2016 City Population Estimates



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The Census released its annual estimates for cities yesterday, so here’s a look at the new numbers.

Top 25 Ohio Cities on July 1, 2016 and Total Change Since July 1, 2015

1. Columbus: 860,090 +10,046
2. Cleveland: 385,809 -2,003
3. Cincinnati: 298,800 +146
4. Toledo: 278,508 -1,168
5. Akron: 197,633 -611
6. Dayton: 140,489 -86
7. Parma: 79,425 -457
8. Canton: 71,323 -542
9. Youngstown: 64,312 -401
10. Lorain: 63,730 +62
11. Hamilton: 62,127 -135
12. Springfield: 59,087 -531
13. Kettering: 55,306 -153
14. Elyria: 53,715 -81
15. Lakewood: 50,279 -342
16. Cuyahoga Falls: 49,206 -134
17. Newark: 49,134 +392
18. Middletown: 48,813 +131
19. Euclid: 47,360 -283
20. Mentor: 46,732 -162
21. Mansfield: 46,678 -187
22. Beavercreek: 46,376 +204
23. Dublin: 45,568 +473
24. Cleveland Heights: 44,633 -298
25. Strongsville: 44,631 -1

The only change in the top 25 was that Newark moved up one spot to #17, knocking down Middletown. Columbus continues to add more people than all the other 24 combined.

Now all cities and places with the Columbus Metro Area.
Total Population on July 1, 2016
1. Columbus: 860,090
2. Newark: 49,134
3. Dublin: 45,568
4. Lancaster: 39,848
5. Grove City: 39,721
6. Westerville: 38,985
7. Delaware: 38,643
8. Reynoldsburg: 37,449
9. Upper Arlington: 34,997
10. Gahanna: 34,956
11. Hilliard: 34,905
12. Marysville: 23,406
13. Pickerington: 20,069
14. Whitehall: 18,736
15. Pataskala: 15,458
16. Worthington: 14,528
17. Circleville: 13,902
18. Bexley: 13,669
19. Powell: 12,810
20. Heath: 10,625
21. New Albany: 10,360
22. London: 10,158
23. Canal Winchester: 7,905
24. Grandview Heights: 7,628
25. Logan: 7,085
26. Granville: 5,771
27. Groveport: 5,552
28. Sunbury: 5,216
29. Johnstown: 4,970
30. Obetz: 4,811
31. New Lexington: 4,722
32. Plain City: 4,357
33. West Jefferson: 4,329
34. Ashville: 4,194
35. Mount Gilead: 3,671
36. Baltimore: 2,973
37. Buckeye Lake: 2,766
38. Crooksville: 2,497
39. Hebron: 2,402
40. Richwood: 2,316
41. Utica: 2,191
42. Cardington: 2,062
43. South Bloomfield: 1,864
44. Roseville: 1,848
45. Mount Sterling: 1,760
46. Commercial Point: 1,611
47. Ashley: 1,500
48. Somerset: 1,463
49. Bremen: 1,434
50. Lithopolis: 1,429
51. Minerva Park: 1,312
52. Hanover: 1,162
53. Williamsport: 1,061
54. Millersport: 1,049
55. Thornville: 997
56. Urbancrest: 984
57. Pleasantville: 958
58. Milford Center: 840
59. New Holland: 836
60. Junction City: 805
61. Shawnee Hills: 769
62. Amanda: 740
63. New Straitsville: 711
64. Ostrander: 695
65. Marble Cliff: 671
66. Galena: 665
67. Shawnee: 643
68. Valleyview: 628
69. Thurston: 597
70. Corning: 571
71. Riverlea: 565
72. Stoutsville: 558
73. Buchtel: 553
74. Kirkersville: 535
75. Alexandria: 530
76. Carroll: 521
77. Laurelville: 510
78. Edison: 446
79. Murray City: 438
80. Sugar Grove: 432
81. Hartford: 405
82. St. Louisville: 379
83. South Solon: 361
84. Marengo: 346
85. Harrisburg: 335
86. Midway: 328
87. Rushville: 311
88. Tarlton: 287
89. Magnetic Springs: 281
90. Orient: 277
91. Fulton: 261
92. Lockbourne: 248
93. Darbyville: 238
94. Unionville Center: 237
95. Chesterville: 230
96. Gratiot: 223
97. Glenford: 176
98. Sparta: 163
99. Hemlock: 156
100. West Rushville: 137
101. Brice: 121
102. Rendville: 36

Several large suburbs are on the cusp of the 40,000 population mark, and Newark is poised to be the first to exceed 50,000.

Total Population Change July 1, 2015-July 1, 2016
1. Columbus: +10,046
2. Hilliard: +1,255
3. Delaware: +615
4. Marysville: +575
5. Grove City: +509
6. Dublin: +473
7. New Albany: +459
8. Westerville: +450
9. Newark: +392
10. Gahanna: +372
11. Grandview Heights: +361
12. Pickerington: +337
13. Reynoldsburg: +258
14. Powell: +174
15. Pataskala: +134
16. Lancaster: +123
17. Sunbury: +114
18. Upper Arlington: +100
19. Heath: +89
20. Lithopolis: +82
21. Canal Winchester: +79
22. Granville: +62
23. Circleville: +56
24. Obetz: +46
25. Whitehall: +46
26. Richwood: +44
27. Johnstown: +39
28. Worthington: +39
29. Marble Cliff: +32
30. Ashley: +28
31. Hebron: +18
32. London: +17
33. West Jefferson: +17
34. Bexley: +16
35. Milford Center: +16
36. Shawnee Hills: +16
37. Hanover: +15
38. Ostrander: +15
39. Utica: +15
40. Ashville: +13
41. Buckeye Lake: +13
42. Groveport: +13
43. South Bloomfield: +12
44. Commercial Point: +8
45. Williamsport: +5
46. Magnetic Springs: +4
47. Alexandria: +3
48. Baltimore: +3
49. Bremen: +3
50. Kirkersville: +3
51. Minerva Park: +3
52. New Holland: +3
53. St. Louisville: +3
54. Carroll: +2
55. Harrisburg: +2
56. Hartford: +2
57. Plain City: +2
58. Riverlea: +2
59. Sugar Grove: +2
60. Tarlton: +2
61. Brice: +1
62. Darbyville: +1
63. Galena: +1
64. Gratiot: +1
65. Lockbourne: +1
66. Midway: +1
67. Millersport: +1
68. Mount Sterling: +1
69. Orient: +1
70. Rushville: +1
71. Urbancrest: +1
72. West Rushville: +1
73. Amanda: 0
74. Fulton: 0
75. Glenford: 0
76. Hemlock: 0
77. Marengo: 0
78. Pleasantville: 0
79. Rendville: 0
80. South Solon: 0
81. Sparta: 0
82. Thurston: 0
83. Unionville Center: 0
84. Valleyview: 0
85. Chesterville: -1
86. Edison: -1
87. Stoutsville: -1
88. Thornville: -1
89. Buchtel: -2
90. Murray City: -2
91. Somerset: -2
92. Corning: -3
93. Junction City: -3
94. Laurelville: -3
95. New Straitsville: -3
96. Shawnee: -3
97. Cardington: -4
98. Crooksville: -8
99. Mount Gilead: -8
100. Roseville: -8
101. New Lexington: -13
102. Logan: -19

Overall, the vast majority of places in the Columbus metro continue to add people.



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Election 2016

I’m not going to get into any debate on the candidates themselves or what I personally thought/think of them. That’s not the point of this post, and frankly, there’s already plenty of opinions all over the internet on this.

First, here is a map of total Democratic votes within Ohio’s counties.

As is typical, Democratic votes were most concentrated in counties with large cities.

Here are the metro areas that provided the most Democratic votes.

1. Cleveland: 561,368
2. Columbus: 450,146
3. Cincinnati: 339,159
4. Akron: 166,653
5. Dayton: 164,079
6. Toledo: 152,505
7. Youngstown: 100,395

And the top 10 counties with the most Democratic votes.
1. Cuyahoga: 398,271
2. Franklin: 351,198
3. Hamilton: 215,719
4. Summit: 134,256
5. Montgomery: 122,016
6. Lucas: 110,833
7. Stark: 68,146
8. Lorain: 66,949
9. Butler: 58,642
10. Mahoning: 57,381

Here is how Democratic votes changed by county between 2012 and 2016.

As you can see, only a handful of counties saw Democratic votes increase in 2016 over 2012, Franklin County being one of them. Some of the biggest losses were in traditionally blue areas like Northeast Ohio.

And the map for total Republican votes.

Republican votes by metro area.
1. Cincinnati: 440,375
2. Columbus: 429,930
3. Cleveland: 400,321
4. Dayton: 210,807
5. Akron: 151,997
6. Toledo: 134,558
7. Youngstown: 102,640

Top 10 counties for Republican votes.
1. Franklin: 199,331
2. Cuyahoga: 184,211
3. Hamilton: 173,665
4. Montgomery: 123,909
5. Summit: 112,026
6. Butler: 106,976
7. Stark: 98,388
8. Warren: 77,643
9. Lucas: 75,698
10. Clermont: 67,518

And here is the change of Republican votes in 2016 vs. 2012.

Most of Ohio’s counties saw increased Republican turnout, though again, Franklin County bucked the trend and actually saw declines.

Finally, a map of the net % change for each county and whether it trended more Republican or more Democratic vs. the net of the 2012 election.

Almost all counties saw a net decrease of Democratic votes/increase in Republican votes. Only 3 counties of 88- Franklin, Delaware and Hamilton- trended more Democratic in 2016 over 2012. All the other 85 trended Republican.

Loss of Data

Because of a huge mistake by my hosting company, my site was both down all day yesterday and I have come to see that I have lost tons of data and posts since mid-October, including my economic segregation piece that I put weeks of time and research into. To call it frustrating is the understatement of the year. I will attempt to remake some of this stuff, but unfortunately I have not saved all of my work. Lesson learned, and perhaps it is time to look for a new host.

Random Columbus Photos #3

Photo Date: November 1, 1914
Location: 136 E. Broad Street

The photo shows the ongoing excavation of the Columbus Athletic Club. It was conceived a few years prior as a social club in 1912 by a group of wealthy Columbus businessmen. The organization was originally housed in the Atlas Building at Gay and High, but wanted their own building. Construction began in early 1914 and the 6-story building was dedicated in 1915. The 100-year-old institution, now on the National Register of Historic Places, looks pretty much the same as it did when it was first built, and it remains a private club to this day. Over the years, the club has had many prominent members, including politicians and even a president, Warren G. Harding.

Columbus’ Changing Transit Scene

There’s been some discussion over the last few years about how driving habits are changing nationally. I’ve seen at least a few reports suggesting that overall driving is actually on the decline and has been for some time. This even while the population of the US continues to rise. A new report has come out detailing the changing habits of cities. Here is how Columbus and other Ohio cities fared.

Percent Change in Per-Capita Vehicle Miles Traveled from 2006-2011
Columbus: -5.7%
Dayton: -0.2%
Akron: +1.2%
Cleveland: +5.1%
Youngstown: +5.4%
Cincinnati: N/A
Toledo: N/A

Columbus saw the largest drop in vehicle miles traveled, indicating that people there are driving less. Northeast Ohio all saw increases, which goes against the national trend. Toledo and Cincinnati did not have comparable numbers.

Percent Change in Per-Capita Passenger Miles Traveled on Mass Transit 2005-2010
Columbus: +1.6%
Dayton: -0.6%
Akron: -2.8%
Youngstown: -8.3%
Toledo: -28.8%
Cleveland: -34.2%
Cincinnati: -34.8%

Columbus was the only city to see an increase in its mass transit miles. Cleveland, Cincinnati saw drops of more than 1/3rd.


Change in the Proportion of Workers who Commuted by Car, 2000-2011

Dayton: -1.5%
Columbus: -1.2%
Toledo: -1.0%
Youngstown: -1.0%
Akron: -0.8%
Cleveland: -0.4%
Cincinnati: -0.2%

All 7 saw declines.

Change in the Proportion of Workers who Biked to Work, 2000-2011
Columbus: +0.3%
Akron: +0.1%
Cleveland: +0.1%
Dayton: +0.1%
Toledo: +0.1%
Cincinnati: +0%
Youngstown: +0%

Columbus saw the largest increase of all 7, although the actual changes are all small. No city measured in the US saw a change of more than +1.7%. The majority of cities were less than 0.3%.

Change in the Proportion of Workers Who Worked From Home, 2000-2011
Columbus: +1.4%
Cincinnati: +0.9%
Dayton: +0.8%
Cleveland: +0.6%
Toledo: +0.6%
Youngstown: +0.6%
Akron: +0.5%

Columbus again leads, though all cities saw increases.

Total Per-Capita Vehicle Miles Traveled in 2006
Cleveland: 8,285
Youngstown: 8,806
Akron: 9,379
Columbus: 9,956
Dayton: 10,084
Cincinnati: N/A
Toledo: N/A

Total Per-Capita Vehicle Miles Traveled in 2011
Cleveland: 8,705
Youngstown: 9,284
Columbus: 9,385
Akron: 9,490
Dayton: 10,068
Cincinnati: N/A
Toledo: N/A

Total Per-Capita Mass-Transit Miles Traveled in 2005
Cleveland: 172.0
Cincinnati: 110.0
Dayton: 64.7
Columbus: 52.6
Toledo: 51.6
Akron: 42.9
Youngstown: 17.3

Total Per-Capita Mass-Transit Miles Traveled in 2010
Cleveland: 113.0
Cincinnati: 71.8
Dayton: 64.1
Columbus: 53.4
Akron: 41.7
Toledo: 36.7
Youngstown: 15.9

% of Workers who Traveled by Car, 2011
Cleveland: 89.2%
Columbus: 89.8%
Cincinnati: 90.6%
Dayton: 91.4%
Akron: 92.5%
Toledo: 93.1%
Youngstown: 94.4%

National Rank (of 100 cities) in the % Change for those who Biked to Work, 2000-2011
Columbus: 15th
Dayton: 37th
Cleveland: 38th
Akron: 39th
Toledo: 49th
Cincinnati: 74th
Youngstown: 81st


% Change of Households with No Vehicle, 2006-2011

Akron: +2.2%
Dayton: +1.0%
Cleveland: +0.9%
Columbus: +0.9%
Cincinnati: -0.3%
Toledo: -0.4%
Youngstown: N/A

% Change of Households with 2+ Vehicles, 2006-2011
Toledo: -4.2%
Akron: -3.6%
Dayton: -2.8%
Cleveland: -2.6%
Columbus: -1.4%
Cincinnati: -1.1%
Youngstown: N/A

So what does all this data tell us? Well, for the most part, all Ohio cities are seeing car use decline in some way or another. Columbus performs strongly in car use declines and increases in at-home workers and increases in bike commuting. Mass-transit was where it performed the weakest, where it’s middle of the pack. Yet even there, it saw increases in its use.

Full study link: http://uspirg.org/sites/pirg/files/reports/US_Transp_trans_scrn.pdf