Columbus City Diversity and Comparison to Peers




In the 2nd post related to the recently-released Census demographic data, I’ll look at city diversity and how it’s been changing since 2005.

Rank by City of Total White, non-Hispanic Population by Year
2005————————————–2010————————————-2017

1. Chicago, IL: 819,215————1. Chicago: 853,910—————1. Chicago: 879,334
2. Indianapolis, IN: 491,044——2. Indianapolis: 482,195———–2. Columbus: 490,149
3. Columbus: 442,958————-3. Columbus: 470,971————-3. Indianapolis: 468,665
4. Portland, OR: 382,033———-4. Portland: 417,876—————4. Austin: 453,801
5. San Antonio, TX: 356,420—–5. Austin: 384,065——————5. Portland: 452,132
6. Austin, TX: 347,013————-6. San Antonio: 351,420———6. San Antonio: 375,463
7. Nashville, TN: 314,518——–7. Nashville: 339,030————–7. Nashville: 368,195
8. Charlotte, NC: 302,789——-8. Charlotte: 331,357—————8. Charlotte: 360,270
9. Virginia Beach, VA: 290,891–9. Virginia Beach: 282,812——9. Omaha: 311,349
10. San Jose, CA: 281,822—–10. Las Vegas: 280,604———–10. Las Vegas: 280,201
11. Las Vegas, NV: 281,679—-11. Omaha: 277,606———–11. Virginia Beach: 277,338
12. Omaha, NE: 267,685——–12. San Jose: 265,311————12. Kansas City: 272,548
13. Kansas City, MO: 249,123—13. Kansas City: 247,473——13. San Jose: 267,315
14. Wichita, KS: 245,527———-14. Wichita: 245,146————14. Minneapolis: 252,304
15. Milwaukee, WI: 219,891——15. Minneapolis: 242,848——15. Wichita: 243,143
16. Minneapolis, MN: 216,975—16. Milwaukee: 221,514——–16. Lincoln: 226,297
17. Lincoln, NE: 197,287———-17. Lincoln: 216,076————-17. Milwaukee: 207,043
18. Toledo: 183,746—————-18. Pittsburgh: 203,622———18. Pittsburgh: 196,687
19. Pittsburgh, PA: 180,725——19. Fort Wayne: 179,646——-19. Madison: 187,566
20. Madison, WI: 161,631——–20. Madison: 178,307————20. Fort Wayne: 166,912
21. St. Paul, MN: 161,329——–21. Toledo: 177,341————–21. Toledo: 164,104
22. Sacramento, CA: 160,599—22. Sacramento: 165,610——22. Sacramento: 159,291
23. Fort Wayne, IN: 157,672—–23. St. Paul: 159,704———–23. St. Paul: 152,558
24. Des Moines, IA: 149,786—–24. Des Moines: 145,937——24. Cincinnati: 143,028
25. Cleveland: 147,359———–25. Cincinnati: 143,120———25. Des Moines: 137,235
26. St. Louis, MO: 143,590——26. Cleveland: 137,977———26. St. Louis: 134,471
27. Cincinnati: 138,486———–27. St. Louis: 134,146———–27. Cleveland: 126,714
28. Akron: 128,976—————-28. Akron: 120,800————–28. Grand Rapids: 114,349
29. Grand Rapids, MI: 113,791—29. Grand Rapids: 104,636—29. Akron: 113,951
30. Orlando, FL: 92,326———–30. Orlando: 96,867————-30. Orlando: 95,876
31. Detroit, MI: 77,163————-31. Dayton: 72,663————–31. Dayton: 71,094
32. Dayton: 67,581—————–32. Providence: 64,284——–32. Detroit: 70,931
33. Providence, RI: 64,223——-33. Detroit: 55,298————–33. Providence: 59,321

Columbus moved from 3rd to 2nd over the period.

Rank by City of Total Black, non-Hispanic Population by Year
2005—————————————–2010———————————2017

1. Chicago: 938,097—————–1. Chicago: 895,294———–1. Chicago: 797,253
2. Detroit: 683,999——————–2. Detroit: 587,707————-2. Detroit: 529,593
3. Milwaukee: 222,040————–3. Charlotte: 251,274———-3. Charlotte: 292,104
4. Cleveland: 221,797—————4. Milwaukee: 230,473——–4. Columbus: 248,476
5. Charlotte: 205,216—————-5. Indianapolis: 226,314——-5. Indianapolis: 236,606
6. Indianapolis: 193,948————6. Columbus: 216,486———6. Milwaukee: 228,720
7. Columbus: 179,197—————7. Cleveland: 208,528———7. Cleveland: 186,073
8. St. Louis: 168,768—————-8. Nashville: 171,104———–8. Nashville: 180,830
9. Nashville: 148,051—————-9. St. Louis: 157,382———–9. St. Louis: 143,761
10. Kansas City: 131,694———-10. Kansas City: 138,461—–10. Kansas City: 138,346
11. Cincinnati: 131,010————-11. Cincinnati: 131,909——–11. Cincinnati: 127,589
12. Pittsburgh: 81,758————–12. Virginia Beach: 79,583—-12. San Antonio: 97,925
13. Virginia Beach: 80,004——–13. San Antonio: 79,307——13. Virginia Beach: 82,181
14. Orlando: 73,736—————–14. Toledo: 75,033————-14. Minneapolis: 75,006
15. Toledo: 72,190——————-15. Pittsburgh: 71,539——–15. Toledo: 74,906
16. Sacramento: 71,452————16. Orlando: 70,988————16. Orlando: 72,796
17. San Antonio: 70,723————17. Minneapolis: 63,749——17. Austin: 69,860
18. Dayton: 60,196——————-18. Sacramento: 61,976——18. Sacramento: 67,305
19. Akron: 59,810——————–19. Austin: 61,833————–19. Las Vegas: 65,663
20. Las Vegas: 59,780————–20. Dayton: 61,402————-20. Pittsburgh: 65,268
21. Austin: 59,583——————-21. Akron: 60,653—————-21. Akron: 61,461
22. Minneapolis: 57,499————22. Las Vegas: 60,187———22. Dayton: 57,043
23. Omaha: 50,333——————23. Omaha: 55,086————-23. Omaha: 56,098
24. Grand Rapids: 40,408———24. Wichita: 42,662————-24. St. Paul: 51,737
25. Wichita: 39,165—————–25. Grand Rapids: 41,848—–25. Wichita: 40,756
26. Fort Wayne: 35,221———–26. St. Paul: 41,923————-26. Grand Rapids: 38,130
27. St. Paul: 34,903—————-27. Fort Wayne: 39,016——–27. Fort Wayne: 37,941
28. Portland: 30,828—————28. Portland: 37,355————28. Portland: 34,624
29. San Jose: 27,446————–29. San Jose: 29,831———-29. San Jose: 28,126
30. Providence: 18,794———–30. Des Moines: 19,962——-30. Providence: 27,274
31. Des Moines: 16,709———-31. Providence: 19,265——–31. Des Moines: 22,170
32. Madison: 12,660————–32. Madison: 17,560————32. Madison: 14,185
33. Lincoln: 7,082——————33. Lincoln: 9,023—————33. Lincoln: 11,487

Columbus moved up from 7th to 4th in total Black, non-Hispanic during the period. Surprisingly, quite a few cities have actually been losing this demographic since 2010 at least.

Rank by City of Total Asian, non-Hispanic Population by Year
2005————————————-2010——————————————2017

1. San Jose: 269,186————–1. San Jose: 303,227—————–1. San Jose: 366,134
2. Chicago: 127,686—————-2. Chicago: 148,280——————2. Chicago: 179,176
3. Sacramento: 80,307————3. Sacramento: 84,556————-3. Sacramento: 93,476
4. Portland: 36,278—————–4. Austin: 46,575———————-4. Austin: 71,539
5. Austin: 35,239——————–5. Portland: 43,185——————-5. St. Paul: 61,082
6. St. Paul: 35,184——————6. St. Paul: 41,989——————-6. Charlotte: 55,142
7. Columbus: 27,125—————7. Las Vegas: 37,406—————7. Columbus: 53,027
8. Las Vegas: 25,077————–8. Charlotte: 37,181—————–8. Portland: 52,219
9. Charlotte: 23,356—————-9. Columbus: 35,468—————-9. Las Vegas: 44,735
10. Virginia Beach: 22,501——10. San Antonio: 29,200———–10. San Antonio: 38,119
11. San Antonio: 20,492———11. Virginia Beach: 27,303—–11. Virginia Beach: 29,735
12. Minneapolis: 20,189———12. Milwaukee: 22,670————–12. Minneapolis: 26,833
13. Milwaukee: 19,596———–13. Minneapolis: 21,426————13. Indianapolis: 26,548
14. Nashville: 16,943————-14. Wichita: 19,420——————14. Milwaukee: 25,624
15. Wichita: 15,417—————15. Indianapolis: 17,137————15. Madison: 24,455
16. Madison: 12,708————–16. Nashville: 17,045—————16. Nashville: 24,034
17. Indianapolis: 12,312———17. Madison: 16,671—————-17. Wichita: 19,548
18. Providence: 10,751———-18. Pittsburgh: 12,036————–18. Pittsburgh: 19,357
19. Pittsburgh: 10,727————19. Providence: 11,497————19. Omaha: 17,412
20. Kansas City: 10,674———20. Lincoln: 10,452——————20. Des Moines: 17,143
21. Detroit: 9,577——————21. Kansas City: 10,263———–21. Kansas City: 15,213
22. Des Moines: 8,796———–22. Des Moines: 8,867————-22. Fort Wayne: 14,039
23. Lincoln: 7,513—————–23. St. Louis: 8,717—————–23. Lincoln: 13,992
24. St. Louis: 7,046—————24. Omaha: 8,397——————-24. Orlando: 11,852
25. Omaha: 6,971—————–25. Orlando: 7,870——————25. Detroit: 11,790
26. Cincinnati: 6,874————-26. Fort Wayne: 6,945————–26. St. Louis: 10,404
27. Cleveland: 6,289————27. Detroit: 6,549———————27. Providence: 9,361
28. Orlando: 5,528—————28. Cincinnati: 5,938—————-28. Cleveland: 9,217
29. Fort Wayne: 4,241———-29. Cleveland: 5,392—————-29. Akron: 8,007
30. Toledo: 4,150—————-30. Akron: 4,567———————30. Cincinnati: 7,906
31. Akron: 3,497—————–31. Grand Rapids: 3,695———–31. Grand Rapids: 7,056
32. Grand Rapids: 2,847——32. Toledo: 3,125——————–32. Toledo: 3,679
33. Dayton: 1,827—————33. Dayton: 1,231——————–33. Dayton: 848

Columbus maintained its rank since 2005.

Rank by City of Total Hispanic Population by Year

2005——————————————–2010————————————2017

1. Chicago: 778,234—————1. San Antonio: 853,654———-1. San Antonio: 969,065
2. San Antonio: 735,458———–2. Chicago: 763,968—————2. Chicago: 787,978
3. San Jose: 279,420————–3. San Jose: 318,389————–3. San Jose: 332,603
4. Austin: 223,361——————4. Austin: 288,130——————4. Austin: 324,973
5. Las Vegas: 153,813————5. Las Vegas: 181,923————-5. Las Vegas: 219,220
6. Sacramento: 111,559———6. Sacramento: 124,461———–6. Sacramento: 141,752
7. Milwaukee: 80,945————-7. Milwaukee: 104,619————-7. Milwaukee: 133,812
8. Providence: 60,008————-8. Charlotte: 96,246—————-8. Charlotte: 122,904
9. Charlotte: 58,466—————9. Indianapolis: 78,467————-9. Indianapolis: 93,042
10. Wichita: 49,928—————10. Providence: 76,645————10. Orlando: 86,305
11. Indianapolis: 47,764———11. Nashville: 61,212—————11. Providence: 77,893
12. Detroit: 46,993—————-12. Wichita: 59,823——————12. Nashville: 69,574
13. Orlando: 43,978————–13. Portland: 58,986—————–13. Wichita: 68,389
14. Portland: 43,324————–14. Orlando: 56,061—————–14. Portland: 67,551
15. Omaha: 39,674—————15. Omaha: 53,661——————15. Omaha: 66,056
16. Nashville: 37,463————-16. Kansas City: 49,800————16. Columbus: 55,782
17. Minneapolis: 37,017———17. Detroit: 45,580——————-17. Detroit: 48,328
18. Kansas City: 35,995———18. Columbus: 43,276————–18. Cleveland: 47,962
19. Grand Rapids: 32,368——19. Cleveland: 36,067————–19. Minneapolis: 46,375
20. Cleveland: 32,085———–20. Minneapolis: 34,504———–20. Kansas City: 45,975
21. Columbus: 24,607———–21. Grand Rapids: 30,659——21. Virginia Beach: 36,723
22. St. Paul: 22,402————–22. Virginia Beach: 29,206—–22. Grand Rapids: 32,016
23. Virginia Beach: 20,803—–23. St. Paul: 28,725————–23. Des Moines: 31,333
24. Des Moines: 18,952——–24. Des Moines: 23,832———-24. St. Paul: 30,007
25. Toledo: 18,404————–25. Toledo: 21,346——————25. Fort Wayne: 24,724
26. Fort Wayne: 16,438——-26. Fort Wayne: 19,576————26. Toledo: 22,796
27. Madison: 11,997———–27. Lincoln: 16,007——————27. Lincoln: 21,921
28. Lincoln: 9,672—————28. Madison: 14,062—————28. Madison: 20,741
29. St. Louis: 8,268————-29. St. Louis: 11,207————–29. St. Louis: 12,447
30. Pittsburgh: 5,018———-30. Cincinnati: 8,710—————30. Cincinnati: 11,787
31. Cincinnati: 3,855———–31. Pittsburgh: 7,282————–31. Pittsburgh: 9,212
32. Akron: 3,485—————-32. Akron: 3,990——————–32. Dayton: 5,765
33. Dayton: 1,693————–33. Dayton: 3,180——————-33. Akron: 5,536

Columbus moved up from 21st to 16th in the total Hispanic population.

Rank by City of Total Other, non-Hispanic Population by Year

2005——————————————-2010—————————————–2017

1. Chicago: 38,694—————1. Chicago: 37,379——————–1. Chicago: 58,721
2. San Jose: 29,456————2. San Jose: 32,439——————–2. Portland: 41,595
3. Sacramento: 21,370———-3. Sacramento: 30,900—————3. San Jose: 41,175
4. Portland: 21,164————–4. Portland: 28,027———————4. Sacramento: 40,066
5. Indianapolis: 20,242———-5. Las Vegas: 24,521—————–5. Columbus: 34,467
6. Columbus: 20,096————-6. Columbus: 23,738—————–6. Indianapolis: 32,525
7. San Antonio: 19,130———-7. San Antonio: 20,778————–7. Las Vegas: 31,889
8. Minneapolis: 18,580———-8. Minneapolis: 20,753————–8. San Antonio: 31,341
9. Detroit: 18,324—————–9. Virginia Beach: 20,268———-9. Austin: 30,541
10. Las Vegas: 18,304———-10. Indianapolis: 20,086———-10. Charlotte: 28,632
11. Virginia Beach: 16,685—-11. Charlotte: 18,360————–11. Virginia Beach: 24,458
12. Milwaukee: 14,476———-12. Detroit: 16,776—————–12. Nashville: 23,334
13. Kansas City: 13,399——–13. Milwaukee: 16,311———–13. Minneapolis: 21,808
14. Austin: 13,261—————-14. Wichita: 16,091—————14. Milwaukee: 20,166
15. Charlotte: 11,771————-15. Omaha: 15,519————–15. Wichita: 18,763
16. Wichita: 11,545—————16. Austin: 14,915—————-16. Kansas City: 16,743
17. Omaha: 8,552—————–17. Kansas City: 14,668——–17. Omaha: 15,988
18. St. Paul: 7,741—————-18. Nashville: 14,227————18. Cleveland: 15,586
19. Toledo: 7,447—————–19. St. Paul: 13,098————–19. Orlando: 13,429
20. Cincinnati: 7,315————-20. Pittsburgh: 11,280———–20. Detroit: 12,461
21. Cleveland: 7,004————-21. Toledo: 10,134—————21. Pittsburgh: 11,890
22. Providence: 6,488———–22. Akron: 9,020——————22. St. Paul: 11,220
23. Pittsburgh: 6,138————23. Fort Wayne: 8,513———–23. Fort Wayne: 11,180
24. St. Louis: 6,058————–24. Cleveland: 8,276————-24. Lincoln: 11,037
25. Fort Wayne: 5,774———-25. St. Louis: 7,704————–25. Toledo: 11,009
26. Orlando: 5,731—————26. Lincoln: 7,483—————-26. Cincinnati: 10,995
27. Nashville: 5,687————-27. Grand Rapids: 7,376——–27. Des Moines: 9,627
28. Madison: 4,708————–28. Orlando: 7,251—————28. Akron: 8,894
29. Lincoln: 4,508—————-29. Cincinnati: 7,230————29. Madison: 8,292
30. Akron: 4,431—————–30. Madison: 7,177————–30. St. Louis: 7,543
31. Grand Rapids: 4,154——31. Providence: 6,471———–31. Grand Rapids: 7,260
32. Des Moines: 2,674———32. Des Moines: 5,598———-32. Providence: 6,539
33. Dayton: 1,382—————33. Dayton: 3,025—————-33. Dayton: 5,629

Finally, Columbus moved up from 6th to 5th in the total of Other, non-Hispanic population. Overall, Columbus ranks fairly well in totals vs. its peers, as one might expect given that it is one of the largest cities in the grouping. However, to truly find out how it compares with these other cities, you have to look at percentages, which tells how much of the city’s population is made up of each group.


Columbus ranks in the middle of the pack for its % of Non-Hispanic White population. Like in most cities, even while this demographic is growing in total numbers in Columbus, the % of total population continues to fall.


Columbus ranked in the top 3rd of peer cities for its % of Non-Hispanic Black population.


Columbus also ranked in the top 3rd for its Non-Hispanic Asian population.


Columbus ranks poorly with Hispanics in the group, ranking near the bottom.


Finally, Columbus ranks in the middle for its Non-Hispanic Other population.

So what’s the final ranking for where Columbus is with diversity compared to its peers in 2017? To find out, I assigned points based on ranked position in each 5 racial categories and took the average of the positions in each 5. The result is that the higher the average number, the lower the overall diversity.

So based on this, Columbus ranks in the top half of national and Midwest peers for diversity.

*Note: Normally, Youngstown would be included, but the data was not available.




Columbus Foreign-Born Population and Comparison to Peers





Given that the 2017 demographic information was released yesterday, it’s time to revisit this comparison and update it with the new data.

First up, let’s take a look at foreign-born populations. I have looked at this topic some in the past, but I have never done a full-scale comparison for this topic.

Total Foreign-Born Population Rank by City 2000, 2010 and 2017
2000—————————————-2010———————————-2017
1. Chicago, IL: 628,903———–1. Chicago: 557,674—————1. Chicago: 563,688
2. San Jose, CA: 329,750——–2. San Jose: 366,194————-2. San Jose: 417,148
3. San Antonio, TX: 133,675—-3. San Antonio: 192,741———-3. San Antonio: 212,109
4. Austin, TX: 109,006————4. Austin: 148,431——————4. Austin: 177,844
5. Las Vegas, NV: 90,656——-5. Las Vegas: 130,503————-5. Charlotte: 147,074
6. Sacramento, CA: 82,616—–6. Chalotte: 106,047—————6. Las Vegas: 139,790
7. Portland, OR: 68,976———7. Sacramento: 96,105————-7. Sacramento: 111,904
8. Charlotte, NC: 59,849——–8. Columbus: 86,663—————-8. Columbus: 105,826
9. Minneapolis, MN: 55,475—–9. Portland: 83,026—————–9. Indianapolis: 89,465
10. Columbus: 47,713———–10. Indianapolis: 74,407———–10. Portland: 89,050
11. Milwaukee, WI: 46,122—–11. Nashville: 73,327—————11. Nashville: 86,271
12. Detroit, MI: 45,541———–12. Minneapolis: 57,846———–12. Minneapolis: 69,567
13. Providence, RI: 43,947—–13. Milwaukee: 57,222————-13. Orlando: 68,811
14. St. Paul, MN: 41,138——-14. Providence: 52,920————14. St. Paul: 64,056
15. Nashville, TN: 38,936——-15. St. Paul: 50,366—————-15. Milwaukee: 59,443
16. Indianapolis, IN: 36,067—-16. Orlando: 43,747—————-16. Providence: 54,520
17. Virginia Beach, VA: 28,276–17. Virginia Beach: 40,756—–17. Omaha: 51,041
18. Wichita, KS: 27,938———18. Omaha: 39,288—————18. Virginia Beach: 42,319
19. Orlando, FL: 26,741——–19. Wichita: 39,128—————–19. Detroit: 41,374
20. Omaha, NE: 25,687———-20. Kansas City: 35,532———20. Wichita: 40,427
21. Kansas City, MO: 25,632—21. Detroit: 34,307—————-21. Kansas City: 37,833
22. Cleveland: 21,372————22. Madison: 24,929————–22. Madison: 32,066
23. Grand Rapids, MI: 20,814—23. St. Louis: 23,011————23. Des Moines: 29,876
24. St Louis, MO: 19,542——–24. Lincoln: 22,214—————24. Pittsburgh:26,504
25. Pittsburgh, PA: 18,874——-25. Des Moines: 20,798——–25. Grand Rapids: 26,014
26. Madison, WI: 18,792———26. Pittsburgh: 18,698———–26. Lincoln: 25,689
27. Des Moines, IA: 15,713—–27. Cleveland: 17,739————27. St. Louis: 23,659
28. Lincoln, NE: 13,246———-28. Grand Rapids: 16,615——-28. Fort Wayne: 22,186
29. Cincinnati: 12,461————29. Cincinnati: 16,531————29. Cleveland: 21,992
30. Fort Wayne, IN: 10,187—–30. Fort Wayne: 15,286———30. Cincinnati: 19,085
31. Toledo: 9,475——————31. Toledo: 11,159—————31. Akron: 13,423
32. Akron: 6,911——————-32. Akron: 8,524——————-32. Toledo: 11,260
33. Dayton: 3,245—————–33. Dayton: 5,102——————33. Dayton: 6,743
34. Youngstown: 1,605———-34. Youngstown: 3,695———–34. Youngstown: 1,401

Here’s the 2000-2017 total change.

And the 2000-2017 change by %.

So Columbus has had above average total and % growth compared to its peers nationally since 2000. What about more recently?

Total change 2010-2017.

And the 2010-2017 change by %.

So now that we know how many foreign-born immigrants are arriving, let’s take a look at where they are coming from.

Total Foreign-Born Residents From Europe in 2000 and 2017
2000———————————————–2017
1. Chicago: 145,462———————1. Chicago: 96,656
2. San Jose: 21,904———————2. San Jose: 25,147
3. Portland: 17,572———————-3. Portland: 16,548
4. Las Vegas: 9,070———————4. Austin: 13,337
5. Cleveland: 8,796———————-5. Charlotte: 9,775
6. St. Louis: 8,543———————–6. Las Vegas: 8,536
7. San Antonio: 8,323——————7. San Antonio: 7,852
8. Sacramento: 8,204——————8. Virginia Beach: 7,368
9. Milwaukee: 7,841——————–9. Columbus: 6,860
10. Charlotte: 7,487——————–10. Indianapolis: 6,344
11. Austin: 7,474————————11. Sacramento: 6,008
12. Pittsburgh: 7,413——————-12. Nashville: 5,778
13. Columbus: 7,017——————-13. Orlando: 5,516
14. Indianapolis: 6,543—————-14. Minneapolis: 5,477
15. Virginia Beach: 6,333————-15. Milwaukee: 4,388
16. Detroit: 5,600————————16. Pittsburgh: 4,265
17. Minneapolis: 5,409—————–17. Providence: 4,022
18. Providence: 5,126——————18. Lincoln: 3,908
19. Nashville: 4,859——————–19. St. Louis: 3,680
20. Cincinnati: 3,851——————-20. Cincinnati: 3,556
21. Grand Rapids: 3,396————–21. Omaha: 3,483
22. Omaha: 3,320———————–22. Cleveland: 3,399
23. St. Paul: 3,255———————-23. Kansas City: 3,362
24. Des Moines: 3,216—————-24. Madison: 2,867
25. Kansas City: 2,985—————-25. St. Paul: 2,394
26. Madison: 2,871——————–26. Detroit: 2,393
27. Lincoln: 2,701———————-27. Fort Wayne: 2,388
28. Akron: 2,687———————–28. Des Moines: 2,156
29. Orlando: 2,509——————–29. Wichita: 1,660
30. Fort Wayne: 2,076—————30. Grand Rapids: 1,517
31. Toledo: 2,020———————31. Akron: 1,286
32. Wichita: 2,004———————32. Toledo: 1,242
33. Dayton: 901———————–33. Dayton: 877
34. Youngstown: 870—————-34. Youngstown: 173

Columbus had a high number of Europeans versus most peers, but almost all cities saw drops in this demographic between 2000 and 2017, some quite drastic. Columbus’ drop was relatively minor.

Total Foreign-born Population from Asia 2000 and 2017
2000————————————————–2017
1. San Jose: 182,712—————————1. San Jose: 262,208
2. Chicago: 112,932—————————-2. Chicago: 140,434
3. Sacramento: 40,253————————-3. Austin: 57,584
4. Portland: 26,271——————————4. Sacramento: 53,731
5. Austin: 25,036——————————–5. Charlotte: 46,698
6. St. Paul: 23,245——————————6. Columbus: 43,706
7. Columbus: 22,354—————————7. San Antonio: 40,642
8. Minneapolis: 17,376————————8. Portland: 38,224
9. Las Vegas: 17,062————————–9. Las Vegas: 35,087
10. San Antonio: 15,840———————-10. St. Paul: 34,678
11. Charlotte: 15,734————————–11. Nashville: 26,155
12. Virginia Beach: 15,176——————-12. Indianapolis: 23,934
13. Detroit: 15,114——————————13. Virginia Beach: 23,625
14. Nashville: 12,573—————————14. Madison: 18,795
15. Milwaukee: 12,114————————-15. Detroit: 18,681
16. Wichita: 10,826—————————–16. Milwaukee: 17,838
17. Madison: 9,736—————————–17. Minneapolis: 15,967
18. Indianapolis: 9,190————————-18. Pittsburgh: 15,873
19. Pittsburgh: 7,938—————————-19. Wichita: 15,466
20. Providence: 7,871————————–20. Omaha: 14,504
21. Kansas City: 7,312————————-21. Lincoln: 13,804
22. Lincoln: 6,691——————————-22. Kansas City: 12,043
23. St. Louis: 6,425—————————–23. Fort Wayne: 10,972
24. Omaha: 6,302——————————-24. Des Moines: 10,691
25. Cleveland: 6,213—————————25. St. Louis: 9,632
26. Des Moines: 5,239————————26. Orlando: 8,122
27. Orlando: 4,530—————————–27. Akron: 7,862
28. Cincinnati: 4,326————————–28. Cleveland: 7,450
29. Toledo: 3,847——————————29. Providence: 6,668
30. Grand Rapids: 3,206———————30. Grand Rapids: 6,585
31. Akron: 3,099——————————-31. Toledo: 6,196
32. Fort Wayne: 2,792————————32. Cincinnati: 6,002
33. Dayton: 903———————————33. Dayton: 1,614
34. Youngstown: 338————————–34. Youngstown: 448

Columbus ranks even higher with its foreign-born Asian population.

Total Foreign-born Population from Africa 2000 and 2017
2000—————————————————2017
1. Minneapolis: 12,765——————–1. Columbus: 33,607
2. Chicago: 12,613————————-2. Chicago: 26,995
3. Columbus: 9,530————————3. Minneapolis: 25,286
4. San Jose: 5,189————————-4. Nashville: 18,387
5. Charlotte: 4,722————————–5. Charlotte: 18,234
6. St. Paul: 4,697—————————-6. Indianapolis: 17,452
7. Nashville: 4,183————————–7. St. Paul: 15,926
8. Detroit: 3,249—————————–8. Omaha: 7,496
9. Providence: 3,138———————–9. San Jose: 7,400
10. Indianapolis: 2,650——————–10. Portland: 7,059
11. Portland: 2,430————————-11. Austin: 6,469
12. Austin: 2,263—————————-12. Des Moines: 6,124
13. Kansas City: 2,192——————–13. San Antonio: 5,718
14. Cincinnati: 1,781———————–14. Kansas City: 5,051
15. St. Louis: 1,500————————-15. St. Louis: 4,977
16. Omaha: 1,497—————————16. Providence: 4,697
17. San Antonio: 1,358——————–17. Milwaukee: 4,423
18. Milwaukee: 1,332———————-18. Cincinnati: 4,207
19. Cleveland: 1,075———————–19. Grand Rapids: 3,754
20. Sacramento: 1,051——————–20. Sacramento: 2,955
21. Des Moines: 1,038——————–21. Pittsburgh: 2,731
22. Madison: 991—————————22. Cleveland: 2,728
23. Orlando: 983—————————23. Orlando: 2,552
24. Wichita: 946—————————-24. Akron: 2,311
25. Las Vegas: 916———————–25. Madison: 2,180
26. Pittsburgh: 905————————26. Wichita: 2,142
27. Virginia Beach: 840——————27. Las Vegas: 1,846
28. Grand Rapids: 718——————-28. Lincoln: 1,680
29. Toledo: 638—————————-29. Dayton: 1,397
30. Lincoln: 637—————————30. Detroit: 1,082
31. Dayton: 522—————————-31. Virginia Beach: 847
32. Fort Wayne: 384———————-32. Fort Wayne: 628
33. Akron: 197—————————–33. Toledo: 615
34. Youngstown: 50———————-34. Youngstown: 0

Columbus has claimed the number 1 spot in its foreign-born African population, passing previous top city Minneapolis.

And finally, the total foreign-born population from the Americas in 2000 and 2017
2000—————————————————-2017
1. Chicago: 357,235————————–1. Chicago: 297,926
2. San Jose: 117,989————————2. San Antonio: 157,629
3. San Antonio: 107,906——————–3. San Jose: 120,657
4. Austin: 73,935——————————4. Austin: 99,482
5. Las Vegas: 63,277————————5. Las Vegas: 93,693
6. Charlotte: 31,625————————–6. Charlotte: 72,211
7. Sacramento: 28,927———————-7. Orlando: 52,421
8. Providence: 27,649———————–8. Sacramento: 42,632
9. Milwaukee: 24,781————————9. Indianapolis: 41,554
10. Detroit: 21,527—————————10. Providence: 39,093
11. Portland: 20,939————————-11. Nashville: 35,719
12. Minneapolis: 19,648——————–12. Milwaukee: 32,630
13. Orlando: 18,639————————-13. Portland: 25,417
14. Indianapolis: 17,530——————–14. Omaha: 25,385
15. Nashville: 17,125————————15. Minneapolis: 22,688
16. Omaha: 14,467————————–16. Columbus: 21,578
17. Wichita: 13,988—————————17. Wichita: 20,983
18. Grand Rapids: 13,477——————18. Detroit: 19,143
19. Kansas City: 12,948———————19. Kansas City: 17,377
20. St. Paul: 9,804—————————-20. Grand Rapids: 14,158
21. Columbus: 8,596————————21. St. Paul: 10,878
22. Des Moines: 6,201———————-22. Des Moines: 10,627
23. Virginia Beach: 5,754——————23. Virginia Beach: 10,415
24. Cleveland: 5,192————————24. Cleveland: 8,386
25. Madison: 5,080————————–25. Fort Wayne: 8,198
26. Fort Wayne: 4,930———————-26. Madison: 8,031
27. Lincoln: 3,106—————————-27. Lincoln: 6,190
28. St. Louis: 2,961————————–28. Cincinnati: 5,320
29. Toledo: 2,942—————————-29. St. Louis: 5,008
30. Pittsburgh: 2,463————————30. Pittsburgh: 3,443
31. Cincinnati: 2,432————————31. Toledo: 3,207
32. Dayton: 919——————————32. Dayton: 2,855
33. Akron: 891——————————-33. Akron: 1,699
34. Youngstown: 333———————–34. Youngstown: 780

Columbus does the worst with this group, but even here it moved up 5 spots in the rankings.

The rest of the foreign-born population is made up of small groups of people from Oceania- or basically island nations.



2017 City Demographic Estimates Continue to Show a Changing City

The 2017 Census estimates came out today for cities and counties. The estimates can be found here.

Highlights for the City of Columbus
-The non-Hispanic Asian population continues to skyrocket, up over 67% since 2010.
-Beyond that, all other racial groups saw population growth within the city since 2010.
-The foreign-born population has climbed above 105,000, and now represents 12% of the total population, the highest % level since 1890.
-Every age group has increased since 2010, but the older working-age population increased the most, as seen below:
19 and Under: +17,962
20-34: +22,627
35-64: +32,045
65+: +22,234

Check out all of the City, County and Metro Area demographic and population data on the Columbus Demographics page.

Before and After: The Near East Side Transformation




Given the popularity of the Weinland Park Before and After, I am finally getting around to posting this one for the Near East Side, which is a combination of Olde Towne East and King-Lincoln. Like Weinland Park, the NES has seen its fair share of struggles over the years, but unlike Weinland Park, its revitalization has been decades in the making. It has seen steady house-to-house renovations since at least the 1980s, and is now at the point where the pace of larger scale redevelopment is picking up. There are currently at least a dozen infill projects in the works, with even more renovations.

North Ohio Avenue
Before: 2009 North Ohio Avenue looking north.

After: 2017

2017

These photos don’t represent all that big a change, but it shows some of the infrastructure improvements going on around the neighborhood. This picture is just south of the Poindexter Place development on North Ohio Avenue. The photos show the addition of a multi-use path, new sidewalks and pavement. Bike lanes, which aren’t shown in the Google image, were also striped.

Poindexter Village
Before: 2009 North Ohio and Hawthorne, looking east.

After: 2017

Poindexter Village was the first large-scale public housing complex in Columbus, built back in the 1940s. All but 2 of the original buildings were torn down to make room for a redevelopment, called Poindexter Place. The last 2 buildings will become a museum. The change from 2009 to 2017 is drastic.

Before: 2009 Champion and Mt. Vernon, looking southeast.

2009

After: 2017

Before: 2011 Hawthorne Avenue looking north.

After: 2017

Before: 2009 Oak and 18th looking northwest

After: 2017

An example of some of the businesses that have moved into the neighborhood.

Before: 2015 Bryden and Garfield, looking northwest.

After: 2017

This is an example of the most common type of development within the Near East Side- the small-scale renovation.

Before: 2009 Long and 17th, looking southeast.

After: 2017

These photos show a mix of private and public development.

August’s Missed (and Gained) Opportunities of the Month




Instead of focusing on a single project this month, I wanted to do a rundown of a few projects- this time both good and bad.

First, the bad.

High and Cherry Street Project
In what’s becoming a tradition for Downtown, yet another project there has been inexplicably downsized. Originally approved back in 2016, the project required the demolition of a historic building.

This was generally considered okay because the proposed 11-story project was a significant improvement in density that would’ve added more vibrancy to this part of Downtown.

The original proposal.


2 years later and, beyond the demolition, there had been no movement on the site, which was itself a little concerning because that typically means that something’s gone wrong or there are about to be big changes for the project. So it was no surprise when, toward the end of July, we received the bad news. Not only was the project going to be reduced in size by a full 4 stories, but all aspects of the project were getting worse. Parking spaces doubled, bike parking spaces were reduced by 70% to just 18, the ground floor retail was completely eliminated and overall residential units fell by 50 to just 70 total. Worse still, even the design of the building became just another bland box.

So what happened? Crawford-Hoying, the developer, made some reference to rising material costs that made its plan to include affordable, micro-unit apartments too expensive, hence the reduction in project size. However, this excuse seems suspicious at best. If higher material costs were a detriment to building the affordable component, why not simply lower the number of micro units or change to a market-rate project altogether? Furthermore, what would that have to do with eliminating the retail space or increasing parking? It wouldn’t. In fact, building parking is actually very expensive, and it’s why many cities nationally are reducing or eliminating parking requirements for new projects, as it is often prohibitively expensive to build and can derail quality urban proposals. If finances were tight, the last thing a developer would do with a new project is add MORE parking rather than trying to maximize potential income with residential units or retail space. Meanwhile, in the month since the project reduction was announced, we have seen other new projects announced or previously-announced projects move forward that have seen no reduction. The company also didn’t make any changes to its 10-story Moxy Hotel project at 800 N. High street, which is currently under construction. Overall, this just feels like a bait and switch. The 11-story proposal was approved, which allowed for the demolition, and now it’s coming in smaller and of a lower quality.
Regardless of the real reasons why this project was suburbanized and reduced, it continues the long-standing pattern of Downtown projects being underwhelming. Downtown should be receiving the the statement makers, so to speak. Instead, we continue to see other neighborhoods get them.

Speaking of, let’s look at the good with a couple of proposals that have matched, if not exceeded, their potential.

Upper Arlington’s Arlington Gateway
Proposed back in 2016 as a 7-story mixed-use building, the project has gone through many revisions. Over the course of the last 2 years, the project has only grown in size to its final iteration, an 11-story with more than 200 apartments, office space and retail. The $100 million project is the largest ever proposed for Upper Arlington, which has long been a more traditional suburban-style inner suburb. It has resisted the urban densification movement until recently. Being landlocked, the only way that it can increase population and maintain tax levels is to build up. Its city leadership seems to understand this, and though there was neighborhood opposition to the project, the city approved it almost unanimously.

The project will replace suburban development, including a strip center and Pizza Hut, as seen below.

Quality urbanism, increased walkability… this is a solid addition to Upper Arlington.

Franklinton’s Gravity 2.0
Franklinton is seeing a revival these days, particularly east of 315. Multiple projects have been proposed, and the upcoming Scioto Peninsula redevelopment is on the horizon. Kaufman Development, highlighted in last month’s Missed Opportunity for having to abandon a project in Victorian Village due to NIMBYism, has been on somewhat of a roll lately. It spearheaded a significant renovation of the famed LeVeque Tower, it built both of Downtown’s largest recent projects- 250 High and 80 on the Commons (the latter of which was, of course, downsized)- and it’s heavily investing in the future of Franklinton with a stunning, out-of-the-box development named Gravity.
Gravity 1.0 was proposed back in 2016 as a 6-story, mixed-use development at 500 W. Broad Street in Franklinton. Innovative in design, the project included amenities like a climbing wall, outdoor movie theater, yoga plaza, lots of public art, a dog park, biergarten and more.

Gravity 1.0



Replacing a few single-story, non-historic buildings and some parking lots (as seen above), the project was designed to drastically change the existing streetscape. It began construction in late 2016 and is nearing completion now. Few anticipated a second phase of the project, however, dubbed Gravity 2.0
Announced last week, Gravity 2.0 would be much more massive in scale than 1.0. Proposed for the entire block directly across the street between W. Broad and W. State, the project would include the following:
– A 12-story mixed-use building at the northeast corner of the site, directly to the west of the railroad tracks.
– A 6-story residential building on the Stat Street.
– A 5-story parking garage.
– A 6-story mixed-use addition to the existing Murphy building, which will be renovated.
– A 5-story townhouse building along McDowell Street.
– A renovation to the existing Solazzo Building at the southwest corner.
Like Gravity 1.0, the project will include different types of amenities than would be typically found. These include a green roof on the parking garage with a “city view overlook”, as well as an art walk through the lower floor of the garage. Along Broad Street, a retail plaza will be constructed out of shipping containers. Co-living will be included in the southern residential building. A food hall, brewery and restaurants are also potentially in the works. Overall, the architecture will match the funky modernism of Gravity 1.0.
There is no word yet on exactly how many residential units the entire site will include, or how much retail and office space. Those details should be released in the coming months.



This project is poised to become a serious game-changer for Franklinton. While there was already ongoing redevelopment in this area, a mid-rise development like this pushes the envelope and raises the prospects of future development coming in bigger, and the pace of the redevelopment will likely accelerate. This also increases the likelihood that the Scioto Peninsula to the east will see larger scale development, as well. Originally, the city wanted a couple 30+ story buildings there, with a mix of other mid-rise buildings. That plan was abandoned when an Indianapolis developer was chosen for the site and proposed mostly low-rise. That developer was let go from the project a few months ago, and the Peninsula will now be developed piece by piece. With large development occurring in Franklinton itself, the high-rises may be about to make a return, making the entire eastern section of Franklinton an extension of Downtown.

So there are a few great projects that are definitely NOT missed opportunities. Take note, Downtown developers- a lot of you are getting embarrassed.