whitehall: 3.7

Average # of Months to Sell All Listings
Urban: 3.5
Suburban: 4.1
Urban without Columbus: 3.4

Average % Change of Single-Family Home Sales, September 2013 vs. September 2012
Urban: +23.7%
Suburban: +31.0%
Urban without Columbus: +24.7%

Average % Change of Condo Sales, September 2013 vs. September 2012
Urban: -23.5%
Suburban: +48.4%
Urban without Columbus: -25.3%

Average % Change of Single-Family Home Sales YTD vs. YTD 2012
Urban: +13.0%
Suburban: +24.7%
Urban without Columbus: +11.7%

Average % Change of Condo Sales YTD vs. YTD 2012
Urban: +35.8%
Suburban: +26.2%
Urban without Columbus: +36.7%

Odd Columbus Events #1

On the hot, summer day of August 21, 1947, a thunderstorm hit the Columbus area that would produce a memorable and tragic event. A bolt of lightning struck the southwestern corner of the Broad Street Bridge in Downtown. Perhaps because of the extreme heat or structural deficiencies, the lightning caused part of the bridge to seemingly explode, and large chunks of the bridge collapsed into the Scioto River. While no cars fell off the bridge as a result, 4 pedestrians did. One of those pedestrians died the following day from sustained injuries. The bridge itself had been built as the replacement for the one destroyed during the great flood of 1913. After the incident in 1947, the bridge was repaired and continued to serve as the main Scioto River crossing at Downtown for another 43 years. In 1990, it was demolished and replaced by the current (and very similar looking) Discovery Bridge, completed in 1992 in time for the celebration of the 500th anniversary of the “discovery” of America by the city’s namesake, Christopher Columbus.

Columbus’ Walkability and More

“Walkability” is the new buzzword when it comes to urban neighborhoods and what new generations want. Based on the Walkscore.com criteria, and with scores from 0-100 (100 being the most walkable), here are Columbus’ most walkable neighborhoods.

Top 25 Most Walkable Neighborhoods and Total Score
1. Downtown: 86
2. Dennison Place (Short North): 85
3. Italian Village (Short North): 85
4. Weinland Park (Just northeast of Short North): 85
5. Indiana Forest (Northeast Campus Area): 84
6. Necko (South Campus): 81
7. Victorian Village (Short North): 81
8. Old North Columbus: 80
9. Glen Echo (North Columbus): 80
10. North Campus: 80
11. German Village: 79
12. Tri-Village (5th Avenue West): 79
13. Brewery District: 78
14. OSU: 77
15. Iuka Ravine (North Columbus): 76
16. Clintonville: 75
17: King-Lincoln (Near East Side): 74
18. Schumacher Place (Near South Side): 73
19. Busch (Northwest Columbus): 72
20. Indianola Terrace (North Columbus): 71
21. Merion Village: 69
22. Governours Square (Bethel and Henderson): 68
23: Harrison West (Hilltop): 67
24. Old Beechwold (North Columbus): 67
25. Olde Towne East: 67

Together, the top 25 neighborhoods contain a little over 100,000 people.

Overall Columbus Neighborhood Walkability Score Breakdown
90-100 (Walker’s Paradise-daily errands do not require a car): 0
70-89 (Very Walkable- most errands can be done on foot): 20
50-69 (Somewhat Walkable- some errands cand be done on foot): 72
0-49 (Car Dependent- most or all errands require a car): 120

Average Columbus Score: 47

So less than half of Columbus’ neighborhoods are walkable, and only a small amount are very walkable where most tasks do not require a car. The overall score shows that Columbus is still largely a car-dependent city.

Walkability, however, is just part of the picture. There are also scores for biking and mass transit access, both of which are also measured on the 0-100 scale.

Top 25 Bikeable Neighborhoods
1. North Campus: 89
2. Harrison West: 88
3. Northmoor (North Columbus): 80
4. Old North Columbus: 80
5. Clintonville: 77
6. OSU: 75
7. Brewery District: 74
8. Dennison Place: 74
9. Glen Echo: 74
10. Victorian Village: 74
11. Indiana Forest: 72
12. Iuka Ravine: 72
13. Necko: 71
14. Italian Village: 70
15. Merion Village: 68
16. Tri-Village: 68
17. Weinland Park: 67
18. Downtown: 66
19. Indianola Terrace (North Columbus): 66
20. North Hilltop: 66
21. Whetstone: 66
22. German Village: 64
23. Mount Vernon (Near East Side): 64
24. Riverview (North Columbus): 63
25. Schumacher Place: 63

The majority of Columbus’ most bikeable neighborhoods are also the most walkable.

Bikeable Neighborhood Score Breakdown
90-100: 0
70-89: 14
50-69: 45
0-49: 153

Average Columbus Bikeable Score: 45

Similar to its walkability, the majority of Columbus’ neighborhoods are not particularly bikeable. This has a lot to do with the further out and newer suburban areas of the city being built almost exclusively for cars. Only in the last 10 years has the city become more interested in promoting bike use. The city is adding several hundred miles of bike lanes and bike infrastructure, and it recently launched its own bike-share system.

Finally, we have the transit scores, which are based on access to mass transit options.

Top 25 Most Transit-Friendly Neighborhoods
1. Downtown: 64
2. Brewery District: 57
3. Italian Village: 57
4. German Village: 55
5. Victorian Village: 55
6. Dennison Place: 54
7. Weinland Park: 54
8. Necko: 52
9. Olde Towne East: 52
10. Schumacher Place: 52
11. Indiana Forest: 50
12. Harrison West: 49
13. King-Lincoln: 49
14. North Campus: 49
15. OSU: 49
16. Franklin Park (Near East Side): 49
17. Beechwood: 47
18. Iuka Ravine: 47
19. Milo-Grogan: 47
20. South of Main (Near East Side): 47
21. Livingston Park North (Near South Side): 46
22. Mount Vernon: 46
23. Old North Columbus: 46
24. Woodland Park (Near East Side): 46
25. Franklinton: 45

Transit Score Neighborhood Breakdown
90-100: 0
70-89: 0
50-69: 11
0-49: 201

Average Columbus Transit Score: 29

Clearly, based on these numbers, the city’s transit system needs a ton of improvement. COTA, or the city’s bus system, is really the only form of mass transit available, and beyond a few areas near Downtown, seems to struggle to provide access. The city is currently studying BRT (Bus Rapid Transit) with a first line proposed from Downtown and up along Cleveland Avenue to the North Side, with future lines coming after that. This will help, but there is still much to be done. Some type of rail system should also be part of near future development, as the city remains one of the largest in the US without any type of passenger rail.

So what is the overall picture of the city? First, that too much of the city is built for car use only. The boom in urban development has been significant, but the vast majority of it is occurring in areas that have the highest scores. Correlation or coincidence? Densification of neighborhoods further from the core is entirely possible, and these areas can and should be built with walkability and transit in mind. The city is taking steps for improvement, but it is, at least in my opinion, one of the weakest points of Columbus.

To see where your neighborhood stands, check out http://www.walkscore.com/