2017 County/Metro Population Estimates Part 2




In part 2, I am going to examine metro areas, not only in Ohio, but also Columbus’ peer group that includes Midwest and national metro areas. Midwest peers (outside Ohio) used would be any metro with a population greater than 500,000. National peers would be metros that either started or ended the period 2010-2017 with a population between 1.5-2.5 Million.

As with counties, I am going to start this look with a comparison of overall population.

Total Metro Area Population Census 2010, July 1, 2016 and July 1, 2017

Census 2010——————————-July 1, 2016————————July 1, 2017
1. Chicago, IL: 9,461,104————-1. Chicago: 9,546,326———–1. Chicago: 9,533,040
2. Detroit, MI: 4,296,250—————2. Detroit: 4,305,869————-2. Detroit: 9,313,002
3. Minneapolis, MN: 3,348,8459—3. Minneapolis: 3,557,276–3. Minneapolis: 3,600,618
4. St. Louis, MO: 2,787,701———4. St. Louis: 2,806,782———4. St. Louis: 2,807,338
5. Pittsburgh, PA: 2,356,285——–5. Charlotte: 2,475,519———5. Charlotte: 2,525,305
6. Portland, OR: 2,226,009———-6. Orlando: 2,453,333———-6. Orlando: 2,509,831
7. Charlotte: 2,217,012———–7. San Antonio: 2,426,211—–7. San Antonio: 2,473,974
8. Sacramento, CA: 2,149,127—–8. Portland: 2,423,102——–8. Portland: 2,453,168
9. San Antonio, TX: 2,142,516—–9. Pittsburgh: 2,341,536——9. Pittsburgh: 2,333,367
10. Orlando, FL: 2,134,411—–10. Sacramento: 2,295,233—10. Sacramento: 2,324,884
11. Cincinnati: 2,114,580———-11. Cincinnati: 2,166,029—–11. Las Vegas: 2,204,079
12. Cleveland: 2,077,240————12. Las Vegas: 2,156,724—-12. Cincinnati: 2,179,082
13. Kansas City, MO: 2,009,342-13. Kansas City: 2,106,382-13. Kansas City: 2,128,912
14. Las Vegas, NV: 1,951,269——–14. Austin: 2,060,558——–14. Austin: 2,115,827
15. Columbus: 1,901,974———-15. Cleveland: 2,060,065——15. Columbus: 2,078,725
16. Indianapolis, IN: 1,887,877——16. Columbus: 2,046,977—16. Cleveland: 2,058,844
17. San Jose, CA: 1,836,911—17. Indianapolis: 2,005,612—17. Indianapolis: 2,028,614
18. Austin, TX: 1,716,289————18. San Jose: 1,990,910—-18. San Jose: 1,998,463
19. Virginia Beach, VA: 1,676,822—19. Nashville: 1,868,855—-19. Nashville: 1,903,045
20. Nashville: 1,670,890—20. Virginia Beach: 1,722,766–20. Virginia Beach: 1,725,246
21. Providence, RI: 1,600,852—-21. Providence: 1,615,878—21. Providence: 1,621,122
22. Milwaukee, WI: 1,555,908—–22. Milwaukee: 1,576,143—22. Milwaukee: 1,576,236
23. Jacksonville, FL: 1,345,596-23. Jacksonville: 1,476,503–23. Jacksonville: 1,504,980
24. Grand Rapids: 988,938–24. Grand Rapids: 1,048,826-24. Grand Rapids: 1,059,113
25. Omaha, NE: 865,350————–25. Omaha: 924,003—-25. Omaha: 933,316
26. Dayton: 799,232——————–26. Dayton: 800,886—–26. Dayton: 803,416
27. Akron: 703,200———————27. Akron: 702,556——–27. Akron: 703,505
28. Wichita, KS: 630,919————-28. Madison: 647,432—28. Madison: 654,230
29. Toledo: 610,001——————29. Wichita: 644,680——29. Des Moines: 645,911
30. Madison, WI: 605,435———–30. Des Moines: 634,740—-30. Wichita: 645,628
31. Des Moines, IA: 569,633——-31. Toledo: 604,591——31. Toledo: 603,668
32. Youngstown: 565,773——32. Youngstown: 544,543—32. Youngstown: 541,926
33. Canton: 404,422——————33. Canton: 401,165—-33. Canton: 399,927

Columbus passed up Cleveland to become Ohio’s 2nd largest metro.

Metro Area Total Growth Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017—————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

1. Austin, TX: +399,507———————————–1. Orlando: +56,498
2. Orlando, FL: +375,432———————————2. Austin: +55,269
3. San Antonio, TX: +331,458—————————3. Charlotte: +49,786
4. Charlotte, NC: +308,313——————————-4. San Antonio: +47,763
5. Las Vegas, NV: +252,810—————————–5. Las Vegas: +47,355
6. Minneapolis, MN: +251,760————————–6. Minneapolis: +43,342
7. Nashville, TN: +232,162——————————-7. Nashville: +34,190
8. Portland, OR: +227,167——————————-8. Columbus: +31,748
9. Columbus: +176,724———————————–9. Portland: +30,066
10. Sacramento, CA: +175,740————————10. Sacramento: +29,651
11. San Jose, CA: +161,523—————————-11. Jacksonville: +28,477
12. Jacksonville, FL: +159,382————————-12. Indianapolis: +23,002
13. Indianapolis, IN: +140,524————————-13. Kansas City: +22,530
14. Kansas City, MO: +119,574————————14. Cincinnati: +13,053
15. Des Moines, IA: +76,278—————————15. Des Moines: +11,171
16. Chicago, IL: +71,499——————————–16. Grand Rapids: +10,287
17. Grand Rapids, MI: +70,173————————17. Omaha: +9,313
18. Omaha, NE: +67,960——————————–18. San Jose: +7,533
19. Cincinnati: +64,396———————————–19. Detroit: +7,133
20. Madison, WI: +48,802——————————-20. Madison: +6,798
21. Virginia Beach, VA: +48,429———————-21. Providence: +5,244
22. Milwaukee, WI: +20,282—————————22. Dayton: +2,530
23. Providence, RI: +19,912————————–23. Virginia Beach: +2,480
24. St. Louis, MO: +19,575—————————24. Akron: +949
25. Detroit, MI: +16,685——————————-25. Wichita: +948
26. Wichita, KS: +14,704——————————26. St. Louis: +556
27. Dayton: +4,165————————————-27. Milwaukee: +93
28. Akron: +302—————————————–28. Toledo: -923
29. Canton: -4,501————————————-29. Cleveland: -1,221
30. Toledo: -6,334————————————-30. Canton: -1,238
31. Cleveland: -18,427——————————-31. Youngstown: -2,617
32. Pittsburgh, PA: -22,924————————-32. Pittsburgh: -8,169
33. Youngstown: -23,873—————————-33. Chicago: -13,286

Now, as done with counties, let’s look at the components of population change for metro areas.

Total Births By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Chicago: +869,178—————————————-1. Chicago: +115,915
2. Detroit: +364,121———————————————-2. Detroit: +49,940
3. Minneapolis: +331,430————————————–3. Minneapolis: +45,810
4. St. Louis: +246,280——————————————4. San Antonio: +34,318
5. San Antonio: +236,348————————————–5. St. Louis: +33,143
6. Charlotte: +217,525——————————————6. Charlotte: +31,315
7. Portland: +201,872——————————————-7. Orlando: +29,173
8. Orlando: +200,843——————————————-8. Portland: +28,220
9. Kansas City: +200,535————————————–9. Columbus: +27,663
10. Sacramento: +198,466————————————10. Kansas City: +27,565
11. Columbus: +197,185—————————————11. Las Vegas: +27,449
12. Cincinnati: +196,146—————————————12. Austin: +27,400
13. Las Vegas: +194,083————————————–13. Sacramento: +27,148
14. Indianapolis: +193,599————————————14. Cincinnati: +26,855
15. Austin: +188,961——————————————–15. Indianapolis: +26,769
16. San Jose: +176,224—————————————-16. Nashville: +24,690
17. Pittsburgh: +173,472—————————————17. San Jose: +23,826
18. Nashville: +170,824—————————————–18. Pittsburgh: +23,614
19. Cleveland: +168,361—————————————19. Cleveland: +22,873
20. Virginia Beach: +163,787———————————20. Milwaukee: +19,474
21. Milwaukee: +144,429————————————–21. Jacksonville: +18,748
22. Jacksonville: +130,339————————————22. Providence: +16,542
23. Providence: +120,526————————————-23. Grand Rapids: +13,548
24. Grand Rapids: +98,214———————————–24. Omaha: +13,421
25. Omaha: +96,558——————————————-25. Dayton: +9,615
26. Dayton: +69,855——————————————-26. Des Moines: +9,172
27. Wichita: +65,873——————————————27. Wichita: +8,694
28. Des Moines: +63,958————————————28. Madison: +7,400
29. Akron: +54,644——————————————–29. Toledo: +7,345
30. Toledo: +54,309——————————————-30. Akron: +7,342
31. Madison: +53,718—————————————-31. Virginia Beach: +5,935
32. Youngstown: +40,696———————————–32. Youngstown: +5,551
33. Canton: +32,199——————————————33. Canton: +4,434

Total Deaths By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Chicago: -501,469—————————————1. Chicago: -72,491
2. Detroit: -293,091—————————————–2. Detroit: -41,075
3. Pittsburgh: -197,572————————————3. Pittsburgh: -27,439
4. St. Louis: -186,111————————————–4. St. Louis: -26,755
5. Minneapolis: -161,913———————————5. Minneapolis: -23,527
6. Cleveland: -153,138———————————–6. Cleveland: -21,068
7. Cincinnati: -135,975———————————–7. Cincinnati: -19,515
8. Charlotte: -127,523————————————-8. Charlotte: -19,009
9. Portland: -120,590————————————–9. Orlando: -18,268
10. Sacramento: -120,429——————————10. Sacramento: -18,081
11. Kansas City: -119,748——————————11. Portland: -17,875
12. Orlando: -117,771———————————–12. San Antonio: -17,679
13. San Antonio: -117,289——————————13. Kansas City: -17,106
14. Indianapolis: -113,742——————————14. Las Vegas: -16,867
15. Columbus: -108,704——————————–15. Indianapolis: -16,081
16. Las Vegas: -108,003——————————–16. Columbus: -15,833
17. Providence: -107,920——————————-17. Providence: -15,031
18. Nashville: -99,415———————————–18. Nashville: -14,723
19. Virginia Beach: -97,935—————————-19. Milwaukee: -13,399
20. Milwaukee: -95,601———————————20. Jacksonville: -13,288
21. Jacksonville: -86,920——————————-21. San Jose: -11,360
22. San Jose: -73,507———————————–22. Austin: -10,609
23. Austin: -67,704—————————————23. Dayton: -8,359
24. Dayton: -59,736————————————-24. Grand Rapids: -7,674
25. Grand Rapids: -53,725—————————-25. Akron: -7,138
26. Akron: -50,948—————————————26. Youngstown: -6,821
27. Youngstown: -50,302——————————27. Omaha: -6,667
28. Omaha: -47,763————————————-28. Toledo: -5,968
29. Toledo: -42,313————————————-29. Wichita: -5,686
30. Wichita: -40,647————————————30. Des Moines: -4,631
31. Canton: -31,722————————————31. Canton: -4,366
32. Des Moines: -31,563——————————32. Madison: -4,252
33. Madison: -30,385———————————-33. Virginia Beach: -3,280

Total Net Natural Change (Births vs. Deaths) By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Chicago: +367,709—————————————1. Chicago: +43,424
2. Minneapolis: +169,517———————————–2. Minneapolis: +22,283
3. Austin: +121,257——————————————3. Austin: +16,791
4. San Antonio: +119,059———————————-4. San Antonio: +16,639
5. San Jose: +102,717————————————–5. San Jose: +12,466
6. Charlotte: +90,002—————————————-6. Charlotte: +12,306
7. Columbus: +88,481————————————–7. Columbus: +11,830
8. Las Vegas: +86,080————————————-8. Orlando: +10,905
9. Orlando: +83,072—————————————-9. Indianapolis: +10,688
10. Portland: +81,282————————————-10. Las Vegas: +10,582
11. Kansas City: +80,787———————————11. Kansas City: +10,459
12. Indianapolis: +79,857——————————–12. Portland: +10,345
13. Sacramento: +78,037——————————–13. Nashville: +9,967
14. Nashville: +71,409————————————14. Sacramento: +9,067
15. Detroit: +71,030—————————————15. Detroit: +8,865
16. Virginia Beach: +65,852—————————–16. Virginia Beach: +7,762
17. Cincinnati: +60,171———————————–17. Cincinnati: +7,340
18. St. Louis: +60,169————————————-18. Omaha: +6,754
19. Milwaukee: +48,828———————————-19. St. Louis: +6,388
20. Omaha: +48,795————————————–20. Grand Rapids: +5,874
21. Grand Rapids: +44,489—————————–21. Jacksonville: +5,460
22. Jacksonville: +43,419——————————-22. Des Moines: +4,541
23. Des Moines: +32,395——————————-23. Madison: +3,148
24. Wichita: +25,226————————————-24. Milwaukee: +6,075
25. Madison: +23,333———————————–25. Wichita: +3,008
26. Cleveland: +15,223——————————–26. Cleveland: +1,805
27. Providence: +12,606——————————27. Providence: +1,511
28. Toledo: +11,996———————————–28. Toledo: +1,377
29. Dayton: +10,119———————————-29. Dayton: +1,256
30. Akron: +3,696————————————–30. Akron: +204
31. Canton: +477—————————————31. Canton: +68
32. Youngstown: -9,606——————————-32. Youngstown: -1,270
33. Pittsburgh: -24,100——————————–33. Pittsburgh: -3,825

Total Domestic Migration By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Austin: +224,351—————————————–1. Charlotte: +31,102
2. Charlotte: +177,484————————————-2. Austin: +30,120
3. San Antonio: +169,684——————————–3. Las Vegas: +29,414
4. Orlando: +155,498————————————–4. San Antonio: +24,891
5. Nashville: +126,142————————————-5. Orlando: +23,321
6. Las Vegas: +119,742———————————-6. Jacksonville: +18,921
7. Portland: +106,839————————————-7. Nashville: +18,708
8. Jacksonville: +87,040———————————8. Portland: +13,384
9. Sacramento: +49,262———————————9. Sacramento: +12,888
10. Columbus: +42,932———————————10. Columbus: +12,562
11. Des Moines: +32,042——————————-11. Kansas City: +8,531
12. Indianapolis: +30,772——————————-12. Minneapolis: +8,095
13. Kansas City: +16,802——————————-13. Indianapolis: +7,763
14. Madison: +13,224————————————14. Des Moines: +4,812
15. Grand Rapids: +12,355—————————-15. Grand Rapids: +2,217
16. Omaha: +5,265—————————————16. Madison: +1,706
17. Minneapolis: +432———————————–17. Cincinnati: +1,541
18. Canton: -5,797—————————————-18. Omaha: +383
19. Akron: -13,427—————————————-19. Dayton: -346
20. Youngstown: -16,228——————————-20. Akron: -877
21. Dayton: -16,864————————————–21. Canton: -1,469
22. Wichita: -18,452————————————–22. Youngstown: -1,711
23. Cincinnati: -21,259———————————-23. Providence: -2,588
24. Toledo: -23,102————————————–24. Toledo: -3,070
25. Pittsburgh: -24,397———————————25. Wichita: -3,235
26. Providence: -33,335——————————-26. Virginia Beach: -4,706
27. Milwaukee: -50,575——————————–27. Cleveland: -8,008
28. Virginia Beach: -51,916—————————28. Pittsburgh: -8,633
29. Cleveland: -64,353——————————–29. Milwaukee: -9,635
30. St. Louis: -67,560———————————30. St. Louis: -8,828
31. San Jose: -73,026——————————–31. Detroit: -14,863
32. Detroit: -141,006———————————-32. San Jose: -25,729
33. Chicago: -479,482——————————–33. Chicago: -85,177

Total International Migration By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Chicago: +183,162—————————————1. Chicago: +28,302
2. Orlando: +135,860—————————————2. Orlando: +22,207
3. San Jose: +132,938————————————-3. San Jose: +20,747
4. Detroit: +86,366——————————————4. Detroit: +13,214
5. Minneapolis: +83,552———————————-5. Minneapolis: +13,107
6. Sacramento: +49,560———————————-6. Austin: +8,185
7. Austin: +49,311——————————————7. Sacramento: +7,722
8. Las Vegas: +46,411————————————8. Columbus: +7,350
9. Columbus: +45,744————————————9. Las Vegas: +7,221
10. Providence: +41,325——————————–10. Providence: +6,381
11. San Antonio: +40,953——————————-11. Portland: +6,335
12. Charlotte: +39,380———————————–12. Charlotte: +6,279
13. Portland: +38,542————————————13. San Antonio: +6,173
14. Virginia Beach: +34,619—————————-14. Nashville: +5,510
15. Nashville: +33,169———————————–15. Cleveland: +5,045
16. Cleveland: +31,236———————————-16. Indianapolis: +4,603
17. Indianapolis: +30,329——————————-17. Pittsburgh: +4,359
18. Jacksonville: +28,593——————————-18. Cincinnati: +4,285
19. St. Louis: +27,666————————————19. Jacksonville: +4,043
20. Pittsburgh: +27,300———————————20. St. Louis: +4,032
21. Cincinnati: +26,502———————————21. Milwaukee: +3,689
22. Kansas City: +23,098——————————22. Kansas City: +3,572
23. Milwaukee: +22,616——————————–23. Grand Rapids: +2,233
24. Omaha: +14,383————————————24. Omaha: +2,213
25. Grand Rapids: +13,800—————————25. Madison: +1,949
26. Madison: +12,367———————————-26. Des Moines: +1,807
27. Des Moines: +11,592—————————–27. Dayton: +1,654
28. Dayton: +11,230———————————–28. Akron: +1,647
29. Akron: +10,413————————————-29. Wichita: +1,187
30. Wichita: +8,117————————————-30. Virginia Beach: +1,077
31. Toledo: +4,627————————————-31. Toledo: +769
32. Youngstown: +2,171——————————32. Youngstown: +381
33. Canton: +1,118————————————33. Canton: +174

Total Net Migration By Metro Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017———————————July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Orlando: +291,358————————————–1. Orlando: +45,528
2. Austin: +273,662—————————————-2. Austin: +38,305
3. Charlotte: +216,864————————————3. Charlotte: +37,381
4. San Antonio: +210,637——————————–4. Las Vegas: +36,635
5. Las Vegas: +166,153———————————-5. San Antonio: +31,064
6. Nashville: +159,311————————————6. Nashville: +24,218
7. Portland: +145,381————————————7. Jacksonville: +22,964
8. Jacksonville: +115,633——————————-8. Minneapolis: +21,202
9. Sacramento: +98,822——————————–9. Sacramento: +20,610
10. Columbus: +88,676——————————–10. Columbus: +19,912
11. Minneapolis: +83,984——————————11. Portland: +19,719
12. Indianapolis: +61,101——————————12. Indianapolis: +12,366
13. San Jose: +59,912———————————-13. Kansas City: +12,103
14. Des Moines: +43,634——————————14. Des Moines: +6,619
15. Kansas City: +39,900——————————15. Cincinnati: +5,826
16. Grand Rapids: +26,155—————————16. Grand Rapids: +4,450
17. Madison: +25,591———————————-17. Providence: +3,793
18. Omaha: +19,648————————————18. Madison: +3,655
19. Providence: +7,990———————————19. Omaha: +2,596
20. Cincinnati: +5,243———————————-20. Dayton: +1,308
21. Pittsburgh: +2,903———————————-21. Akron: +770
22. Akron: -3,014—————————————-22. Canton: -1,295
23. Canton: -4,679————————————–23. Youngstown: -1,330
24. Dayton: -5,634————————————–24. Detroit: -1,649
25. Wichita: -10,335————————————25. Wichita: -2,048
26. Youngstown: -14,057—————————–26. Toledo: -2,301
27. Virginia Beach: -17,297————————–27. Cleveland: -2,963
28. Toledo: -18,475————————————28. Virginia Beach: -3,629
29. Milwaukee: -27,959——————————29. Pittsburgh: -4,274
30. Cleveland: -33,117——————————-30. San Jose: -4,982
31. St. Louis: -39,894———————————31. St. Louis: -5,796
32. Detroit: -54,640————————————32. Milwaukee: -5,946
33. Chicago: -296,320——————————-33. Chicago: -56,875




2017 Ohio County/Metro Population Estimates Part 1




Early this morning, the Census released the most recent population figures for counties, Metropolitan Statistical Areas and Consolidated Statistical Areas. The estimates cover the year from July 1, 2016 to July 1, 2017. For Part 1, we are going to take a look at counties.

Here are Ohio’s 88 counties and their population Census 2010, July 1, 2016 and July 1, 2017. The counties highlighted by color are as follows:
Akron Metro Counties
Canton  Metro Counties
Cincinnati Metro Counties (Ohio Only)
Cleveland Metro Counties
Columbus Metro Counties
Dayton Metro Counties
Toledo Metro Counties
Youngstown Metro Counties
Black are non-metro counties.

Census 2010——————————July 1, 2016————————-July 1, 2017
1. Cuyahoga: 1,280,122———–1. Franklin: 1,269,998———–1. Franklin: 1,291,981
2. Franklin: 1,163,414————2. Cuyahoga: 1,253,454——–2. Cuyahoga: 1,248,514
3. Hamilton: 802,374 ————–3. Hamilton: 810,087————-3. Hamilton: 813,822
4. Summit: 541,781—————-4. Summit: 540,394—————4. Summit: 541,228
5. Montgomery: 535,153——5. Montgomery: 531,395——–5. Montgomery: 530,604
6. Lucas: 441,815——————6. Lucas: 432,562—————–6. Lucas 430,887
7. Stark: 375,586——————-7. Butler: 377,933——————7. Butler: 380,604
8. Butler: 368,130——————8. Stark: 373,528——————8. Stark: 372,542
9. Lorain: 301,356—————–9. Lorain: 306,590——————9. Lorain: 307,924
10. Mahoning: 238,823———10. Mahoning: 230,169————10. Lake: 230,117
11. Lake: 230,041—————–11. Lake: 229,270——————11. Mahoning: 229,796
12. Warren: 212,693————-12. Warren: 226,476—————12. Warren: 228,882
13. Trumbull: 210,312———–13. Clermont: 203,016————13. Clermont: 204,214
14. Clermont: 197,363———–14. Trumbull: 201,701————-14. Delaware: 200,464
15. Delaware: 174,214———–15. Delaware: 196,777————15. Trumbull: 200,380
16. Medina: 172,332————-16. Medina: 176,903—————16. Medina: 178,371
17. Licking: 166,492————–17. Licking: 171,822—————17. Licking: 173,448
18. Greene: 161,573————–18. Greene: 165,109—————-18. Greene: 166,752
19. Portage: 161,419————-19. Portage: 162,162—————19. Portage: 162,277
20. Fairfield: 146,156————20. Fairfield: 152,681—————-20. Fairfield: 154,733
21. Clark: 138,333—————–21. Clark: 134,621——————–21. Clark: 134,557
22. Wood: 125,488—————22. Wood: 129,704——————-22. Wood: 130,492
23. Richland: 124,475————23. Richland: 121,167—————-23. Richland: 120,589
24. Wayne: 114,520————–24. Wayne: 116,422——————24. Wayne: 116,038
25. Columbiana: 107,841——-25. Miami: 104,382——————–25. Miami: 105,122
26. Allen: 106,331—————-26. Columbiana: 103,744————26. Allen: 103,198
27. Miami: 102,506————–27. Allen: 103,626——————27. Columbiana: 103,077
28. Ashtabula: 101,497———28. Ashtabula: 98,169————–28. Ashtabula: 97,807
29. Geauga: 93,389————-29. Geauga: 93,848—————–29. Geauga: 93,918
30. Tuscarawas: 92,582——–30. Tuscarawas: 92,485————30. Tuscarawas: 92,297
31. Muskingum: 86,074———31. Muskingum: 85,929————-31. Muskingum: 86,149
32. Scioto: 79,499—————-32. Ross: 76,910———————32. Ross: 77,313
33. Ross: 78,064—————–33. Scioto: 76,240——————–33. Scioto: 75,929
34. Erie: 77,079——————34. Hancock: 75,590—————–34. Hancock: 75,754
35. Hancock: 74,782————35. Erie: 74,944———————–35. Erie: 74,817
36. Belmont: 70,400————-36. Belmont: 68,568—————–36. Belmont: 68,029
37. Jefferson: 69,709————37. Jefferson: 66,914—————37. Athens: 66,597
38. Marion: 66,501—————38. Athens: 66,320——————38. Jefferson: 66,359
39. Athens: 64,757—————39. Marion: 65,334——————39. Marion: 64,967
40. Lawrence: 62,450———–40. Knox: 60,832———————40. Knox: 61,261
41. Washington: 61,778———41. Lawrence: 60,729————–41. Washington: 60,418
42. Sandusky: 60,944————42. Washington: 60,535———–42. Lawrence: 60,249
43. Knox: 60,921——————43. Sandusky: 59,281————–43. Sandusky: 59,195
44. Huron: 59,626—————–44. Huron: 58,391——————-44. Huron: 58,494
45. Seneca: 56,745—————45. Pickaway: 57,530—————45. Pickaway: 57,830
46. Pickaway: 55,698————-46. Union: 55,456——————-46. Union: 56,741
47. Ashland: 53,139—————47. Seneca: 55,357—————–47. Seneca: 55,243
48. Darke: 53,139—————–48. Ashland: 53,417—————–48. Ashland: 53,628
49. Union: 52,300——————49. Darke: 51,636——————-49. Darke: 51,536
50. Shelby: 49,423—————–50. Shelby: 48,726—————–50. Shelby: 48,759
51. Auglaize: 45,949————–51. Auglaize: 45,797—————-51. Auglaize: 45,778
52. Logan: 45,858—————–52. Logan: 45,171——————-52. Logan: 45,325
53. Brown: 44,846—————–53. Holmes: 43,832—————–53. Madison: 44,036
54. Crawford: 43,784————-54. Brown: 43,644——————-54. Holmes: 43,957
55. Highland: 43,589————-55. Madison: 43,354—————–55. Brown: 43,576
56. Madison: 43,435————-56. Highland: 42,993—————–56. Highland: 42,971
57. Fulton: 42,698—————-57. Fulton: 42,325——————–57. Fulton: 42,289
58. Holmes: 42,366————–58. Crawford: 42,037—————–58. Clinton: 42,009
59. Preble: 42,270—————-59. Clinton: 41,881——————-59. Crawford: 41,746
60. Clinton: 42,040—————60. Preble: 41,105——————–60. Preble: 41,120
61. Ottawa: 41,428—————61. Mercer: 40,710——————-61. Mercer: 40,873
62. Mercer: 40,814—————62. Ottawa: 40,495——————-62. Ottawa: 40,657
63. Champaign: 40,097———63. Guernsey: 39,200—————63. Guernsey: 39,093
64. Guernsey: 40,087———–64. Champaign: 38,737————-64. Champaign: 38,840
65. Defiance: 39,037————65. Defiance: 38,121—————–65. Defiance: 38,156
66. Williams: 37,642————66. Williams: 36,921——————66. Williams: 36,784
67. Coshocton: 36,901———-67. Coshocton: 36,644————-67. Coshocton: 36,544
68. Perry: 36,058—————–68. Perry: 36,019——————–68. Perry: 36,024
69. Morrow: 34,827————–69. Morrow: 34,827——————69. Morrow: 34,994
70. Putnam: 34,499————–70. Putnam: 34,016—————–70. Putnam: 33,878
71. Jackson: 33,225————-71. Jackson: 32,534—————–71. Jackson: 32,449
72. Hardin: 32,058—————72. Hardin: 31,407——————-72. Hardin: 31,364
73. Gallia: 30,934—————-73. Gallia: 29,996———————73. Gallia: 29,973
74. Hocking: 29,380————-74. Fayette: 28,662——————74. Fayette: 28,752
75. Fayette: 29,030————–75. Hocking: 28,386—————–75. Hocking: 28,474
76. Carroll: 28,836—————76. Pike: 28,237———————–76. Pike: 28,270
77. Van Wert: 28,744————77. Van Wert: 28,166—————-77. Van Wert: 28,217
78. Pike: 28,709——————-78. Adams: 27,832——————-78. Adams: 27,726
79. Adams: 28,550—————79. Carroll: 27,637——————–79. Carroll: 27,385
80. Henry: 28,215—————-80. Henry: 27,269———————80. Henry: 27,185
81. Meigs: 23,770—————-81. Meigs: 23,177———————81. Meigs: 23,080
82. Wyandot: 22,615————-82. Wyandot: 22,042—————-82. Wyandot: 22,029
83. Paulding: 19,614————83. Paulding: 18,839——————83. Paulding: 18,845
84. Harrison: 15,864————-84. Harrison: 15,257——————84. Harrison: 15,216
85. Morgan: 15,054————–85. Morgan: 14,762——————-85. Morgan: 14,709
86. Noble: 14,645—————–86. Noble: 14,443———————86. Noble: 14,406
87. Monroe: 14,642————–87. Monroe: 14,097——————–87. Monroe: 13,946
88. Vinton: 13,435—————-88. Vinton: 13,021———————88. Vinton: 13,092

Columbus’ counties tended to move up in the rankings 2010-2017.




Let’s now take a look at total growth for the periods July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017 and Census 2010 to July 1, 2017.

Census 2010-July 1, 2017————————-July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +128,452—————————–1. Franklin: +21,983
2. Delaware: +26,275—————————–2. Hamilton: +3,735
3. Warren: +16,049——————————–3. Delaware: +3,687
4. Butler: +12,474———————————-4. Butler: +2,671
5. Hamilton: +11,435——————————5. Warren: +2,406
6. Fairfield: +8,556——————————–6. Fairfield: +2,052
7. Licking: +6,956———————————7. Greene: +1,643
8. Clermont: +6,862——————————-8. Licking: +1,626
9. Lorain: +6,555———————————–9. Medina: +1,468
10. Medina: +6,038——————————-10. Lorain: +1,334
11. Greene: +5,178——————————-11. Union: +1,285
12. Wood: +5,003———————————12. Clermont: +1,198
13. Union: +4,482———————————13. Lake: +847
14. Miami: +2,621———————————14. Summit: +834
15. Pickaway: +2,152—————————–15. Wood: +788
16. Athens: +1,833——————————–16. Miami: +740
17. Holmes: +1,593——————————–17. Madison: +682
18. Wayne: +1,522———————————18. Knox: +429
19. Hancock: +965———————————19. Ross: +403
20. Portage: +856———————————-20. Pickaway: +300
21. Madison: +598———————————21. Athens: +277
22. Geauga: +508———————————-22. Muskingum: +220
23. Ashland: +489———————————23. Ashland: +211
24. Knox: +331————————————-24. Hancock: +164
25. Morrow: +167———————————25. Mercer: +163
26. Lake: +67————————————–26. Ottawa: +162
27. Muskingum: +63—————————–27. Logan: +154
28. Mercer: +59———————————-28. Montgomery: +147
29. Perry: -15————————————-29. Clinton: +128
30. Clinton: -28———————————–30. Holmes: +125
31. Auglaize: -171——————————-31. Portage: +115
32. Noble: -239———————————–32. Champaign: +103
33. Fayette: -273——————————–33. Huron: +103
34. Tuscarawas: -285————————–34. Fayette: +90
35. Vinton: -338———————————35. Hocking: +88
36. Morgan: -347——————————-36. Vinton: +71
37. Coshocton: -354—————————37. Geauga: +70
38. Fulton: -409———————————38. Van Wert: +51
39. Pike: -432———————————–39. Morrow: +40
40. Van Wert: -526—————————-40. Defiance: +35
41. Logan: -529———————————41. Pike: +33
42. Summit: -554——————————-42. Shelby: +33
43. Wyandot: -586——————————43. Preble: +15
44. Putnam: -618——————————-44. Paulding: +6
45. Highland: -629—————————–45. Perry: +5
46. Harrison: -646——————————46. Wyandot: -13
47. Shelby: -659——————————–47. Auglaize: -19
48. Meigs: -687———————————48. Highland: -22
49. Hardin: -696——————————–49. Gallia: -23
50. Monroe: -696——————————-50. Fulton: -36
51. Ross: -752———————————-51. Noble: -37
52. Paulding: -770——————————52. Harrison: -41
53. Jackson: -777——————————53. Hardin: -43
54. Ottawa: -777——————————-54. Morgan: -53
55. Adams: -826——————————-55. Clark: -64
56. Williams: -864—————————–56. Brown: -68
57. Defiance: -875—————————-57. Henry: -84
58. Hocking: -899—————————–58. Jackson: -85
59. Gallia: -973——————————–59. Sandusky: -86
60. Guernsey: -998————————–60. Meigs: -97
61. Henry: -1,030—————————–61. Coshocton: -100
62. Huron: -1,131—————————–62. Darke: -100
63. Preble: -1,139—————————-63. Adams: -106
64. Champaign: -1,253———————64. Guernsey: -107
65. Brown: -1,267—————————-65. Seneca: -114
66. Washington: -1,360———————66. Washington: -117
67. Darke: -1,433—————————-67. Erie: -127
68. Carroll: -1,451—————————68. Williams: -137
69. Seneca: -1,499————————-69. Putnam: -138
70. Marion: -1,534————————–70. Monroe: -151
71. Sandusky: -1,751———————-71. Tuscarawas: -188
72. Crawford: -2,039———————–72. Carroll: -252
73. Lawrence: -2,199———————-73. Crawford: -291
74. Erie: -2,249—————————–74. Scioto: -311
75. Belmont: -2,373————————75. Ashtabula: -362
76. Stark: -3,050—————————-76. Marion: -367
77. Allen: -3,128—————————-77. Mahoning: -373
78. Jefferson: -3,350———————-78. Wayne: -384
79. Scioto: -3,568————————–79. Allen: -428
80. Montgomery: -3,634——————80. Lawrence: -480
81. Ashtabula: -3,681———————81. Belmont: -539
82. Clark: -3,790—————————82. Jefferson: -555
83. Richland: -3,887———————-83. Richland: -578
84. Columbiana: -4,764——————84. Columbiana: -667
85. Mahoning: -9,011———————85. Stark: -986
86. Trumbull: -9,938———————-86. Trumbull: -1,321
87. Lucas: -10,928————————87. Lucas: -1,675
88. Cuyahoga: -31,595——————88. Cuyahoga: -4,940

Finally, let’s examine the components of population change, but top 15 only.

Top 15 Counties with the Most Births Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +134,9580———————————–1. Franklin: +19,039
2. Cuyahoga: +107,949———————————-2. Cuyahoga: +14,637
3. Hamilton: +79,087————————————-3. Hamilton: +10,787
4. Montgomery: +48,275——————————–4. Montgomery: +6,576
5. Summit: +44,151—————————————5. Summit: +5,945
6. Lucas: +40,874—————————————–6. Lucas: +5,494
7. Butler: +32,888—————————————–7. Butler: +4,531
8. Stark: +30,188——————————————8. Stark: +4,163
9. Lorain: +24,497—————————————-9. Lorain: +3,329
10. Warren: +17,492————————————-10. Mahoning: +2,382
11. Mahoning: +17,312———————————11. Warren: +2,376
12. Clermont: +16,980———————————-12. Clermont: +2,307
13. Lake: +16,465—————————————–13. Lake: +2,244
14. Delaware: +15,662———————————-14. Delaware: +2,146
15. Trumbull: +15,153———————————–15. Trumbull: +2,059

Top 15 Counties with the Fewest Births Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Noble: +1,020——————————————-1. Noble: +131
2. Morgan: +1,050—————————————–2. Monroe: +135
3. Vinton: +1,051——————————————-3. Morgan: +139
4. Monroe: +1,083—————————————–4. Vinton: +144
5. Harrison: +1,150—————————————-5. Harrison: +149
6. Paulding: +1,595—————————————-6. Paulding: +213
7. Meigs: +1,762——————————————-7. Meigs: +228
8. Wyandot: +1,849—————————————8. Wyandot: +240
9. Carroll: +2,011—————————————–9. Carroll: +271
10. Hocking: +2,282————————————-10. Henry: +291
11. Henry: +2,295—————————————–11. Hocking: +309
12. Van Wert: +2,373————————————-12. Adams: +322
13. Adams: +2,431—————————————-13. Pike: +328
14. Ottawa: +2,489—————————————-14. Van Wert: +328
15. Pike: +2,504——————————————–15. Ottawa: +334

Top 15 Counties with the Most Deaths Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Cuyahoga: -98,692———————————–1. Cuyahoga: -13,439
2. Franklin: -65,458————————————–2. Franklin: -9,542
3. Hamilton: -56,157————————————-3. Hamilton: -7,768
4. Montgomery: -42,353——————————-4. Montgomery: -5,883
5. Summit: -40,895————————————–5. Summit: -5,735
6. Lucas: -31,778—————————————-6. Lucas: -4,465
7. Stark: -29.531—————————————–7. Stark: -4,077
8. Butler: -22,747—————————————-8. Butler: -3,347
9. Mahoning: -22,021———————————–9. Lorain: -2,947
10. Lorain: -21,265————————————-10. Mahoning: -2,920
11. Trumbull: -18,189———————————-11. Trumbull: -2,459
12. Lake: -17,265—————————————-12. Lake: -2,444
13. Clark: -12,267—————————————-13. Warren: -1,785
14. Clermont: -11,924———————————-14. Clermont: -1,706
15. Warren: -11,411————————————-15. Clark: -1,680

Top 15 Counties with the Fewest Deaths Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Noble: -916————————————————1. Noble: -131
2. Vinton: -1,025———————————————2. Vinton: -147
3. Morgan: -1,215——————————————-3. Morgan: -152
4. Monroe: -1,260——————————————-4. Harrison: -186
5. Paulding: -1,405—————————————–5. Paulding: -186
6. Harrison: -1,449——————————————6. Monroe: -189
7. Wyandot: -1,756—————————————–7. Wyandot: -246
8. Meigs: -2,004———————————————8. Henry: -249
9. Henry: -2,007———————————————9. Carroll: -289
10. Hocking: -2,131—————————————10. Meigs: -290
11. Putnam: -2,153—————————————–11. Hocking: -294
12. Carroll: -2,191—————————————–12. Putnam: -303
13. Holmes: -2,191—————————————–13. Van Wert: -306
14. Van Wert: -2,275—————————————14. Morrow: -308
15. Hardin: -2,284——————————————-15. Fayette: -318

Top 15 Counties with the Highest Natural Increase (Births vs. Deaths) Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +69,500————————————-1. Franklin: +9,497
2. Hamilton: +22,930————————————2. Hamilton: +3,019
3. Butler: +10,141—————————————-3. Cuyahoga: +1,198
4. Cuyahoga: +9,257————————————4. Butler: +1,184
5. Lucas: +9,096——————————————5. Lucas: +1,029
6. Delaware: +8,339————————————-6. Delaware: +1,013
7. Warren: +6,081—————————————-7. Montgomery: +693
8. Montgomery: +5,922——————————–8. Clermont: +601
9. Clermont: +5,056————————————-9. Warren: +591
10. Holmes: +3,410————————————–10. Holmes: +445
11. Fairfield: +3,380————————————-11. Guernsey: +414
12. Wayne: +3,313—————————————12. Licking: +408
13. Summit: +3,256————————————-13. Wayne: +406
14. Lorain: +3,232—————————————14. Lorain: +382
15. Licking: +3,173————————————–15. Fairfield: +378

Top 15 Counties with the Lowest Natural Increase (Births vs. Deaths) Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Mahoning: -4,709—————————————1. Mahoning: -538
2. Trumbull: -3,036—————————————-2. Trumbull: -400
3. Jefferson: -2,097—————————————–3. Jefferson: -276
4. Belmont: -1,370——————————————4. Lake: -200
5. Erie: -990————————————————–5. Belmont: -197
6. Ottawa: -977———————————————-6. Ottawa: -171
7. Columbiana: -891—————————————7. Washington: -134
8. Washington: -829—————————————8. Erie: -132
9. Lake: -800———————————————–9. Columbiana: -130
10. Clark: -694———————————————10. Clark: -119
11. Scioto: -493——————————————–11. Scioto: -68
12. Crawford: -363—————————————-12.  Lawrence: -67
13. Ashtabula: -354—————————————13. Meigs: -62
14. Harrison: -299—————————————–14. Monroe: -54
15. Lawrence: -285—————————————15. Harrison: -37

Top 15 Counties with the Most Domestic Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +18,270———————————-1. Franklin: +5,861
2. Delaware: +15,671———————————2. Delaware: +2,346
3. Warren: +6,996————————————-3. Fairfield: +1,491
4. Fairfield: +4,106————————————4. Warren: +1,332
5. Licking: +3,332————————————-5. Licking: +1,137
6. Medina: +2,900————————————-6. Medina: +1,058
7. Union: +1,953—————————————7. Union: +871
8. Pickaway: +1,489———————————-8. Greene: +763
9. Wood: +1,447—————————————9. Lake: +748
10. Clermont: +1,372——————————–10. Butler: +668
11. Miami: +1,293————————————-11. Madison: +639
12. Ottawa: +224————————————–12. Miami: +547
13. Madison: +177————————————13. Clermont: +515
14. Morgan: -186————————————–14. Ross: +379
15. Lorain: -271—————————————-15. Ottawa: +337

Top 15 Counties with the Least Domestic Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Cuyahoga: -65,672————————————-1. Cuyahoga: -10,087
2. Hamilton: -25,292—————————————2. Lucas: -3,249
3. Lucas: -23,401——————————————-3. Montgomery: -1,656
4. Montgomery: -16,752———————————-4. Hamilton: -1,533
5. Summit: -10,630—————————————–5. Stark: -1,232
6. Trumbull: -6,852—————————————–6. Trumbull: -923
7. Mahoning: -6,113—————————————7. Wayne: -897
8. Allen: -4,673———————————————–8. Allen: -618
9. Stark: -4,510———————————————-9. Richland: -613
10. Richland: -4,240—————————————-10. Columbiana: -528
11. Columbiana: -3,802————————————11. Portage: -425
12. Ashtabula: -3,779—————————————12. Ashtabula: -412
13. Scioto: -3,267——————————————–13. Lawrence: -392
14. Clark: -3,198———————————————14. Marion: -389
15. Portage: -2,797—————————————–15. Tuscarawas: -382

Top 15 Counties with the Most International Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +40,914—————————————1. Franklin: +6,584
2. Cuyahoga: +24,799————————————2. Cuyahoga: +3,961
3. Hamilton: +14,063————————————–3. Hamilton: +2,288
4. Montgomery: +7,418————————————4. Montgomery: +1,131
5. Summit: +7,132——————————————5. Summit: +1,101
6. Butler: +5,226——————————————–6. Butler: +839
7. Lorain: +3,810——————————————–7. Lorain: +641
8. Greene: +3,443——————————————8. Portage: +546
9. Portage: +3,281—————————————–9. Lucas: +539
10. Lucas: +3,247——————————————10. Warren: +499
11. Warren: +3,140—————————————-11. Greene: +473
12. Delaware: +2,178————————————-12. Delaware: +336
13. Athens: +2,081—————————————–13. Athens: +326
14. Mahoning: +1,917————————————-14. Mahoning: +326
15. Lake: +1,740——————————————–15. Lake: +314

Top 15 Counties with the Least International Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Lawrence: -168——————————————1. Lawrence: -19
2. Belmont: -113——————————————–2. Belmont: -18
3. Jefferson: -108——————————————-3. Jefferson: -16
4. Columbiana: -44—————————————–4. Columbiana: -7
5. Williams: -40———————————————-5. Williams: -6
6. Brown: -39————————————————6. Brown: -4
7. Holmes: -16———————————————–7. Holmes: -3
8. Monroe: -5————————————————8. Monroe: -1
9. Vinton: -2————————————————–9. Van Wert: -1
10. Meigs: 0————————————————10. Harrison: 0
11. Trumbull: +2——————————————-11. Ottawa: 0
12. Harrison: +4——————————————-12. Vinton: 0
13. Adams: +7———————————————13. Meigs: +1
14. Van Wert: +10—————————————-14. Noble: +1
15. Noble: +10——————————————–15. Pike: +1
16. Morgan: +10

Top 15 Counties with the Most Net Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Franklin: +59,184—————————————1. Franklin: +12,445
2. Delaware: +17,849————————————–2. Delaware: +2,682
3. Warren: +10,136—————————————-3. Warren: +1,831
4. Fairfield: +5,274—————————————–4. Fairfield: +1,686
5. Licking: +3,928——————————————5. Butler: +1,507
6. Lorain: +3,539——————————————–6. Greene: +1,236
7. Medina: +3,492——————————————-7. Licking: +1,225
8. Wood: +2,720———————————————8. Medina: +1,142
9. Butler: +2,527——————————————–9. Lake: +1,062
10. Union: +2,415—————————————–10. Lorain: +969
11. Greene: +2,038—————————————-11. Union: +952
12. Clermont: +1,975————————————-12. Hamilton: +755
13. Miami: +1,662——————————————-13. Madison: +679
14. Pickaway: +1,556————————————-14. Summit: +649
15. Athens: +1,285——————————————15. Clermont +609

Top 15 Counties with the Least Net Migration Census 2010-July 1, 2017 and July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017

Census 2010-July 1, 2017——————————–July 1, 2016-July 1, 2017
1. Cuyahoga: -40,873————————————1. Cuyahoga: -6,126
2. Lucas: -20,154——————————————2. Lucas: -2,710
3. Hamilton: -11,229————————————–3. Stark: -1,061
4. Montgomery: -9,334———————————–4. Trumbull: -918
5. Trumbull: -6,850—————————————-5. Wayne: -794
6. Allen: -4,504———————————————6. Allen: -596
7. Mahoning: -4,196————————————–7. Richland: -587
8. Richland: -4,087—————————————-8. Columbiana: -535
9. Columbiana: -3,846————————————9. Montgomery: -525
10. Summit: -3,496—————————————-10. Lawrence: -411
11. Stark: -3,408——————————————-11. Marion: -379
12. Ashtabula: -3,327————————————-12. Belmont: -341
13. Scioto: -3,064——————————————13. Ashtabula: -336
14. Clark: -3,032——————————————–14. Tuscarawas: -326
15. Huron: -2,359——————————————-15. Holmes: -319

So there you have it for counties.  Part 2 on Metro and CSAs will be coming soon!




The Origins of the Columbus Metro’s Domestic Migration




Top 30 Largest Net Domestic In-Migration Origins (Ohio Counties and States)

Numbers are based on estimates. Updated 1/24/2018 with 2011-2015 data.

2006-2010————————2009-2013—————————-2011-2015
1. Cuyahoga: 1602———-1. Cuyahoga: 1905————–1. Cuyahoga: 1842
2. Montgomery: 1020——-2. Michigan: 1425—————-2. Michigan: 1239
3. Michigan: 893————-3. Montgomery: 1123————3. Montgomery: 1088
4. Maryland: 745————-4. Summit: 744——————–4. Summit: 764
5. Lorain: 740—————–5. Lorain: 715———————-5. Lucas: 626
6. Virginia: 636—————6. Indiana: 694———————6. New Jersey: 608
7. Mahoning: 603————7. Lucas: 569———————–7. New York: 575
8. Stark: 584——————8. Maryland: 512——————-8. Medina: 572
9. Lucas: 554—————–9. Hamilton: 504——————–9. Stark: 484
10. Summit: 531————-10. Clermont: 466—————–10. Trumbull: 465
11. Highland: 499———–11. Stark: 466———————–11. Maryland: 464
12. New Jersey: 497——-12. Arizona: 463——————–12. Allen: 406
13. Hamilton: 483———–13. Alabama: 431——————-13. Washington (state): 399
14. New York: 419———-14. Trumbull: 401——————-14. Erie: 386
15. Allen: 384—————-15. Mahoning: 387——————15. Indiana: 386
16. Tennessee: 375——–16. Fayette: 354———————16. Massachusetts: 384
17. Logan: 328—————17. Washington (state): 353—–17. Pennsylvania: 371
18. Trumbull: 325————18. Coshocton: 346—————-18. Kentucky: 368
19. Coshocton: 310———19. Medina: 322——————–19. W. Virginia: 339
20. Jefferson: 290———–20. Allen: 302————————20. Lake: 316
21. Scioto: 259—————21. Erie: 290————————-21. Belmont: 314
22. Belmont: 254————22. Highland: 270——————-22. Wayne: 298
23. Huron: 245—————23. Puerto Rico: 265—————23. Fayette: 290
24. Darke: 217—————24. Adams: 260———————24. Mahoning: 289
25. Lake: 212—————-25. Warren: 260———————25. New Hampshire: 288
26. Tuscarawas: 202——-26. Massachusetts: 259———-26. Alaska: 282
27. Iowa: 200—————–27. Wayne: 259———————27. Alabama: 280
28. Shelby: 199————–28. Morgan: 255——————–28. Lorain: 277
29. Medina: 196————-29. Tuscarawas: 253————–29. Tuscarawas: 277
30. Massachusetts: 192—30. Ashtabula: 244—————–30. Geauga: 261

Top 30 Largest Net Domestic Out-Migration Destinations (Ohio counties and States)

2006-2010——————————-2009-2013—————————-2011-2015
1. Texas: -1371———————-1. Georgia: -1024—————-1. Florida: -1333
2. Knox: -942————————-2. Florida: -1013——————2. Missouri: -703
3. North Carolina: -782————3. Greene: -524——————-3. Georgia: -680
4. Georgia: -718———————4. Missouri: -516——————4. Athens: -607
5. Athens: -679———————-5. Colorado: -448—————–5. Knox: -506
6. Kentucky: -516——————-6. California: -436—————–6. Tennessee: -442
7. South Carolina: -499———–7. South Carolina: -431———-7. Colorado: -435
8. California: -364——————-8. Knox: -418———————-8. California: -391
9. Florida: -360———————-9. North Carolina: -417———-9. Greene: -388
10. Wood: -351———————10. Wisconsin: -395————–10. South Carolina: -362
11. Richland: -344——————11. Athens: -336——————11. Marion: -329
12. Greene: -239——————–12. Minnesota: -308————-12. Hamilton: -312
13. West Virginia: -236————13. Utah: -290———————13. Logan: -306
14. Missouri: -219——————-14. Richland: -266—————14. Utah: -300
15. Crawford: -209——————15. Portage: -265—————–15. Wood: -282
16. Hardin: -179———————16. Kentucky: -257—————16. Scioto: -249
17. Noble: -177———————-17. Logan: -242——————-17. Seneca: -183
18. Muskingum: -175—————18. Pennsylvania: -242———18. Champaign: -174
19. Butler: -173———————-19. Tennessee: -200————19. Oregon: -158
20. Holmes: -163——————–20. Oregon: -187—————-20. New Mexico: -157
21. Marion: -138———————21. Wood: -166——————21. Meigs: -150
22. Portage: -134——————-22. Sandusky: -157————–22. Mississippi: -146
23. Ottawa: -131——————–23. Mississippi: -151————-23. Portage: -142
24. Sandusky: -124—————-24. Jefferson: -127—————24. Idaho: -137
25. Oregon: -120——————-25. Kansas: -98——————-25. Minnesota: -125
26. Indiana: -116——————-26. Delaware (state): -88——-26. North Dakota: -112
27. Idaho: -115———————27. Idaho: -74———————-27. Wisconsin: -111
28. Utah: -103———————- 28. Crawford: -73—————–28. Darke: -103
29. Fayette: -93———————29. Hardin: -68——————–29. Texas: -95
30. Kansas: -90———————30. Seneca: -66——————-30. Hardin: -87

Top 25 Largest Positive Swings Between 2006-2010 and 2011-2015
1. Texas: +1276
2. North Carolina: +982
3. Kentucky: +884
4. West Virginia: +575
5. Indiana: +502
6. Washington (state): +466
7. Knox: +436
8. Richland: +406
9. Butler: +395
10. Fayette: +383
11. Medina: +376
12. Alaska: +364
13. Michigan: +346
14. Alabama: +298
15. Clinton: +282
16. Erie: +263
17. New Hampshire: +261
18. Lawrence: +241
19. Cuyahoga: +240
20. Summit: +233
21. Wayne: +226
22. Crawford: +221
23. Muskingum: +211
24. Clermont: +198
25. Nevada: +197

Top 25 Largest Negative Swings Between 2006-2010 and 2011-2015
1. Florida: -973
2. Tennessee: -817
3. Hamilton: -795
4. Logan: -634
5. Colorado: -598
6. Scioto: -508
7. Highland: -491
8. Missouri: -484
9. Lorain: -463
10. Virginia: -437
11. Darke: -320
12. Mahoning: -314
13. Champaign: -310
14. Jefferson: -301
15. Maryland: -281
16. New Mexico: -261
17. Minnesota: -249
19. Coshocton: -233
20. Washington (county): -208
21. Ashland: -202
22. Utah: -197
23. Marion: -191
24. Seneca: -181
25. Iowa: -158

Total Counts By Period
Positive Ohio Counties
2006-2010: 53
2009-2013: 57
2011-2015: 50

Positive States, including DC and Puerto Rico
2006-2010: 21
2009-2013: 24
2011-2015: 28

Total Net In-Migration
Ohio
2006-2010: +8,008
2009-2013: +11,366
2011-2015: +7,895

Outside Ohio
2006-2010: -1,158
2009-2013: -466
2011-2015: +1,598

Ohio and Outside Ohio
2006-2010: +6,850
2009-2013: +10,900
2011-2015: +9,493

All these figures show that the Columbus metro has net positive domestic migration. While the majority of that comes from within the state, Columbus’ previously negative net total from outside the state has more recently become positive as well. For a long time, Columbus’ relative success was not well-known outside of the state, but perhaps word is finally getting out.

For a lot more Columbus demographic information, check out: Columbus Demographics




Failed Project #4: The Big Darby Creek Reservoirs




The Big Darby Creek watershed is one of the best natural areas of Franklin County. Designated a national and state scenic river, Big Darby Creek is one of Ohio’s most pristine waterways, and is home to several endangered species. Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park has grown to become the crown jewel of the Metro Parks system, encompassing more than 7,000 acres of forests, waterways and prairie.

The river’s history, however, has not always been so tranquil.

All the way back in 1943, Ohio State University zoologist Milton Trautman discovered a tiny catfish in Big Darby, the Scioto Madtom. The fish only exists in the Big Darby, and was an early clue as to the biological diversity that can be found there, now known to be home to more than 100 species of fish and more than 40 species of mussels.

By 1950, a small park of 34 acres had formed, the beginning of what would become the Battelle Darby. Development pressures, however, were already threatening the system. I-70 cut through the middle of the system in the early 1960s, and the construction of I-270 allowed for the suburban explosion. Without significant intervention, the watershed would’ve been inevitably developed. Ironically, a plan to largely destroy the Big Darby ultimately helped saved it.

While most major rivers and streams in the state had been dammed or altered for flood control by the 1960s, Big Darby remained free-flowing. Two separate proposed projects would’ve changed that irrevocably. The first was a proposal by the Army Corps of Engineers to build what would’ve been called the Lower Darby Dam, in west-central Franklin County, near the heart of the current Battelle Darby park. The high dam proposal would’ve flooded at least 3,000 acres of land, and the Corps began to buy the land in preparation for the project. This was in the late 1960s, coinciding with the beginning of the development boom in western suburbs like Hilliard. Instead of prime real estate along the river being developed with single-family housing and strip malls, the dam plan had the opposite effect by making the land essentially unmarketable and off limits to developers. A coinciding proposal by the City of Columbus to build another dam, the Upper Darby Dam, had the same effect on areas at that proposed site in Brown Township further to the north. The 2-dam proposal had effectively removed the majority of Franklin County’s Big Darby Creek off the market.

As development pressure was removed, environmental groups rose up to stop the Lower Darby Dam project itself. This fight was waged until 1973, when the plan was finally abandoned by the Army Corps of Engineers. They still owned the land, however, and with uncertainty of the dam project resurfacing someday, development interests continued to stay away. Three years later, in 1976, Columbus Metro Parks received a $1 million grant from the Battelle Memorial Foundation, which was then matched with an additional $1 million grant from the U.S. Department of the Interior Land and Water Conservation Fund. Suddenly flush with cash, Metro Parks began a land-buying spree along the Big Darby, particularly targeting the land that the Corps had set aside for the reservoir, pushing the size of the park from roughly 400 acres in 1976 to about 3,000 acres by 1984.

That year, on June 22, 1984, 82 miles of the Big and Little Darby creeks were designated as state scenic rivers. The designation more or less ended any remaining plans for the Upper Darby Dam. It had been shelved since 1979 when the Department of Natural Resources and environmental groups managed to stop that dam project as well. Just 4 years after the scenic river designation, during the extremely dry, hot summer of 1988, the idea of the dam was revived. Former Columbus Service Director Walter “Hap” Cremean, whose name today is on some city facilities, considered the Big Darby key to Columbus’ future water needs. The city was searching for a source of water that could provide the city with an additional 30 million gallons of water a day by 2000, not a small task. Cremean himself had been the city’s service director at the time that Columbus was pushing for the dam project in the 1960s.
On July 12, 1988, Cremean was quoted saying, “In 1968, we instituted the acquisition of property along Big Darby. We were spending $1 million a year for what we considered the next major reservoir site for Franklin County,” Cremean said. “In my opinion, it is impossible to talk about full development of the West Side without (Big Darby).”

The search for new sources of water for Columbus continued into the early 1990s, but by 1990, the Big Darby reservoir option was losing favor due to its long history of opposition. The city had drafted a study called Water Beyond 2000, which was finished on September 26, 1991. At least 20 options for expanding water sources had been on the table, including the Big Darby reservoir, but the study had narrowed down the choices to just 7. Among the choices eliminated from consideration was the Big Darby plan, an option that the study concluded was going to be one of the most expensive, at $280 million. For all intents and purposes, the idea of a Big Darby reservoir was finally dead… or sort of. While a reservoir directly on the Darby was off the table, a reservoir in the watershed using the Darby’s water was still very much on.

Through the rest of 1991 and into the first half of 1992, residents waited for the list of 7 options to be narrowed down further. On July 6, 1992, that final list came out. The Big Darby option was eliminated completely. No reservoir would be built anywhere near it. In the end, the Columbus Upground Reservoir was built just to the southeast of Richwood, along with new wells drilled along the Pickaway-Franklin County line. Combined, they provided more than enough water to serve the city long into the future.

Columbus Upground Reservoir

The following year, in 1993, the Big and Little Darby were given National Scenic River status, the highest designation a US river can receive. Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park has continued to expand beyond 7,000 acres and will continue to grow even larger in the future, with the ultimate goal of having the entire 75 miles of Big Darby as part of a continuous park. Development pressures remain in the area, and in recent years, there have been the occasional fish and mussel die-offs, suggesting that the Big Darby is still under threat. What we do with this beautiful natural resource is up to us. Though dams are no longer in the picture, other dangers lurk.
In the early 1990s during the height of the water search, the Big Darby was not the only waterway under threat. A similar dam project was under proposal for the Scioto River in Delaware County. My family was moving at the time and we looked at a house near the small town of Prospect, not far from where the proposed dam would’ve gone. On the trip there, a series of roadside signs caught our attention, and I still remember the rhyme:
A flooded valley,
We don’t deserve,
Because Columbus,
Can’t conserve.
The rhyme was referring strictly to water conservation, but it seems to me that saving water- and indeed all natural resources- does not just mean using less. The Big Darby, along with all our waterways and natural areas, deserve our lasting protection. Had better heads not prevailed, Battelle Darby would’ve been under 50 feet of water today, and Columbus- and Ohio- would be without one of its best natural areas.

Check out other Columbus-area failed projects here:
Ohio’s Atom Collider
Gay/Front Office Tower
1984-1985 High Street Road Diet




Young Professionals: A Comparison

**Updated 11/22/2017.

Millennials and Young Professionals are big news these days. Millennials are the largest generation ever in terms of total numbers (exceeding 76 million), and their choices are already having big impacts on everything from housing to the economy, and Young Professionals have long been an important urban demographic. I wanted to look at Columbus and its peers to see where it ranks in terms of attracting the 25-34 age group that include these demographics.

For the comparison, I looked at metro areas of 1.5-2.5 million as well as major Midwest metros and then used their core cities to get the numbers.

Rank of Total Population Aged 25-34

2005_______________________2010___________________2016

1. Chicago: 463,236_______1. Chicago: 510,042________1. Chicago: 532,349
2. San Antonio: 180,981_____2. San Antonio: 200,645____2. San Antonio: 241,783
3. Austin: 137,523_________3. Austin: 162,247_________3. Austin: 214,687
4. San Jose, CA: 133,144___4. Columbus: 147,584______4. Columbus: 180,685
5. Columbus: 131,641______5. San Jose, CA: 142,551___5. San Jose, CA: 165,408
6. Indianapolis: 114,532_____6. Indianapolis: 133,088____6. Charlotte, NC: 149,024
7. Detroit: 110,759_________7. Charlotte, NC: 127,539___7. Indianapolis: 143,328
8. Charlotte, NC: 100,025____8. Portland, OR: 113,210___8. Nashville: 130,593
9. Portland, OR: 90,023_____9. Nashville: 110,882______9. Portland: 127,557
10. Las Vegas: 84,418______10. Milwaukee: 97,359____10. Milwaukee: 101,449
11. Milwaukee: 82,060______11. Detroit: 85,023_______11. Detroit: 101,246
12. Sacramento, CA: 75,497___12. Minneapolis: 81,532__12. Sacramento: 92,883
13. Minneapolis: 74,208___13. Las Vegas: 81,212______13. Minneapolis: 90,022
14. Kansas City, MO: 68,060__14. Sacramento: 78,527__14. Las Vegas: 84,756
15. Virginia Beach: 60,749__15. Kansas City: 73,872____15. Kansas City: 81,532
16. Omaha, NE: 56,248____16. Virginia Beach: 67,614__16. Virginia Beach: 75,365
17. Wichita, KS: 52,426____17. Omaha: 62,396________17. Omaha: 72,055
18. Cleveland: 50,558_____18. St. Louis: 57,627_______18. Orlando: 63,947
19. St. Louis: 48,137______19. Wichita: 56,737________19. Pittsburgh: 62,515
20. Cincinnati: 44,945_____20. Cleveland: 54,428______20. St. Louis: 61,777
21. Toledo: 43,134_______21. Pittsburgh: 51,109______21. Cleveland: 58,773
22. Orlando: 40,846______22. St. Paul: 50,107________22. Wichita: 57,869
23. St. Paul, MN: 39,676__23. Cincinnati: 49,067_______23. St. Paul: 55,306
24. Lincoln, NE: 38,893___24. Orlando: 48,102________24. Cincinnati: 54,754
25. Madison, WI: 38,826___25. Madison: 44,662_______25. Madison: 48,759
26. Pittsburgh: 38,744____26. Lincoln: 42,034_________26. Lincoln: 43,882
27. Grand Rapids: 35,287__27. Toledo: 41,580________27: Toledo: 42,888
28. Des Moines: 32,640__28. Fort Wayne: 35,193______28. Grand Rapids: 39,829
29. Fort Wayne, IN: 31,738__29. Providence: 31,044____29. Fort Wayne: 37,372
30. Akron: 30,436_______30. Grand Rapids: 30,963____30. Des Moines: 34,961
31. Providence, RI: 29,307__31. Des Moines: 30,376____31. Providence: 30,630
32. Dayton: 18,591_______32. Akron: 27,446_________32. Akron: 29,786
33. Youngstown: 8,505____33. Dayton: 20,278________33. Dayton: 22,930
34. Nashville, TN: N/A___34. Youngtown: 8,484_______34. Youngstown: 7,621

So Columbus ranks highly among total population in the 25-34 age group. But what about growth?

Total Growth Rank in 25-34 Population 2005-2016

1. Austin, TX: 77,164
2. Chicago: 69,113
3. San Antonio, TX: 60,802
4. Columbus: 49,044
5. Charlotte, NC: 48,999
6. Portland, OR: 37,534
7. San Jose, CA: 32,264
8. Indianapolis, IN: 28,796
9. Pittsburgh, PA: 23,771
10. Orlando, FL: 23,101
11. Milwaukee, WI: 19,389
12. Sacramento, CA: 17,386
13. Minneapolis, MN: 15,814
14. Omaha, NE: 15,807
15. St. Paul, MN: 15,630
16. Virginia Beach, VA: 14,616
17. St. Louis, MO: 13,642
18. Kansas City, MO: 13,472
19. Madison, WI: 9,933
20. Cincinnati: 9,809
21. Cleveland: 8,215
22. Fort Wayne, IN: 5,634
23. Wichita, KS: 5,443
24. Lincoln, NE: 4,989
25. Grand Rapids, MI: 4,542
26. Dayton: 4,339
27. Des Moines, IA: 2,321
28. Providence, RI: 1,323
29. Las Vegas, NV: 338
30. Toledo: -246
31. Akron: -650
32. Youngstown: -884
33. Detroit, MI: -9,513
34. Nashville: N/A

Again, Columbus ranks near the top during this period. What about more recently, since 2010?

Total Growth Rank of 25-34 Population 2010-2016

1. Austin: 52,440
2. San Antonio: 41,138
3. Columbus: 33,101
4. San Jose: 22,857
5. Chicago: 22,307
6. Charlotte: 21,485
7. Nashville: 19,711
8. Detroit: 16,223
9. Orlando: 15,845
10. Sacramento: 14,356
11. Portland: 14,347
12. Pittsburgh: 11,406
13. Indianapolis: 10,240
14. Omaha: 9,659
15. Grand Rapids: 8,866
16. Minneapolis: 8,490
17. Virginia Beach: 7,751
18. Kansas City: 7,660
19. Cincinnati: 5,687
20. St. Paul: 5,199
21. Des Moines: 4,585
22. Cleveland: 4,345
23. St. Louis: 4,152
24. Madison: 4,097
25. Milwaukee: 4,090
26. Las Vegas: 3,544
27. Dayton: 2,652
28. Akron: 2,340
29. Fort Wayne: 2,179
30. Lincoln: 1,848
31. Toledo: 1,308
32. Wichita: 1,132
33. Providence: -414
34. Youngstown: -863

So Columbus is also doing well since 2010 and attracts significantly more people in the 25-34 age group than cities often cited for this very metric.

Finally, now that we know the totals and the growth, what is the % of total city population that the 25-34 age group makes up?

25-34 % of Total City Population 2016

1. Orlando: 23.1%
2. Austin: 22.6%
3. Minneapolis: 21.8%
4. Columbus: 20.9%
5. Pittsburgh: 20.6%
6. Grand Rapids: 20.3%
7. Portland: 19.9%
8. Nashville: 19.8%
9. St. Louis: 19.8%
10. Chicago: 19.7%
11. Madison: 19.3%
12. Sacramento: 18.8%
13. Cincinnati: 18.3%
14. St. Paul: 18.3%
15. Charlotte: 17.7%
16. Providence: 17.1%
17. Milwaukee: 17.0%
18. Kansas City: 16.9%
19. Indianapolis: 16.8%
20. Virginia Beach: 16.7%
21. Des Moines: 16.2%
22. San Antonio: 16.2%
23. Omaha: 16.1%
24. San Jose: 16.1%
25. Lincoln: 15.7%
26. Toledo: 15.4%
27. Cleveland: 15.2%
28. Akron: 15.1%
29. Detroit: 15.0%
30. Wichita: 14.8%
31. Fort Wayne: 14.3%
32. Las Vegas: 13.4%
33. Youngstown: 11.9%
34. Dayton: 8.2%

Columbus has an existing large population of the 25-34 age demographic, and looks to be one of the strongest performers into the near future.
Some would ask why that would be considering that Columbus transit is woefully lacking and has a reputation (very undeservedly, in my opinion) of being suburban- characteristics that Millennials/YPers supposedly almost universally reject. Perhaps the bottom line is that economics trump all other desires. Cost of living and employment tend to be higher up the list than rail lines, and Columbus has both a strong economy and relatively low COL. Whatever the case may be, Columbus seems to be doing something right.

For more information on demographics, go to: Columbus Demographics
And for Franklin County racial and economic maps, go to: Census Tract and Zip Code Maps