Before and After: March 2013 Edition

Before

Photo taken looking north along South Central Avenue in Franklinton during the flood of January 21-24, 1959.


After

Present day South Central Avenue in Franklinton.

The 1959 flood was the 2nd worst in the history of Franklinton, after the 1913 disaster. The Frank Road crest on the Scioto River came on January 22, 1959 and was 27.22 ft, 3.22 ft above flood stage and a few feet below the 1913 crest. This crest would not cause serious flooding in Franklinton today, as the Franklinton Floodwall, completed in 2004, will protect the area to crests of up to 30.9 ft. Few people know that, prior to the wall’s completion, federal guidelines prohibited almost all types of construction in Franklinton, a huge reason for the gradual decline it faced after the 1950s.

Before

Avondale Elementary at 157 Avondale Avenue in 1908.

After

Avondale Elementary, present day. The school was built in 1892.

Avondale Elementary has been a school for its entire 121 year existance. Besides losing it’s rootop finials, the school is largely unchanged and is a beautiful example of late 19th century architecture.

Before

Bellows Avenue school in 1922.

After

The 1905 school in the present day.

Bellows Elementary was opened in 1905 and was used for that purpose through the 1970s. The building was last renovated in 1972, but was closed as a school between that year and 1984, when Columbus Public Schools sold the property. It has changed hands a few times over the years, the last being in 2002, but nothing has come of it and the building deteriorates a bit more each year. Unfortunately, the location of the school probably proved to be its death, as the interchange of 315 and 70/71 was constructed just to the south, and 315 itself cut off Bellows Avenue. The school narrowly escaped the wrecking ball at that time, but without some type of redevelopment, the property may eventually be lost anyway.

Before

The Columbus Heating and Ventilation Company at 433 W. Town Street on March 25, 1913, during the infamous flood.

The same building 3 years later in 1916, looking a bit spruced up as well as the newer roads that were no doubt damaged in 1913.

After

And 433 W. Town Street as it looked in 2010. The building was torn down the following year.

The Columbus Heating and Ventilating Company began in 1903 and still exists in the city, although obviously not at its original location. The old building went into severe disrepair and most of the roof had collapsed by the time it was demolished in 2011 as one of the first steps in the area’s rebirth. The area is going through revitalization, and the nearby 400 W. Rich artist live and work space continues to expand. Plans are also in the works for new loft apartments nearby.



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Updates and Coming Attractions

I updated some information on the Columbus Demographics page, the Development page and the Post-1950 census tract page.

Coming Soon
Neighborhood Profile- A new post series, the first being Olde Towne East
Before and After- A new page dedicated to showing historical photos from around the Columbus area and their present-day counterparts.
More individual project updates. I’ve done a LOT of data posts in recent months and have neglected mentioning any of the recent projects that have made news recently, so I’ll be highlighting some of those.

Metro Density Comparison Part 2

For tracts, I looked over the maps of all cities within metros that had populations between 1.5 and 2.5 million (based on 2010 census). I then found every tract that had a population density of 5,000 people per square mile or higher, but I tried to stay within the core city and its immediate surroundings. In most cases, this was just within the central metro county, but some cities are split between county borders and even state borders, so I tried to use an equal approximation.

First, the total number of tracts with 5,000+ densities by city and rank.

1. Las Vegas: 290
2. San Jose: 285
3. Cleveland: 211
4. Milwaukee: 198
5. Portland: 174
6. Sacramento: 168
7. Pittsburgh: 147
8. San Antonio: 118
9. Columbus: 98
10. Virginia Beach: 92
11. Cincinnati: 84
12. Providence: 84
13. Austin: 61
14. Orlando: 47
15. Indianapolis: 46
16. Kansas City: 44
17. Nashville: 21
18. Charlotte: 16

Average Density for all Tracts that have 5,000+ Densities by Rank

1. Milwaukee: 10,394.2
2. Providence: 10,163.5
3. San Jose: 10,114.8
4. Pittsburgh: 8,753.8
5. Las Vegas: 8,604.4
6. Austin: 7,981.4
7. Cleveland: 7,882.1
8. Columbus: 7,821.8
9. Portland: 7,679.8
10. Cincinnati: 7,586.7
11. Sacramento: 7,397.3
12. Virginia Beach: 7,304.1
13. San Antonio: 6,736.5
14. Kansas City: 6,703.7
15. Orlando: 6,689.5
16. Charlotte: 6,678.2
17. Nashville: 6,558.7
18. Indianapolis: 6,170.7

Average Density of Top 15 Densist Tracts by Rank

Milwaukee: 23,786.4
San Jose: 22,225.5
Pittsburgh: 18,581.4
Las Vegas: 18,227.8
Providence: 16,701.2
Portland: 15,401.5
Columbus: 14,733.6
Austin: 13,660.0
Cleveland: 13,458.6
Cincinnati: 12,443.9
Virginia Beach: 12,396.5
Sacramento: 12,261.4
San Antonio: 9,497.6
Orlando: 8,955.3
Kansas City: 8,476.5
Indianapolis: 7,294.0
Nashville: 7,113.9
Charlotte: 6,787.5

Columbus doesn’t do too badly with these numbers and certainly better than I was really expecting. In general, it’s more dense in parts than it gets credit for being. Las Vegas stands out as the most surprising to me, but I guess the built environment there is pretty dense when you think about it, at least in the urban core that these numbers measured. Charlotte, Indianapolis and Nashville have incredibly low densities for being major, moderate-fast growing metros/cities. Columbus and Indianapolis are often called twin cities and compared regularly, but this is one area where there’s a pretty stark difference. I plan to do a formal comparison of the two metros at some point in the future.

In regards to the 5,000+ density tracts, here’s a further breakdown.

All Tracts with a Density of 25,000 or More and % of Total 5,000+ Tracts by Rank

1. Austin: 2 3.3%
2. Milwaukee: 4 2.0%
3. San Jose: 4 1.4%
4. Virginia Beach: 1 1.1%
5. Columbus: 1 1.0%
6. Pittsburgh: 1 0.7%
7. Portland: 1 0.6%
8. Charlotte: 0 0.0%
9. Cincinnati: 0 0.0%
10. Cleveland: 0 0.0%
11. Indianapolis: 0 0.0%
12. Kansas City: 0 0.0%
13. Las Vegas: 0 0.0%
14. Nashville: 0 0.0%
15. Orlando: 0 0.0%
16. Providence: 0 0.0%
17. Sacramento: 0 0.0%
18. San Antonio: 0 0.0%

All Tracts with a Density of 20,000 or More and % of Total 5,000+ Tracts by Rank

1. Milwaukee: 13 6.6%
2. Austin: 3 4.9%
3. Columbus: 3 3.1%
4. Pittsburgh: 4 2.7%
5. San Jose: 6 2.1%
6. Las Vegas: 4 1.4%
7. Providence: 1 1.2%
8. Portland: 2 1.1%
9. Virginia Beach: 1.1%
10. Cleveland: 1 0.5%
11. Charlotte: 0 0.0%
12. Cincinnati: 0 0.0%
13. Indianapolis: 0 0.0%
14. Kansas City: 0 0.0%
15. Nashville: 0 0.0%
16. Orlando: 0 0.0%
17. Sacramento: 0 0.0%
18. San Antonio: 0 0.0%

All Tracts with a Density of 15,000 or More and % of Total 5,000+ Tracts by Rank

1. Milwaukee: 32 16.2%
2. Providence: 12 14.3%
3. San Jose: 31 10.9%
4. Austin: 5 8.2%
5. Pittsburgh: 12 8.2%
6. Columbus: 6 6.1%
7. Las Vegas: 13 4.5%
8. Portland: 6 3.4%
9. Sacramento: 3 1.8%
10. Cincinnati: 1 1.2%
11. Virginia Beach: 1 1.1%
12. Cleveland: 2 0.9%
13. Charlotte: 0 0.0%
14. Indianapolis: 0 0.0%
15. Kansas City: 0 0.0%
16. Nashville: 0 0.0%
17. Orlando: 0 0.0%
18. San Antonio: 0 0.0%

All Tracts with a Density of 10,000 or More and % of Total 5,000+ Tracts by Rank

1. Providence: 37 44.0%
2. San Jose: 112 39.3%
3. Milwaukee: 52 26.3%
4. Pittsburgh: 36 24.5%
5. Las Vegas: 67 23.1%
6. Cleveland: 37 17.5%
7. Cincinnati: 14 16.7%
8. Austin: 9 14.8%
9. Nashville: 3 14.3%
10. Portland: 21 12.1%
11. Virginia Beach: 8 8.7%
12. Orlando: 4 8.5%
13. Columbus: 8 8.2%
14. Sacramento: 13 7.7%
15. Charlotte: 1 6.3%
16. San Antonio: 3 2.5%
17. Kansas City: 1 2.3%
18. Indianapolis: 0 0.0%

All Tracts with a Density of 9,000 or More and % of Total 5,000+ Tracts by Rank

1. Providence: 47 56.0%
2. San Jose: 132 46.3%
3. Las Vegas: 101 34.8%
4. Milwaukee: 65 32.8%
5. Pittsburgh: 47 32.0%
6. Cleveland: 52 24.6%
7. Cincinnati: 19 22.6%
8. Austin: 13 21.3%
9. Portland: 29 16.7%
10. Columbus: 16 16.3%
11. Nashville: 3 14.3%
12. Sacramento: 24 14.3%
13. Kansas City: 6 13.6%
14. Charlotte: 2 12.5%
15. Virginia Beach: 10 10.7%
16. Orlando: 5 10.6%
17. San Antonio: 9 7.6%
18. Indianapolis: 0 0.0%

All Tracts with a Density of 8,000 or More and % of Total 5,000+ Tracts by Rank

1. San Jose: 183 64.2%
2. Providence: 52 61.9%
3. Las Vegas: 136 46.9%
4. Pittsburgh: 63 42.9%
5. Milwaukee: 82 41.4%
6. Cleveland: 87 41.2%
7. Sacramento: 49 29.2%
8. Austin: 17 27.9%
9. Cincinnati: 23 27.4%
10. Columbus: 26 26.5%
11. Portland: 41 23.6%
12. Kansas City: 10 22.7%
13. Orlando: 10 21.3%
14. Virginia Beach: 19 20.7%
15. San Antonio: 17 14.4%
16. Nashville: 3 14.3%
17. Charlotte: 2 12.5%
18. Indianapolis: 2 4.3%

All Tracts with a Density of 7,000 or More and % of Total 5,000+ Tracts by Rank

1. San Jose: 222 77.9%
2. Providence: 58 69.0%
3. Las Vegas: 185 63.8%
4. Cleveland: 119 56.4%
5. Milwaukee: 111 56.1%
6. Pittsburgh: 80 54.4%
7. Sacramento: 83 49.4%
8. Cincinnati: 38 45.2%
9. Columbus: 42 42.9%
10. Virginia Beach: 39 42.4%
11. Portland: 71 40.8%
12. Austin: 23 37.7%
13. Charlotte: 5 31.3%
14. Kansas City: 13 29.5%
15. San Antonio: 32 27.1%
16. Orlando: 12 25.5%
17. Nashville: 4 19.0%
18. Indianapolis: 8 17.4%

All Tracts with a Density of 6,000 or More and % of Total 5,000+ Tracts by Rank

1. San Jose: 260 91.2%
2. Las Vegas: 235 81.0%
3. Providence: 68 81.0%
4. Pittsburgh: 113 76.9%
5. Sacramento: 122 72.6%
6. Cleveland: 153 72.5%
7. Milwaukee: 142 71.7%
8. Columbus: 66 67.3%
9. Portland: 113 64.9%
10. Cincinnati: 54 64.3%
11. Orlando: 29 61.7%
12. San Antonio: 71 60.2%
13. Virginia Beach: 55 59.8%
14. Austin: 35 57.4%
15. Kansas City: 25 56.8%
16. Nashville: 10 47.6%
17. Charlotte: 7 43.8%
18. Indianapolis: 20 43.5%

Top 20 Densist Tracts from all 18 Metros

1. 48,971.9: Virginia Beach #38
2. 48,602.1: San Jose #500902
3. 32,306.4: Pittsburgh #404
4. 31,919.9: Milwaukee #11
5. 31,627.6: Milwaukee #147
6. 29,072: Columbus #181
7. 28,922.9: San Jose #509107
8. 27,544.8: Milwaukee #164
9. 26,825.8: Portland #56
10. 25,543.1: Austin #603
11. 25,271.2: Milwaukee #146
12. 25,229.7: Austin #604
13. 25,195.3: San Jose #509403
14. 25,053.2: San Jose #503118
15. 24,925.7: Columbus #13
16. 24,882.3: Las Vegas #2996
17. 24,666.9: Pittsburgh #9822
18. 24,481.1: Pittsburgh #406
19. 24,043.4: Portland #48
20. 24,025.6: Las Vegas #2207

New Metro and County Population Estimates

The Census issued 2012 estimates for metropolitan areas as well as counties.

First the statewide county maps for numerical change for 2010-2011 and 2011-2012.

Some good and bad with these. The bad is that fewer counties were estimated to be growing from 2011-2012 than were in 2010-2011. The good news it that central core counties improved their growth or slowed their losses, such as Franklin, Cuyahoga and Hamilton. This may mean that population is consolidating around urban cores rather than being spread out… or it may just mean that more counties are losing population.

Top 10 Counties with Greatest Numerical Growth
1. Franklin: +16,273
2. Delaware: +2,444
3. Warren: +1,893
4. Hamilton: +1,350
5. Wood: +1,291
6. Butler: +657
7. Clermont: +619
8. Hancock: +560
9. Stark: +540
10. Geauga: +362

If we take every county estimate, Ohio grew by 10,502, which is a slight improvement from 2011′s 8,447, which itself was faster than 2010′s 7,608. Still very slow, but seemingly getting a bit better each year.

As far as the metropolitan areas, their boundaries were changed last week as new definitions for what constitutes a metro area were introduced. This produced some rather drastic changes to metro areas and their populations.

Old and New Metro Boundaries and their Old and New Populations
Akron: Did not change boundaries and still consists of Summit and Portage counties.
2011: 702,854
2012: 702,262

Canton: Did not change and is still Stark and Carroll counties.
2011: 403,164
2012: 403,455

Cincinnati: Added Union County, Indiana, but dropped Franklin County, Indiana.
2011: 2,122,330
2012: 2,128,603

Cleveland: Did not change and is still Cuyahoga, Lake, Lorain, Geauga and Medina counties.
2011: 2,068,397
2012: 2,063,535

Columbus: Added Perry and Hocking Counties.
2011: 1,925,137
2012: 1,944,002

Dayton: Dropped Preble County.
2011: 801,040
2012: 800,972

Toledo: Dropped Ottawa County.
2011: 609,320
2012: 608,711

Youngstown: Did not change, still Mahoning, Trumbull and Mercer County, PA.
2011: 561,697
2012: 558,206

As you can see, 5 of the 8 are losing population, though most had slower losses in 2012 than they did in 2011. This may also be a sign of population moving toward the urban centers, or again, could just be a blip.

One of the interesting pieces of data about the metro areas is the section on components of population change, meaning where did the growth or loss come from.

Total Metro Births July 1, 2011 to July 1, 2012 and Rank

1. Cincinnati: +27,374
2. Columbus: +25,910
3. Cleveland: +22,484
4. Dayton: +9,414
5. Akron: +7,418
6. Toledo: +7,285
7. Youngstown: +5,446

Total Metro Deaths July 1, 2011 to July 1, 2012 and Rank
1. Cleveland: -20,290
2. Cincinnati: -18,204
3. Columbus: -14,457
4. Dayton: -7,930
5. Youngstown: -6,811
6. Akron: -6,756
7. Toledo: -5,678

Natural Change (Births vs Deaths) July 1,2011 to July 1, 2012 and Rank
1. Columbus: +11,453
2. Cincinnati: +9,170
3. Cleveland: +2,194
4. Toledo: +1,607
5. Dayton: +1,484
6. Akron: +662
7. Youngstown: -1,365

Domestic Migration July 1, 2011 to July 1, 2012 and Rank
1. Columbus: +2,688
2. Akron: -2,248
3. Youngstown: -2,341
4. Dayton: -2,717
5. Toledo: -2,931
6. Cincinnati: -6,036
7. Cleveland: -10,579

Columbus is the only metro seeing positive domestic migration in Ohio.

International Migration July 1, 2011 to July 1, 2012 and Rank
1. Columbus: +4,729
2. Cleveland: +3,555
3. Cincinnati: +3,217
4. Dayton: +1,175
5. Akron: +1,009
6. Youngstown: +778
7. Toledo: +676

Total In-Migration July 1, 2011 to July 1, 2012 and Rank
1. Columbus: +7,417
2. Youngstown: -974
3. Akron: -1,239
4. Dayton: -1,542
5. Toledo: -2,255
6. Cincinnati: -2,819
7. Cleveland: -7,024

Canton is the only other Ohio metro that saw a net postive in-migration for the time period besides Columbus.

Metro Density Comparisons Part 1

Post Update 8/30/2013.

The Columbus Metropolitan Area resides within a group of metros between 1.5 and 2.5 million people. I wanted to take a look at population densities between that group of metros to see how different they really are and where Columbus might fall within them.

Metro Area Population in 2011 and 2012 by Rank
2011 2012
1. Pittsburgh: 2,359,746 — 1. Pittsburgh: 2,360,733
2. Portland, OR: 2,262,605 — 2. Charlotte: 2,296,569
3. San Antonio: 2,194,927 — 3. Portland, OR: 2,289,800
4. Sacramento: 2,176,235 — 4. San Antonio: 2,234,003
5. Orlando: 2,171,360 — 5. Orlando: 2,223,674
6. Cincinnati: 2,138,038 — 6. Sacramento: 2,196,482
7. Cleveland: 2,068,283 — 7. Cincinnati: 2,128,603
8. Kansas City: 2,052,676 — 8. Cleveland: 2,063,535
9. Las Vegas: 1,969,975 — 9. Kansas City: 2,038,724
10. San Jose, CA: 1,865,450 — 10. Las Vegas: 2,000,759
11. Columbus: 1,858,464 — 11. Columbus: 1,944,002
12. Charlotte: 1,795,472 — 12. Indianapolis: 1,928,982
13. Austin: 1,783,519 — 13. San Jose: 1,894,388
14. Indianapolis: 1,778,568 — 14. Austin: 1,834,303
15. Virginia Beach: 1,679,894 — 15. Nashville: 1,726,693
16. Nashville: 1,617,142 — 16. Virginia Beach: 1,699,925
17. Providence, RI: 1,600,224 — 17. Providence: 1,601,374
18. Milwaukee: 1,562,216 — 18. Milwaukee: 1,566,981

As you can see, this is a pretty diverse group, from the Northeast, Midwest, Sun Belt and West Coast.

Metro Area Size in Square Miles in 2011 and 2012 by Rank
20112012
1. Las Vegas: 8,091 — 1. Las Vegas: 8,091
2. Kansas City: 7,951 — 2. San Antonio: 7,387
3. San Antonio: 7,387 — 3. Kansas City: 7,374
4. Sacramento: 6,936 — 4. Sacramento: 6,936
5. Portland, Or: 6,817 — 5. Portland, OR: 6,817
6. Nasvhille: 5,763 — 6. Nashville: 6,379
7. Pittsburgh: 5,706 — 7. Pittsburgh: 5,706
8. Cincinnati: 4,394 — 8. Charlotte: 5,180
9. Austin: 4,280 — 9. Columbus: 4,850
10. Columbus: 3,967 — 10. Cincinnati: 4,394
11. Indianapolis: 3,888 — 11. Indianapolis: 4,341
12. Orlando: 3,491 — 12. Austin: 4,280
13. Virginia Beach: 2,647 — 13, Orlando: 3,491
14. Charlotte: 2,611 — 14. San Jose: 2,695
15. Cleveland: 1,997— 15. Virginia Beach: 2,647
16. Milwaukee: 1,823 — 16. Cleveland: 1,997
17. Providence: 1,636— 17. Milwaukee: 1,823
18. San Jose: 1,304 — 18. Providence: 1,636

Metro Area Population Density Per Square Mile in 2011 and 2012 by Rank
20112012
1. San Jose: 1,430.6 — 1. Cleveland: 1,033.3
2. Cleveland: 1,035.7 — 2. Providence: 978.8
3. Providence: 978.1 — 3. Milwaukee: 859.6
4. Milwaukee: 856.9 — 4. San Jose: 702.9
5. Charlotte: 687.7 — 5. Virginia Beach: 642.2
6. Virginia Beach: 634.6 — 6. Orlando: 637.0
7. Orlando: 622.0 — 7. Cincinnati: 484.4
8. Cincinnati: 486.6 — 8. Indianapolis: 444.4
9. Columbus: 468.5 — 9. Charlotte: 443.4
10. Indianapolis: 457.5 — 10. Austin: 428.6
11. Austin: 416.7 — 11. Pittsburgh: 413.7
12. Pittsburgh: 413.6 — 12. Columbus: 400.8
13. Portland, OR: 331.9 — 13. Portland: 335.9
14. Sacramento: 313.8 — 14. Sacramento: 316.7
15. San Antonio: 297.1 — 15. San Antonio: 302.4
16. Nashville: 280.6 — 16. Kansas City: 276.5
17. Kansas City: 258.2 — 17. Nashville: 270.7
18. Las Vegas: 243.5 — 18. Las Vegas: 247.3

Higher metro population doesn’t necessarily equate to higher density. The smaller metros tend to have higher densities. Columbus is middle of the pack.

Core County Population in 2011 and 2012 by Rank
20112012
1. Clark (Las Vegas): 1,969,975 — 1. Clark (Las Vegas): 2,000,759
2. Santa Clara (San Jose): 1,809,378 — 2. Santa Clara (San Jose): 1,837,504
3. Bexar (San Antonio): 1,756,153 — 3. Bexar (San Antonio) 1,785,704
4. Sacramento (Sacramento): 1,436,105 — 4. Sacramento (Sacramento): 1,450,121
5. Cuyahoga (Cleveland): 1,270,294 — 5. Cuyahoga (Cleveland): 1,265,111
6. Allegheny (Pittsburgh): 1,227,066 — 6. Allegheny (Pittsburgh): 1,229,338
7. Franklin (Columbus): 1,178,799 — 7. Orange (Orlando): 1,202,234
8. Orange (Orlando): 1,169,107 — 8. Franklin: (Columbus): 1,195,338
9. Travis (Austin): 1,063,130 — 9. Travis (Austin): 1,095,584
10. Milwaukee (Milwaukee): 952,532 — 10. Mecklenburg (Charlotte): 969,031
11. Mecklenburg (Charlotte): 944,373 — 11. Milwaukee (Milwaukee): 955,205
12. Marion (Indianapolis): 911,296 — 12. Marion (Indianapolis): 918,977
13. Hamilton (Cincinnati): 800,362 — 13. Hamilton (Cincinnati): 802,038
14. Multnomah (Portland): 748,031 — 14. Multnomah (Portland): 759,256
15. Jackson (Kansas City): 676,360 — 15. Jackson (Kansas City): 677,377
16. Davidson (Nashville): 635,475 — 16. Davidson (Nashville): 648,295
17. Providence (Providence): 626,709 — 17. Providence (Providence): 628,323
18. Virginia Beach (No County): 442,707 — 18. Virginia Beach (No County): 447,021

Core County Area Size in Square Miles in 2011 by Rank

Clark (Las Vegas): 8,091
Santa Clara (San Jose): 1,304
Bexar (San Antonio): 1,257
Travis (Austin): 1,022
Orange (Orlando): 1,004
Sacramento (Sacramento): 995
Allegheny (Pittsburgh): 745
Jackson (Kansas City): 616
Mecklenburg (Charlotte): 546
Franklin (Columbus): 544
Davidson (Nashville): 526
Multnomah (Portland): 466
Cuyahoga (Cleveland): 457
Providence (Providence): 436
Hamilton (Cincinnati): 413
Marion (Indianapolis): 403
Virginia Beach (No County): 248
Milwaukee (Milwaukee): 242

Core County Population Density Per Square Mile in 2011 and 2012 by Rank
20112012
1. Milwaukee (Milwaukee): 3,936.1 — 1. Milwaukee: 3,947.1
2. Cuyahoga (Cleveland): 2,779.6 — 2. Cuyahoga: 2,768.3
3. Marion (Indianapolis): 2,261.3 — 3. Marion: 2,280.3
4. Franklin (Columbus): 2,166.9 — 4. Franklin: 2,197.7
5. Hamilton (Cincinnati): 1,937.9 — 5. Hamilton: 1,942.0
6. Virginia Beach (No County): 1,785.1 — 6. Virginia Beach: 1,802.5
7. Mecklenburg (Charlotte): 1,729.6 — 7. Mecklenburg: 1,774.8
8. Allegheny (Pittsburgh): 1,647.1 — 8. Allegheny: 1,650.1
9. Multnomah (Portland: 1,605.2 — 9. Multnomah: 1,629.3
10. Sacramento (Sacramento): 1,443.3 — 10. Sacramento: 1,457.4
11. Providence (Providence): 1,437.4 — 11. Providence: 1,441.1
12. Bexar (San Antonio): 1,397.1 — 12. Bexar: 1,420.6
13. Santa Clara (San Jose): 1,387.6 — 13. Santa Clara: 1,409.1
14. Davidson (Nashville): 1,208.1 — 14. Davidson: 1,232.5
15. Orange (Orlando): 1,164.4 — 15. Orange: 1,197.4
16. Jackson (Kansas City): 1,098.0 — 16. Jackson: 1,099.6
17. Travis (Austin): 1,040.2 — 17. Travis: 1,072.0
18. Clark (Las Vegas): 243.5 — 18. Clark: 247.3

The core counties of metros within the Midwest are clearly the most dense, with most hovering around or above 2,000 people per square mile. Columbus has the 4th densist core county of the bunch.

City Population in 2011 and 2012 by Rank
20112012
1. San Antonio: 1,359,758— 1. San Antonio: 1,382,951
2. San Jose: 967,487— 2.San Jose: 982,765
3. Indianapolis: 827,609— 3. Austin: 842,592
4. Austin: 820,611— 4. Indianapolis: 836,507
5. Columbus: 797,434— 5. Columbus: 809,798
6. Charlotte: 751,087— 6. Charlotte: 775,202
7. Nashville: 609,644— 7. Nashville: 624,496
8. Milwaukee: 597,867— 8. Portland: 603,106
9. Portland: 593,820— 9. Milwaukee: 598,916
10. Las Vegas: 589,317— 10. Las Vegas: 596,424
11. Sacramento: 472,178— 11. Sacramento: 475,516
12. Kansas City: 463,202— 12. Kansas City: 464,310
13. Virginia Beach: 442,707— 13. Virginia Beach: 447,021
14. Cleveland: 393,806— Cleveland: 390,928
15. Pittsburgh: 307,484— Pittsburgh: 306,211
16. Cincinnati: 296,223— Cincinnati: 296,550
17. Orlando: 243,195— Orlando: 249,562
18. Providence: 178,053— Providence: 178,432


City Area Size in Square Miles in 2011 by Rank

Nashville: 527.9
Virginia Beach: 497.3
San Antonio: 412.1
Indianapolis: 372.0
Kansas City: 319.0
Charlotte: 297.7
Austin: 297.0
Columbus: 217.2
San Jose: 180.0
Portland: 145.1
Las Vegas: 135.8
Orlando: 110.7
Sacramento: 100.1
Milwaukee: 96.8
Cleveland: 82.5
Cincinnati: 79.4
Pittsburgh: 58.3
Providence: 20.5

City Population Density Per Square Mile in 2011 and 2012* by Rank
2011
1. Providence: 8,685.5— 1. Providence: 8,704.0
2. Milwaukee: 6,176.3— 2. Milwaukee: 6,187.1
3. San Jose: 5,374.9— 3. San Jose: 5,459.8
4. Pittsburgh: 5274.2— 4. Pittsburgh: 5,252.3
5. Cleveland: 4,773.4— 5. Sacramento: 4,750.4
6. Sacramento: 4,717.1— 6. Cleveland: 4,738.5
7. Las Vegas: 4,339.6— 7. Las Vegas: 4,391.9
8. Portland: 4,092.5— 8. Portland: 4,156.5
9. Cincinnati: 3,726.1— 9. Cincinnati: 3,734.9
10. Columbus: 3,671.4— 10. Columbus: 3,728.4
11. San Antonio: 3,299.6— 11. San Antonio: 3,355.9
12. Austin: 2,763.0— 12. Austin: 2,837.0
13. Charlotte: 2,523.0— 13. Charlotte: 2,604.0
14. Indianapolis: 2,224.8— 14. Orlando: 2,254.4
15. Orlando: 2,196.9— 15. Indianapolis: 2,248.7
16. Kansas City: 1,452.0— 16. Kansas City: 1,455.5
17. Nashville: 1,154.8— 17. Nashville: 1,183.0
18. Virginia Beach: 890.2— 18. Virginia Beach: 898.9

*2012 numbers assumes city area size did not change.

So for the most part, when it comes to metro density, Columbus runs mostly in the middle, although it does have a rather dense core county.

I’ll examine some tract densities in Part 2, as well as the overall trends for Columbus and w
here it might fall come 2020.